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Current Courses

composite view of the H-Wing in spring/summer, fall, and winter

Our course listings are always being updated to reflect the most accurate descriptions. Please email the course instructor if you have any questions!

Click HERE for our 2022 Fall Course Offerings and HERE for Winter 2022. You can also jump to our yearlong D-level courses for 2022-23.

Explore our different course requirements and discover specific routes through each program by clicking on the Programs & Courses menu. For specific advice regarding course selection and program requirements, please contact our Undergraduate Coordinator: eng-ugc.utsc@utoronto.ca

 

☀️ SUMMER 2022 COURSES ☀️

 

ENGA01H3 What is Literature ☀️ 

Instructor:  Andrew Dubois

This course introduces the fundamentals of studying English at the university level, and builds the skills needed to successfully navigate English degree programs as well as a liberal arts education more broadly. Students will learn how to read texts closely and think critically; they will practice presenting their ideas in a clear, supported way; they will be exposed to a variety of texts in different forms and genres; and they will gain a working familiarity with in-discipline terminology and methodologies. Moreover, the course is an opportunity to explore the power exercised by literature on all levels of society, from the individual and personal to the political and global.

ENGA01H3 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA02H3 Critical Writing About Literature ☀️

Instructors: Maria Assif and Niyosha Keyzad

Intensive training in critical writing atbout literature. Students learn essay-writing skills (explication; organization and argumentation; research techniques; bibliographies and MLA-style citation) necessary for the study of English at the university level through group workshops, multiple short papers, and a major research-based paper. This is not a grammar course; students are expected to enter with solid English literacy skills.

ENGA02H3 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGB12H3 Life Writing ☀️

Instructor: Sarah King

Life-writing, whether formal biography, chatty memoir, postmodern biotext, or published personal journal, is popular with writers and readers alike. This course introduces students to life-writing as a literary genre and explores major issues such as life-writing and fiction, life-writing and history, the contract between writer and reader, and gender and life-writing.

 

ENGB34 The Short Story ☀️

Instructor: Neal Dolan

An introduction to the short story as a literary form. This course examines the origins and recent development of the short story, its special appeal for writers and readers, and the particular effects it is able to produce.

ENGB60H3 Creative Writing: Poetry I ☀️

Instructor: Ryan Fitzpatrick

A focused introduction to the writing of poetry. This course will enable students to explore the writing of poetry through reading, discussion, and workshop sessions.

 

ENGB61H3 Creative Writing: Fiction I ☀️

Instructor: Christine Ottoni

A focused introduction to the writing of fiction. This course will enable students to explore the writing of short fiction through reading, discussion, and workshop sessions.

 

ENGB70H3 How to Read a Film ☀️

Instructor: Émilie Jacob

The central question this course seeks to answer is “how do we read films?” We will start with learning about formal elements such as mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, sound, and narrative. From there, we will explore how films are shaped by their form, genre, director, context, and style. As one of the most significant mediums, cinema plays a critical role in shaping our culture. This course will equip you with the necessary tools for reading and analyzing films, inviting you to ask bigger questions about the cinematic form, media culture, and storytelling. This course will prepare you for future and more advanced courses in film and media studies.

ENGB70 is required for our Literature and Film Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGC10H3 Studies in Shakespeare ☀️

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

An in-depth study of selected plays from Shakespeare's dramatic corpus combined with an introduction to the critical debates within Shakespeare studies. Students will gain a richer understanding of Shakespeare's texts and their critical reception.

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC50H3 Studies in Contemporary American Fiction ☀️

Instructor: Daniel Direkoglu

Developments in American fiction from the end of the 1950's to the present: the period that produced James Baldwin, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, John Updike, Norman Mailer, Ann Beatty, Raymond Carver, Don DeLillo, Toni Morrison, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Leslie Marmon Silko, among others.

 

ENGD07H3 Studies in Postmodern Poetry ☀️

Instructor: Andrew Dubois

The study of a poet or poets writing in English after 1950. Topics may include the use and abuse of tradition, the art and politics of form, the transformations of an oeuvre, and the relationship of poetry to the individual person and to the culture at large.

 

ENGD89H3 Topics in the Victorian Period ☀️

Instructor: Thomas Laughlin

Topics vary from year to year and might include Victorian children's literature; city and country in Victorian literature; science and nature in Victorian writing; aestheticism and decadence; or steampunk.

Pre-1900 course

 
 
 

 

FALL 2022 COURSES


Click for...

A-Level Courses

B-Level Courses

C-Level Courses

D-Level Courses


FALL 2022 A-LEVEL COURSES

A-level courses are meant to offer a wide-ranging introduction to the fundamentals of studying English. They are good starting places because they are intended to prepare you for any of the major or minor programs we offer, but you can also begin with B-level courses that fit your interests or schedule.

Note that you do not have to take our A levels in numerical order -- for instance, you can take ENGA02H3 before, after, or at the same time as ENGA01H3.

ENGA01H3 What Is Literature? 

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

Click here for a brief video introduction to this course!

This course introduces the fundamentals of studying English at the university level, and builds the skills needed to successfully navigate English degree programs as well as a liberal arts education more broadly. Students will learn how to read texts closely and think critically; they will practice presenting their ideas in a clear, supported way; they will be exposed to a variety of texts in different forms and genres; and they will gain a working familiarity with in-discipline terminology and methodologies. Moreover, the course is an opportunity to explore the power exercised by literature on all levels of society, from the individual and personal to the political and global.

ENGA01H3 covers a wide range of texts, from Charles Dickens's Bleak House to Lin Manuel Miranda's Hamilton, from canonical sonnets to Indigenous and racialized challenges to the form. We will look at nontraditional forms like webcomics, podcasts, and a text adventure video game, all while asking "What IS literature?" and "Who is it FOR?" and "What place is there for ME in literature?"

This course will be delivered online, with lectures having synchronous ("in person") and asynchronous (at your own speed) components. You will have some synchronous tutorial meetings, which give you the opportunity to discuss your ideas in a smaller group (led by a PhD student in English) and become comfortable asking questions and trying out new ways of thinking.

ENGA01H3 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA02H3 Critical Writing About Literature 

Instructors: TBC

Click here for a brief video introduction to this course!

Intensive training in critical writing about literature. Students learn essay-writing skills (explication; organization and argumentation; research techniques; bibliographies and MLA-style citation) necessary for the study of English at the university level through group workshops, multiple short papers, and a major research-based paper. This is not a grammar course; students are expected to enter with solid English literacy skills.

Conducted in sections of 25 students.

ENGA02H3 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA03H3 Introduction to Creative Writing

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm 

An introduction to the fundamentals of creative writing, both as practice and as a profession. Students will engage in reading, analyzing, and creating writing in multiple genres, including fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and drama. This course will will include tutorial meetings, led by a graduate student in English, which give you the opportunity to discuss craft, analyze published work, do freewrites, and workshop your work with a smaller group.

Priority will be given to students who have declared, or are considering, a Major or Minor program in Creative Writing

ENGA03H3 is a required course for our Creative Writing Major and Creative Writing Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA10H3 Literature and Film for Our Time: Visions and Revisions 

Instructor: Garry Leonard

Click here for a brief video introduction to this course!

An exploration of how literature and film reflect the artistic and cultural concerns that shaped the twentieth century.

Either ENGA10H3 (or ENGA11H3, which will be offered in Winter 2022) is required for our Literature and Film Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

FALL 2022 B-LEVEL COURSES

B-level courses are intended to offer an introduction to particular areas of study in English, typically based on region, time period, genre, or theme. None of the B-level offerings have pre-requisites, and all are pitched at an introductory level. You should feel free to take B-level classes at any stage of your degree.

 

ENGB04H3 How to Read a Poem 

Instructor: Neal Dolan

An introduction to the understanding of poetry in Enlighs. By close reading of a wide range of poems from a variety of traditions, students will learn how poets use the resources of pattered language to communicate with readers in uniquely rich and powerful ways. 

ENGB08H3 American Literature to 1860

Instructor: Neal Dolan

An examination of Early American literature in historical context from colonization to the Civil War. This introductory survey places a wide variety of genres including conquest and captivity narratives, theological tracts, sermons, and diaries, as well as classic novels and poems in relation to the multiple subcultures of the period. 

Pre-1900 course

ENGB27H3 Charting Literary History I 

Instructor: Kara Gaston

An introduction to the historical and cultural developments that have shaped the study of literature in English before 1700. Focusing on the medieval, early modern, and Restoration periods, this course will examine the notions of literary history and the literary “canon” and explore how contemporary critical approaches impact our readings of literature in English in specific historical and cultural settings.

Pre-1900 course.

ENGB27H3 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGB32H3 Shakespeare in Context I

Instructor: TBC

An introduction to the poetry and plays of William Shakespeare, this course situates his works in the literary, social and political contexts of early modern England. The main emphasis will be on close readings of Shakespeare's sonnets and plays, to be supplemented by classical, medieval, and renaissance prose and poetry upon which Shakespeare drew.

Pre-1900 course.

 

ENGB38H3 The Graphic Novel 

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

A study of extended narratives in the comic book form. This course combines formal analysis of narrative artwork with an interrogation of social, political, and cultural issues in this popular literary form. Works to be studied may include graphic novels, comic book series, and comic book short story or poetry collections.

 

ENGB60H3 Creative Writing: Poetry I 

Instructor: Randy Lundy

A focused introduction to the writing of poetry. This course will enable students to explore the writing of poetry through reading, discussion, and workshop sessions.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details). If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of poetry to creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca. Please include your student number, and note if you are applying for the F or S term.

 

ENGB61H3 Creative Writing: Fiction I 

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

A focused introduction to the writing of fiction. This course will enable students to explore the writing of short fiction through reading, discussion, and workshop sessions.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details). If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of fiction or other prose writing to creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca.. Please include your student number.

 

ENGB63H3 Creative Writing: Nonfiction I 

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

A focused introduction to the writing of creative non-fiction. This course will enable students to explore the writing of creative non-fiction through reading, discussion, and workshop sessions.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details). If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of non-fiction, fiction, or other prose writing to creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca. Please include your student number.

 

ENGB70H3 How to Read a Film 

Instructor: Matthew Stoddard

An introduction to the critical study of cinema, including films from a broad range of genres, countries, and eras, as well as readings representing the major critical approaches to cinema that have developed over the past century.

ENGB70H3 is required for our Literature and Film Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGB75H3 Cinema and Modernity I

Instructor: Garry Leonard

An investigation of film genres such as melodrama, film noir, and the western from 1895 to the present alongside examples of twentieth-century prose and poetry. We will look at the creation of an ideological space and of new mythologies that helped organize the experience of modern life.

 

ENB77H3 Cinema and Colonialism 

Instructor: TBC

An introduction to cinema's relationship to colonialism, decolonization, and postcolonialism. How has film constructed, perpetuated, and challenged colonial logic? We will explore this question by examining colonial cinema, ethnography, Hollywood genres, anti-colonial film, and postcolonial film practices. 

 

FALL 2022 C-LEVEL COURSES 

Note that the pre-requisite for most C-level courses is any 6.0 university credits (if you began at UTSC before 2018, you can check into our curriculum changes). Most of our C-level courses strongly recommend the completion of ENGA01 and/or ENGA02. Some classes will have additional restrictions — make sure you check the Registrar's Calendar for specific details, and remember to check our Programs & Courses section to track your route through your chosen program.

 

ENGC01H3 Indigenous Literature of Turtle Island 

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

This course introduces students to a diverse selection of recent writing by Indigenous authors in Canada/Turtle Island, including novels, poetry, drama, essays, oratory and autobiography. Discussion of literature is grounded in Indigenous literary criticism, which addresses such issues as appropriation of voice, language, land, spirituality, orality, colonialism, gender, hybridity, authenticity, resistance, sovereignty and anti-racism.

 

ENGC27H3 Drama: Comedy 

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey 

A historical exploration of comedy as a major form of dramatic expression. Comedy, like its more august counterpart tragedy, has been subjected to centuries of theoretical deliberation about its form and function. In this course, we will read representative works of dramatic comedy and consider how different ages have developed their own unique forms of comedy. 

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC29H3 Chaucer

Instructor: Kara Gaston

Selections from The Canterbury Tales and other works by the greatest English writer before Shakespeare. In studying Chaucer's medieval masterpiece, students will encounter a variety of tales and tellers, with subject matter that ranges from broad and bawdy humour through subtle social satire to moral fable. 

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC48H3 Satire

Instructor: TBC

An investigation of the literatures and theories of the unthinkable, the reformist, the iconoclastic, and the provocative. Satire can be conservative or subversive, corrective or anarchic. This course will address a range of satire and its theories. Writers range from Juvenal, Horace, Lucian, Erasmus, Donne, Jonson, Rochester, Dryden, Swift, Pope, Gay, Haywood, and Behn to Pynchon, Nabokov and Atwood. 

Pre-1900

 

ENGC69H3 Gothic Literature 

Instructor: Christine Bolus- Reichert

A study of the Gothic tradition in literature since 1760. Drawing on texts such as Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto, Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, Henry James' The Turn of the Screw, and Anne Rice's Interview with the Vampire, this course will consider how the notion of the "Gothic" has developed across historicla periods and how Gothic texts represent the supernatural, the uncanny, and the nightmares of the unconscious mind. 

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC78H3 Dystopian Visions in Fiction and Film 

Instructor: Deirdre Flynn

An exploration of negative utopias and post-apocalyptic worlds in film and literature. The course will draw from novels such as 1984, Brave New World, Clockwork Orange, and Oryx and Crake, and films such as Metropolis, Mad Max, Brazil, and The Matrix. Why do we find stories about the world gone wrong so compelling?

 

ENGC79H3 Above & Beyond: Superheroes in Fiction & Film 

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

This course will explore the literary history and evolution of the superhero, from its roots in the works of thinkers such as Thomas Carlyle and Friedrich Nietzsche to the wartime birth of the modern comic book superhero to the contemporary pop culture dominance of transmedia experiments like the “universes” created by Marvel and DC. We will explore the superhero in various media, from prose to comics to film and television, and we will track the superhero alongside societal and cultural changes from the late 19th century to the present.

 

ENGC82H3 Topics in Cinema Studies: Canadian Cinema 

Instructor: Matthew Stoddard

A variable theme course that will feature different theoretical approaches to Cinema: feminist, Marxist, psychoanalytic, postcolonial, and semiotic. Thematic clusters include "Madness in Cinema," and "Films on Films."

Topic: This course will look at some major Canadian films from across the last fifty years. The focus will be on the social dimension of these films, particularly the ways they articulate national identity. Readings and discussions will explore how notions of national identity and national cinema address differences of language, class, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.

 

ENGC83H3 World Cinema

Instructor: Sara Saljoughi

A study of Non-Western film. This course analyzes a selection of African, Asian, and Middle Eastern films both on their own terms and against the backdrop of issues of colonialism and globalization.

 

FALL 2022 D-LEVEL COURSES 

D-level courses are smaller, more intensive explorations of a specific topic or theme. The seminar-style format means that emphasis is placed on discussion, and there is a greater expectation of independent and self-driven work. Our D-levels typically require at least 2 C-Level courses in English. Make sure to check the Registrar's Calendar for any other requirements or recommended preparation information.

 

ENGD43H3 Topics in Romanticism 1750-1850 

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

Topics in the literature and culture of the Romantic movement. Topics vary from year to year and may include Romantic nationalism, the Romantic novel, the British 1790s, or American or Canadian Romanticism.

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGD54H3 Comparative Approaches to Literature and Culture

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey 

An in-depth examination of a theme or topic through literary text, film, and/or popular culture. This seminar course will be organized around a particular topic and will include texts from a variety of traditions. Topics might include, for example, "Disability and Narrative" or "Technology in Literature and Popular Culture." 

 

ENGD55H3 Literature, Politics, Revolution

Instructor: Christine Bolus- Reichert

This advanced seminar will focus on a selected writer or a small group of writers whose literary work engages with themes of politics, revolution and/or resistance. The course will pursue the development of a single author's work over their entire career, or the development of a small group of thematically of historically related writers, and may include film and other media. Topics will vary from year to year. 

 

ENGD96H3 Iranian Cinema

Instructor: Sara Saljoughi

This course examines the development of Iranian cinema, particularly experimental and art cinema. Questions of form, and the political and social dimensions of cinema, will be considered alongside the theory of national cinemas. The course places Iranian cinema in a global context by considering it with other national cinemas. 

 

WINTER 2022 COURSES 


Click for...

A-Level Courses

B-Level Courses

C-Level Courses

D-Level Courses


WINTER 2022 A-LEVEL COURSES

A-level courses are meant to offer a wide-ranging introduction to the fundamentals of studying English. They are good starting places because they are intended to prepare you for any of the major or minor programs we offer, but you can also begin with B-level courses that fit your interests or schedule.

Note that you do not have to take our A levels in numerical order -- for instance, you can take ENGA02 before, after, or at the same time as ENGA01.

 

ENGA02H3 Critical Writing About Literature 

Instructors: Sarah King and TBC

Intensive training in critical writing about literature. Students learn essay-writing skills (explication; organization and argumentation; research techniques; bibliographies and MLA-style citation) necessary for the study of English at the university level through group workshops, multiple short papers, and a major research-based paper. This is not a grammar course; students are expected to enter with solid English literacy skills.

Note: Conducted in sections of 25 students

ENGA02H3 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA03H3 Introduction to Creative Writing 

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm 

An introduction to the fundamentals of creative writing, both as practice and as a profession. Students will engage in reading, analyzing, and creating writing in multiple genres, including fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and drama. This course will will include tutorial meetings, led by a graduate student in English, which give you the opportunity to discuss craft, analyze published work, do freewrites, and workshop your work with a smaller group.

Priority will be given to students who have declared, or are considering, a Major or Minor program in Creative Writing

ENGA03H3 is a required course for our Creative Writing Major and Creative Writing Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA11H3 Literature and Film for Our Time: Dawn of the Digital 

Instructor: Garry Leonard

Building on ENGA10H3, this course considers how literature and film responds to the artistic, cultural, and technological changes of the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Either ENGA11H3 (or ENGA10H3) is required for our Literature and Film Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

WINTER 2022 B-LEVEL COURSES 

B-level courses are intended to offer an introduction to particular areas of study in English, typically based on region, time period, genre, or theme. None of the B-level offerings have pre-requisites, and all are pitched at an introductory level. You should feel free to take B-level classes at any stage of your degree.

 

ENGB25H3 The Canadian Short Story 

Instructor: TBC

A study of the Canadian short story. This course traces the development of the Canadian short story, examining narrative techniques, the\matic concerns, and innovations that captivate writers and readers alike.

 

ENGB28H3 Charting Literary History II 

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

An introduction to the historical and cultural developments that have impacted the study of literature in English from 1700 to our contemporary moment. This course will familiarize students with the eighteenth century, Romanticism, the Victorian period, Modernism, and Postmodernism, and will attend to the significance of postcolonial and world literatures in shaping the notions of literary history and the literary “canon.”

Note: Pre-1900 course.

ENGB28H3 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGB34H3 The Short Story  

Instructor: Neal Dolan

An introduction to the short story as a literary form. This course examines the origins and recent development of the short story, its special appeal for writers and readers, and the particular effects it is able to produce.

 

ENGB35H3 Children's Literature 

Instructor: TBC

An introduction to children's literature. This course will locate children's literature within the history of social attitudes to children and in terms of such topics as authorial creativity, race, class, gender, and nationhood.

Note: Pre-1900 course.

 

ENGB37H3 Popular Literature and Mass Culture

Instructor: TBC

This course considers the creation, marketing, and consumption of popular film and fiction. Genres studies might include bestsellers; detective fiction; mysteries, romance, and horror; fantasy and science fiction; "chick lit"; popular song; pulp fiction and fanzines.

ENGB60H3 Creative Writing: Poetry I 

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal 

An introduction to the writing of poetry. This course will provide an introduction to the writing of poetry through workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details). If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of poetry to creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca. Please include your student number, and note if you are applying for the F or S term.

 

ENGB61H3 Creative Writing: Fiction I 

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal 

An introduction to the writing of fiction. This course will provide an introduction to the writing of short fiction through workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details).  If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of fiction or other prose writing to creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca. Please include your student number.

 

ENGB71H3 Writing About Movies

Instructor: TBC

In this course, students will learn to write critically about movies. We will watch movies and read film criticism, learning to write about film for various audiences and purposes. Forms of writing covered will include movie reviews, blogs, analytical essays, and research-based essays. This is a writing-intensive course that will include revision and peer review. Students will learn how to write academic essays about movies, while also learning about the goals and tools for writing about film for other audiences and venues.

 

ENGB72H3 Advanced Critical Writing about Literature

Instructor: Maria Assif 

Building on the fundamental critical writing skills students have already mastered in English A02, English B72 is designed to advance students' critical thinking and writing skills in response to a wide range of literary texts and genres. In this context, students will learn how to compose, develop, and organize sophisticated arguments; how to integrate and engage with critical sources; and how to polish their writing craft. Ultimately, students will become more confident in their writing voices and growing abilities. 

WINTER 2023 -LEVEL COURSES 

Note that the pre-requisite for most C-level courses is any 6.0 university credits (if you began at UTSC before 2018, you can check into our curriculum changes). Most of our C-level courses strongly recommend the completion of ENGA01 and/or ENGA02. Some classes will have additional restrictions — make sure you check the Registrar's Calendar for specific details, and remember to check our Programs & Courses section to track your route through your chosen program.

 

ENGC02H3 Major Canadian Authors

Instructor: Marlene Goldman

An examination of three or more Canadian writers. This course will draw together selected major writers of Canadian fiction or of other forms. Topics vary from year to year and might include a focused study of major women writers; major racialized and ethnicized writers such as African-Canadian or INdigenous writers; major writers of a particular regional or urban location or of a specific literary period. 

 

ENGC04H3 Creative Writing: Screenwriting 

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

An introduction to the craft of screenwriting undertaken through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions.

Pre-requisite: ENGB61, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC10H3 Studies in Shakespeare 

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey 

An in-depth study of selected plays from Shakespeare's dramatic corpus combined with an introduction to the critical debates within Shakespeare studies. Students will gain a richer understanding of Shakespeare's texts and their critical reception. 

Pre-1900

 

ENGC15H3 Introduction to Theory and Criticism 

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

A study of selected topics in literary criticism. Schools of criticism and critical methodologies such as New Criticism, structuralism, poststructuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, gender and sexuality studies, New Historicism, and postcolonialism will be covered, both to give students a roughly century-wide survey of the field and to provide them with a range of models applicable to their own critical work as writers and thinkers. Recommended for students planning to pursue graduate study in English literature.

 

ENGC25H3 Victorian Poetry and Prose 

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

An introduction to the poetry and nonfiction prose of the Victorian period, 1837-1901. Representative authors are studies in the context of a culture in transition in which questions about democracy, social inequality, the rights of women, national identity, imperialism, and science and religion are prominent. 

Pre-1900 course 

 

ENGC26H3 Drama: Tragedy 

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

An exploration of major dramatic tragedies in the classic and English tradition. European philosophers and literary critics since Aristotle have sought to understand and define the genre of tragedy, one of the oldest literary forms in existence. In this course, we will read representative works of dramatic tragedy and investigate how tragedy as a genre has evolved over the centuries.

Pre-1900 course.

 

ENGC28H3 The Fairy Tale

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

A study of fairy tales in English since the eighteenth century. Fairy tales have been a staple of children's literature for three centuries, though they were originally created for adults. In this course, we will look at some of the best-known tales that exist in multiple versions, and represent shifting views of gender, race, class, and nationality over time. The course will emphasize the environmental vision of fairy tales, in particular, the uses of natural magic, wilderness adventures, animal transformations, and encounters with other-than-human characters. 

 

ENGC51H3 Contemporary Arab Women Writers

Instructor: Maria Assif 

A study of Arab women writers from the late nineteenth century to the present. Their novels, short stories, essays poems, and memoirs invite us to rethink western perceptions of Arab women. Issues of gender, religion, class nationalism, and colonialism will be examined from the perspective of Arab women from both the Arab world and North America. 

 

ENGD54H43 Gender and Genre

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

An analysis of how gender and the content and structure of poetry, prose, and drama inform each other. Taking as its starting point Virginia Woolf's claim that the novel was the genre most accessible to women because it was not entirely formed, this course will consider how women writers across historical periods and cultural contexts have contributed to specific literary genres and how a consideration of gender impacts our interpretation of literary texts. 

 

ENGC56H3 Literature and Media: From Page to Screen

Instructor: TBC

An exploration of the relationship between written literature and film and television. What happens when literature influences film and vice versa, and when literary works are recast as visual media (including the effects of rewriting, reproduction, adaption, serialization and sequelization)?

 

ENGC74H3 Persuasive Writing and Community-Engaged Learning

Instructor: Maria Assif 

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of rhetoric, the art of persuasive writing and speech. Students will study several concepts at the core of rhetorical studies and sample thought-provoking work currently being done on disability rhetorics, feminist rhetorics, ethnic rhetorics, and visual rhetorics. A guiding principle of this course is that studying rhetoric helps one to develop or refine one's effectiveness in speaking and writing. Toward those ends and through a 20-hour community-engaged learning opportunity in an organization of their choice students will reflect on how this community-based writing project shapes or was shaped by their understanding of some key rhetorical concept. Students should leave the course, then with a "rhetorical toolbox" from which they can draw key theories and concepts as they pursue future work in academic, civic, or professionlal contexts. 

 

ENGC84H3 Cinema and Migration

Instructor: TBC

This course introduces students to cinema by, adn about, immigrants, refugees, migrants, and exiles. Using a comparative world cinema approach, the course explres how to aesthetics and politics of the cinema adn migration challenge theories of regional, transnational, diasporic, and global cinemas. 

 

ENGC86H3 Creative Writing: Poetry II 

Instructor: Randy Lundy

An intensive study of the writing of poetry through a selected theme, topic, or author. The course will undertake its study through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Pre-requisite: ENGB60, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC87H3 Creative Writing: Fiction II 

Instructor: TBC

An intensive study of the writing of fiction through a selected theme, topic, or author. The course will undertake its study through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Pre-requisite: ENGB61, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC88H3 Creative Writing: Nonfiction II

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

An advanced study of the craft of creative non-fiction. Through in-depth discussion, close reading of exceptional texts and constructive workshop sessions, students will explore special topics in the genre such as: fact versus fiction, writing real people, the moral role of the author, the interview process, and how to get published. Students will also produce, workshop and rewrite an original piece of long-form creative education. 

 

WINTER 2023 D-LEVEL COURSES 

D-level courses are smaller, more intensive explorations of a specific topic or theme. The seminar-style format means that emphasis is placed on discussion, and there is a greater expectation of independent and self-driven work. Our D-levels typically require at least 2 C-Level courses in English. Make sure to check the Registrar's Calendar for any other requirements or recommended preparation information.

 

ENGD48H3 Studies in Major Victorian Writers

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

Advanced study of a selected Victorian writer or small group of writers. The course will pursue the development of a single author's work over the course of his or her entire career or it may focus on a small group of thematically or historically related writers. 

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGD52H3 Cinema: The Auteur Theory 

Instructor: Deirdre Flynn

An exploration of the genesis of auteur theory. By focusing on a particular director such as Jane Campion, Kubrick, John Ford, Cronenberg, Chaplin, Egoyan, Bergman, Godard, Kurosawa, Sembene, or Bertolucci, we will trace the extent to which a director's vision can be traced through their body of work.

 

ENGD80H3 Women and Canadian Writing

Instructor: Marlene Goldman

A study of the remarkable contribution of women writers to the development of Canadian writing. Drawing from a variety of authors and genres (including novels, essays, poems, autobiographies, plays, and travel writing), this course will look at topics in women and Canadian literature in the context of theoretical questions about women's writing. 

 

ENGD95H3 Creative Writing as a Profession

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

A practical introduction to the tools, skills and knowledge-base required to publish in the digital ages and to sustain a professional creative-writing career. Topics include: the publishing landscape, pitching creative work, and employment avenues for creative writers. Will also include a workshop component (open to all genres). 

 

?❄️ YEARLONG 2021-2022 COURSES ❄️?


 

ENGD26H3Y Independent Studies: Creative Writing: Poetry 

ENGD27H3Y Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Prose

ENGD28H3Y Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Special Topics 

The three creative writing independent study courses are taught by creative writing faculty — please see the Registrar's Calendar for enrollment requirements and procedures.

 

ENGD98H3Y Senior Essay & Capstone Seminar 

Instructor: Marlene Goldman

An intensive year-long seminar that supports students in the development of a major independent scholarly project. Drawing on workshops and peer review, bi-monthly seminar meetings will introduce students to advanced research methodologies in English and will provide an important framework for students as they develop their individual senior essays. This course is strongly recommended if you're thinking about pursuing graduate studies in English.

In addition to workshops and peer review, students will have the opportunity to work individually with the instructor and with a faculty supervisor in their chosen research area.

Depending on the subject area of the senior essay, this course can be counted towards the Pre-1900 requirement. Also, please see the Registrar's Calendar for enrollment requirements and procedures.