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Current Courses

Winter Courses 2021

Winter 2021 course descriptions are live. Please email the course instructor if you have any questions!

Click HERE to preview our 2021 Summer term, and HERE for 2021 Fall Course Offerings. You can also  jump to our yearlong D-level courses for 2021-22.

Explore our different course requirements and discover specific routes through each program by clicking on the Programs & Courses menu. For specific advice regarding course selection and program requirements, please contact our Undergraduate Coordinator: english-uc@utsc.utoronto.ca.

 

☀️ SUMMER 2021 COURSES ☀️

Note that all summer courses this term are conducted online. You can contact the individual instructors to learn about meeting times and options.You can find contact information in the Faculty and Course Instructors pages.


 

ENGA01 What is Literature ☀️ 

Instructor:  Andrew Dubois

This course introduces the fundamentals of studying English at the university level, and builds the skills needed to successfully navigate English degree programs as well as a liberal arts education more broadly. Students will learn how to read texts closely and think critically; they will practice presenting their ideas in a clear, supported way; they will be exposed to a variety of texts in different forms and genres; and they will gain a working familiarity with in-discipline terminology and methodologies. Moreover, the course is an opportunity to explore the power exercised by literature on all levels of society, from the individual and personal to the political and global.

ENGA01 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA02 Critical Writing About Literature ☀️

Instructors: TBC

Intensive training in critical writing atbout literature. Students learn essay-writing skills (explication; organization and argumentation; research techniques; bibliographies and MLA-style citation) necessary for the study of English at the university level through group workshops, multiple short papers, and a major research-based paper. This is not a grammar course; students are expected to enter with solid English literacy skills.

ENGA02 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA03 Introduction to Creative Writing ☀️

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

An introduction to the fundamentals of creative writing, both as practice and as a profession. Students will engage in reading, analyzing, and creating writing in multiple genres, including fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and drama. You will have the opportunity to discuss craft, analyze published work, do freewrites, and workshop your work with a smaller group.

Pre-requisite: High school English or Creative Writing

Priority will be given to students who have declared, or are considering, a Major or Minor program in Creative Writing

ENGA03 is a required course for our Creative Writing Major and Creative Writing Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGB04 How to Read a Poem☀️

Instructor: Andrew DuBois

An introduction to the understanding of poetry in English. By close reading of a wide range of poems from a variety of traditions, students will learn how poets use the resources of patterned language to communicate with readers in uniquely rich and powerful ways.

 

ENGB30 Classical Myth & Literature ☀️

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with Greek and Latin mythology. Readings will include classical materials as well as important literary texts in English that retell classical myths.

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB70 How to Read a Film ☀️

Instructor: TBC

An introduction to the critical study of cinema, including films from a broad range of genres, countries, and eras, as well as readings representing the major critical approaches to cinema that have developed over the past century.

ENGB70 is required for our Literature and Film Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGC08 Special Topics in Creative Writing I ☀️

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

This multi-genre creative writing course, designed around a specific theme or topic, will encourage interdisciplinary practice, experiential adventuring, and rigorous theoretical reflection through readings, exercises, field trips, projects, etc.

Pre-requisite: ENGB60 or ENGB61, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC50 Studies in Contemporary American Fiction ☀️

Instructor: TBC

Developments in American fiction from the end of the 1950's to the present: the period that produced James Baldwin, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, John Updike, Norman Mailer, Ann Beatty, Raymond Carver, Don DeLillo, Toni Morrison, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Leslie Marmon Silko, among others.

 

🍁 FALL 2021 COURSES 🍁


Click for...

A-Level Courses

B-Level Courses

C-Level Courses

D-Level Courses


🍁 FALL 2021 A-LEVEL COURSES 🍁

A-level courses are meant to offer a wide-ranging introduction to the fundamentals of studying English. They are good starting places because they are intended to prepare you for any of the major or minor programs we offer, but you can also begin with B-level courses that fit your interests or schedule.

Note that you do not have to take our A levels in numerical order -- for instance, you can take ENGA02 before, after, or at the same time as ENGA01.

 

ENGA01 What Is Literature? 🍁

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

Click here for a brief video introduction to this course!

This course introduces the fundamentals of studying English at the university level, and builds the skills needed to successfully navigate English degree programs as well as a liberal arts education more broadly. Students will learn how to read texts closely and think critically; they will practice presenting their ideas in a clear, supported way; they will be exposed to a variety of texts in different forms and genres; and they will gain a working familiarity with in-discipline terminology and methodologies. Moreover, the course is an opportunity to explore the power exercised by literature on all levels of society, from the individual and personal to the political and global.

ENGA01 covers a wide range of texts, from Charles Dickens's Bleak House to Lin Manuel Miranda's Hamilton, from canonical sonnets to Indigenous and racialized challenges to the form. We will look at nontraditional forms like webcomics, podcasts, and a text adventure video game, all while asking "What IS literature?" and "Who is it FOR?" and "What place is there for ME in literature?"

This course will be delivered online, with lectures having synchronous ("in person") and asynchronous (at your own speed) components. You will have some synchronous tutorial meetings, which give you the opportunity to discuss your ideas in a smaller group (led by a PhD student in English) and become comfortable asking questions and trying out new ways of thinking.

ENGA01 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA02 Critical Writing About Literature 🍁

Course Convener: Maria Assif

Instructors: Maria Assif and TBC

Click here for a brief video introduction to this course!

Intensive training in critical writing about literature. Students learn essay-writing skills (explication; organization and argumentation; research techniques; bibliographies and MLA-style citation) necessary for the study of English at the university level through group workshops, multiple short papers, and a major research-based paper. This is not a grammar course; students are expected to enter with solid English literacy skills.

Conducted in sections of 25 students.

ENGA02 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA03 Introduction to Creative Writing 🍁

Instructor: SJ Sindu (Sinduja Sathiyaseelan)

An introduction to the fundamentals of creative writing, both as practice and as a profession. Students will engage in reading, analyzing, and creating writing in multiple genres, including fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and drama. This course will will include tutorial meetings, led by a graduate student in English, which give you the opportunity to discuss craft, analyze published work, do freewrites, and workshop your work with a smaller group.

Pre-requisite: High school English or Creative Writing

Priority will be given to students who have declared, or are considering, a Major or Minor program in Creative Writing

ENGA03 is a required course for our Creative Writing Major and Creative Writing Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA10 Literature and Film for Our Time: Visions and Revisions 🍁

Instructor: Garry Leonard

Click here for a brief video introduction to this course!

An exploration of how literature and film reflect the artistic and cultural concerns that shaped the twentieth century.

Either ENGA10 (or ENGA11, which will be offered in Winter 2021) is required for our Literature and Film Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

🍁 FALL 2021 B-LEVEL COURSES 🍁

B-level courses are intended to offer an introduction to particular areas of study in English, typically based on region, time period, genre, or theme. None of the B-level offerings have pre-requisites, and all are pitched at an introductory level. You should feel free to take B-level classes at any stage of your degree.

 

ENGB06 Canadian Literature to 1900

Instructor: Karina Vernon

A continuation of ENGB06H3 introducing students to texts written from 1900 to the present. Focusing on the development of Canada as an imagined national community, this course explores the challenges of imagining an ethical national community in the context of Canada's ongoing colonial legacy: its multiculturalism; Indigenous and Quebec nationalisms; and recent diasporic and transnational reimaginings of the nation and national belonging.

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB22 Contemporary Literature from Africa 🍁

Instructor: Neil ten Kortenaar

A study of fiction, drama, and poetry from English-speaking Africa. The course will examine the relation of English-language writing to indigenous languages, to orality, and to audience, as well as the issues of creating art in a world of suffering and of de-colonizing the narrative of history.

 

ENGB25 The Canadian Short Story 🍁

Instructor: Marlene Goldman

A study of the Canadian short story. This course traces the development of the Canadian short story, examining narrative techniques, thematic concerns, and innovations that captivate writers and readers alike.

 

ENGB27 Charting Literary History I 🍁

Instructor: Urvashi Chakravarty

An introduction to the historical and cultural developments that have shaped the study of literature in English before 1700. Focusing on the medieval, early modern, and Restoration periods, this course will examine the notions of literary history and the literary “canon” and explore how contemporary critical approaches impact our readings of literature in English in specific historical and cultural settings.

Pre-1900 course

ENGB27 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGB31 The Romance: In Quest of the Marvelous 🍁

Instructor: Kara Gaston

A study of the romance a genre whose episodic tale of marvellous adventures and questing heroes have been both criticized and celebrated. This course looks at the range of a form stretching from Malory and Spenser through Scott and Tennyson to contemporary forms such as fantasy, science fiction, postmodern romance, and the romance novel.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB32 Shakespeare in Context I🍁

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

An introduction to the poetry and plays of William Shakespeare, this course situates his works in the literary, social and political contexts of early modern England. The main emphasis will be on close readings of Shakespeare's sonnets and plays, to be supplemented by classical, medieval, and renaissance prose and poetry upon which Shakespeare drew.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB38 The Graphic Novel 🍁

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

A study of extended narratives in the comic book form. This course combines formal analysis of narrative artwork with an interrogation of social, political, and cultural issues in this popular literary form. Works to be studied may include graphic novels, comic book series, and comic book short story or poetry collections.

Note: This is a strong choice if you're interested in taking ENGD22 Special Topics in Creative Writing II in Winter term. The focus for that seminar course will be on comics and graphic novels, and Prof. Akiwenzie-Damm suggests that you take this one first for the groundwork offered.

 

ENGB52 Literature and Science 🍁

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

An exploration of the many intersections between the worlds of literature and science. The focus will be on classic and contemporary works of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama that have illuminated, borrowed from or been inspired by the major discoveries and growing cultural significance of the scientific enterprise.

 

ENGB60 Creative Writing: Poetry I 🍁

Instructor: Randy Lundy

A focused introduction to the writing of poetry. This course will enable students to explore the writing of poetry through reading, discussion, and workshop sessions.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details). If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of poetry to daniel.tysdal@utoronto.ca. Please include your student number, and note if you are applying for the F or S term.

 

ENGB61 Creative Writing: Fiction I 🍁

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

A focused introduction to the writing of fiction. This course will enable students to explore the writing of short fiction through reading, discussion, and workshop sessions.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details). If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of fiction or other prose writing to andrew.westoll@utoronto.ca. Please include your student number.

 

ENGB63 Creative Writing: Nonfiction I 🍁

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

A focused introduction to the writing of creative non-fiction. This course will enable students to explore the writing of creative non-fiction through reading, discussion, and workshop sessions.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details). If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of non-fiction, fiction, or other prose writing to andrew.westoll@utoronto.ca. Please include your student number.

 

ENGB70 How to Read a Film 🍁

Instructor: Alice Maurice

An introduction to the critical study of cinema, including films from a broad range of genres, countries, and eras, as well as readings representing the major critical approaches to cinema that have developed over the past century.

ENGB70 is required for our Literature and Film Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGB71 Writing About Movies🍁

Instructor: TBC

In this course, students will learn to write critically about movies. We will watch movies and read film criticism, learning to write about film for various audiences and purposes. Forms of writing covered will include movie reviews, blogs, analytical essays, and research-based essays. This is a writing-intensive course that will include revision and peer review. Students will learn how to write academic essays about movies, while also learning about the goals and tools for writing about film for other audiences and venues

 

ENGB75 Cinema and Modernity I🍁

Instructor: Deirdre Flynn

An investigation of film genres such as melodrama, film noir, and the western from 1895 to the present alongside examples of twentieth-century prose and poetry. We will look at the creation of an ideological space and of new mythologies that helped organize the experience of modern life.

 

🍁 FALL 2021 C-LEVEL COURSES 🍁

Note that the pre-requisite for most C-level courses is any 6.0 university credits (if you began at UTSC before 2018, you can check into our curriculum changes). Most of our C-level courses strongly recommend the completion of ENGA01 and/or ENGA02. Some classes will have additional restrictions — make sure you check the Registrar's Calendar for specific details, and remember to check our Programs & Courses section to track your route through your chosen program.

 

ENGC01 Indigenous Literature of Turtle Island 🍁

Instructor: Randy Lundy

This course introduces students to a diverse selection of recent writing by Indigenous authors in Canada/Turtle Island, including novels, poetry, drama, essays, oratory and autobiography. Discussion of literature is grounded in Indigenous literary criticism, which addresses such issues as appropriation of voice, language, land, spirituality, orality, colonialism, gender, hybridity, authenticity, resistance, sovereignty and anti-racism.

 

ENGC04 Creative Writing: Screenwriting 🍁

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

An introduction to the craft of screenwriting undertaken through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions.

Pre-requisite: ENGB61, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC06 Creative Writing: Writing for Comics  🍁

Instructor: SJ Sindu (Sinduja Sathiyaseelan)

An introduction to the writing of comics undertaken through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions.

Pre-requisite: ENGB61, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC09 Canadian Poetry 🍁

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

A study of contemporary Canadian poetry in English, with a changing emphasis on the poetry of particular time-periods, regions, and communities. Discussion will focus on the ways poetic form achieves meaning and opens up new strategies for thinking critically about the important social and political issues of our world.

 

ENGC20 The Antihero in Literature and Film 🍁

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

This course traces the evolution of the antihero trope from its earliest prototypes in pre- and early modern literature, through its Gothic and Byronic nineteenth-century incarnations, twentieth-century existentialists, noir and Beat protagonists, and up to the “difficult” men and women of contemporary film, television, and other media. We will examine the historical and cultural contexts that enabled the construction and enduring popularity of this literary archetype, particularly in relation to gender and sexuality, race, class, religion, and (post-)colonialism.

 

ENGC23 Fantasy & The Fantastic in Literature and the Other Arts 🍁

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

A study of fantasy and the fantastic from 1800 to the present. Students will consider various theories of the fantastic in order to chart the complex genealogy of modern fantasy across a wide array of literary genres (fairy tales, poems, short stories, romances, and novels) and visual arts (painting, architecture, comics, and film).

 

ENGC31 Medieval Travel Writing 🍁

Instructor: Kara Gaston

Long before the travel channel, medieval writers described exciting journeys through lands both real and imagined. This course covers authors ranging from scholar Ibn Battuta, whose pilgrimage to Mecca became the first step in a twenty-year journey across India, Southeast Asia, and China; to armchair traveller John Mandeville, who imagines distant lands filled with monsters and marvels. We will consider issues such as: how travel writing negotiates cultural difference; how it maps space and time; and how it represents wonders and marvels. Students will also have the opportunity to experiment with writing their own travelogues.

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC38 Novel Genres: Fiction, Journalism, News, and Autobiography, 1640-1750 🍁

Instructor: Anne Milne

An examination of generic experimentation that began during the English Civil Wars and led to the novel. We will address such authors as Aphra Behn and Daniel Defoe, alongside news, ballads, and scandal sheets: and look at the book trade, censorship, and the growth of the popular press.

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC42 Romanticism 🍁

Instructor: Anne Milne

A study of the Romantic Movement in European literature, 1750-1850. This course investigates the cultural and historical origins of the Romantic Movement, its complex definitions and varieties of expression, and the responses it provoked in the wider culture. Examination of representative authors such as Goethe, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, P. B. Shelley, Keats, Byron and M. Shelley will be combined with study of the philosophical and historical backgrounds of Romanticism.

Pre-1900 course

ENGC75 Freaks and Geeks:  Children in Contemporary Film and Media 🍁

Instructor: Alice Maurice

This course will look at the depiction of childhood and youth in contemporary film and television, especially focusing on films that feature exceptional, difficult, or magical children. The course will explore how popular culture represents children and teens, and how these films reflect cultural anxieties about parenting, childhood, technology, reproduction, disability and generational change. Films and television shows may include: Mommy, The Babadook, Boyhood, Girlhood, A Quiet Place, We Need to Talk About Kevin, The Shining, Looper, Elephant, Ready Player One, Stranger Things, Chappie, Take Shelter, and Moonlight.

 

ENGC79 Above & Beyond: Superheroes in Fiction & Film 🍁

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

This course will explore the literary history and evolution of the superhero, from its roots in the works of thinkers such as Thomas Carlyle and Friedrich Nietzsche to the wartime birth of the modern comic book superhero to the contemporary pop culture dominance of transmedia experiments like the “universes” created by Marvel and DC. We will explore the superhero in various media, from prose to comics to film and television, and we will track the superhero alongside societal and cultural changes from the late 19th century to the present

 

ENGC87 Creative Writing: Fiction II 🍁

Instructor: SJ Sindu (Sinduja Sathiyaseelan)

An intensive study of the writing of fiction through creative practice: short writing exercises and full stories, as well as practicing the gentle art of peer critique in a safe workshop environment. Readings and discussions will home in on techniques for drafting and editing strong stories about the things you care about most… and thereby finding your voice.

Pre-requisite: ENGB61, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC89 Creative Writing and Performance 🍁

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

This course connects writers of poetry and fiction, through discussion and workshop sessions, with artists from other disciplines in an interdisciplinary creative process, with the aim of having students perform their work.

Pre-requisite: Any B-level course in Creative Writing; students in performance-based disciplines such as Theatre and Performance (THR) and Music and Culture (VPM) may be admitted with the permission of the instructor.

 

🍁 FALL 2021 D-LEVEL COURSES 🍁

D-level courses are smaller, more intensive explorations of a specific topic or theme. The seminar-style format means that emphasis is placed on discussion, and there is a greater expectation of independent and self-driven work. Our D-levels typically require at least 2 C-Level courses in English. Make sure to check the Registrar's Calendar for any other requirements or recommended preparation information.

 

ENGD03 Topics in Contemporary Literary Theory 🍁

Instructor: Karina Vernon

A study of selected topics in recent literary theory. Emphasis may be placed on the oeuvre of a particular theorist or on the impact of a given theoretical movement; in either case, the relation of theory to literary critical practice will be considered , as will the claims made by theory across a range of aesthetic and political discourses and in response to real world demands. Recommended for students planning to pursue graduate study in English literature.

 

ENGD48 Studies in Major Victorian Writers🍁

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

Advanced study of a selected Victorian writer or small group of writers. The course will pursue the development of a single author's work over the course of his or her entire career or it may focus on a small group of thematically or historically related writers.

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGD59 Topics in American Poetry 🍁

Instructor: Neal Dolan

This seminar will usually provide advanced intensive study of a selected American poet each term, following the development of the author's work over the course of his or her entire career. It may also focus on a small group of thematically or historically related poets.

 

ENGD71 Studies in Arab North-American Literature🍁

Instructor: Maria Assif

A study of Arab North-American writers from the twentieth century to the present. Surveying one hundred years of Arab North-American literature, this course will examine issues of gender, identity, assimilation, and diaspora in poetry, novels, short stories, autobiographies and nonfiction.

 

ENGD95 Creative Writing as a Profession🍁

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

A practical introduction to the tools, skills and knowledge-base required to publish in the digital age and to sustain a professional creative writing career. Topics include: the publishing landscape, pitching creative work, and employment avenues for creative writers. Will also include a workshop component (open to all genres).

 

❄️ WINTER 2022 COURSES ❄️


Click for...

A-Level Courses

B-Level Courses

C-Level Courses

D-Level Courses


❄️ WINTER 2022 A-LEVEL COURSES ❄️

A-level courses are meant to offer a wide-ranging introduction to the fundamentals of studying English. They are good starting places because they are intended to prepare you for any of the major or minor programs we offer, but you can also begin with B-level courses that fit your interests or schedule.

Note that you do not have to take our A levels in numerical order -- for instance, you can take ENGA02 before, after, or at the same time as ENGA01.

 

ENGA02 Critical Writing About Literature ❄️

Course Convener: Maria Assif

Intensive training in critical writing about literature. Students learn essay-writing skills (explication; organization and argumentation; research techniques; bibliographies and MLA-style citation) necessary for the study of English at the university level through group workshops, multiple short papers, and a major research-based paper. This is not a grammar course; students are expected to enter with solid English literacy skills.

Note: Conducted in sections of 25 students

ENGA02 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA11 Literature and Film for Our Time: Dawn of the Digital ❄️

Instructor: Garry Leonard

Building on ENGA10, this course considers how literature and film responds to the artistic, cultural, and technological changes of the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Either ENGA11 (or ENGA10) is required for our Literature and Film Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

❄️ WINTER 2022 B-LEVEL COURSES ❄️

B-level courses are intended to offer an introduction to particular areas of study in English, typically based on region, time period, genre, or theme. None of the B-level offerings have pre-requisites, and all are pitched at an introductory level. You should feel free to take B-level classes at any stage of your degree.

 

ENGB04 How to Read a Poem ❄️

Instructor: Andrew DuBois

An introduction to the understanding of poetry in English. By close reading of a wide range of poems from a variety of traditions, students will learn how poets use the resources of patterned language to communicate with readers in uniquely rich and powerful ways.

 

ENGB28 Charting Literary History II ❄️

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

An introduction to the historical and cultural developments that have impacted the study of literature in English from 1700 to our contemporary moment. This course will familiarize students with the eighteenth century, Romanticism, the Victorian period, Modernism, and Postmodernism, and will attend to the significance of postcolonial and world literatures in shaping the notions of literary history and the literary “canon.”

Note: Pre-1900 course

ENGB28 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGB29 Shakespeare and Film ❄️

Instructor: Urvashi Chakravarty

 

ENGB34 The Short Story  ❄️

Instructor: Neal Dolan

An introduction to the short story as a literary form. This course examines the origins and recent development of the short story, its special appeal for writers and readers, and the particular effects it is able to produce.

        

         ENGB35 Children's Literature ❄️

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

An introduction to children's literature. This course will locate children's literature within the history of social attitudes to children and in terms of such topics as authorial creativity, race, class, gender, and nationhood.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB60 Creative Writing: Poetry I ❄️

Instructor: Randy Lundy

An introduction to the writing of poetry. This course will provide an introduction to the writing of poetry through workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details). If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of poetry to daniel.tysdal@utoronto.ca. Please include your student number, and note if you are applying for the F or S term.

 

ENGB61 Creative Writing: Fiction I ❄️

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

An introduction to the writing of fiction. This course will provide an introduction to the writing of short fiction through workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details).  If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of fiction or other prose writing to andrew.westoll@utoronto.ca. Please include your student number.

 

ENGB74 The Body in Literature and Film❄️

Instructor: Garry Leonard

An interdisciplinary exploration of the body in art, film, photography, narrative and popular culture. This course will consider how bodies are written or visualized as "feminine" or "masculine", as heroic, as representing normality or perversity, beauty or monstrosity, legitimacy or illegitimacy, nature or culture.

 

ENGB76 Cinema and Modernity II ❄️

Instructor: Deirdre Flynn

An investigation of film genres such as romance, gothic, and science fiction from 1895 to the present alongside examples of twentieth-century prose and poetry. We will look at the way cinema developed and created new mythologies that helped people organize the experience of modern life.

 

❄️ WINTER 2022 C-LEVEL COURSES ❄️

Note that the pre-requisite for most C-level courses is any 6.0 university credits (if you began at UTSC before 2018, you can check into our curriculum changes). Most of our C-level courses strongly recommend the completion of ENGA01 and/or ENGA02. Some classes will have additional restrictions — make sure you check the Registrar's Calendar for specific details, and remember to check our Programs & Courses section to track your route through your chosen program.

 

ENGC03 Topics in Canadian Fiction❄️

Instructor: Marlene Goldman

An analysis of Canadian fiction with regard to the problems of representation.  Topics considered may include how Canadian fiction writers have responded to and documented the local: social and historical trauma; and the problematics of representation for marginalized societies, groups and identities.

 

ENGC04 Creative Writing: Screenwriting ❄️

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

An introduction to the craft of screenwriting undertaken through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions.

Pre-requisite: ENGB61, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC07 Canadian Drama❄️

Instructor: Randy Lundy

A study of major Canadian playwrights with an emphasis on the creation of a national theatre, distinctive themes that emerge, and their relation to regional and national concerns. This course explores the perspectives of Québécois, feminist, Native, queer, ethnic, and Black playwrights who have shaped Canadian theatre.

 

ENGC11 Poetry and Popular Culture ❄️

Instructor: Andrew DuBois

Poetry is often seen as distant from daily life. We will instead see how poetry is crucial in popular culture, which in turn impacts poetry. We will read such popular poets as Ginsberg and Plath, look at poetry in film, and consider song lyrics as a form of popular poetry.

 

ENGC12 Individualism and Community in American Literature ❄️

Instructor: Neal Dolan

An exploration of the tension in American literature between two conflicting concepts of self. We will examine the influence on American literature of the opposition between an abstract, "rights-based," liberal-individualist conception of the self and a more traditional, communitarian sense of the self as determined by inherited regional, familial, and social bonds

 

ENGC15 Introduction to Theory and Criticism ❄️

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

A study of selected topics in literary criticism. Schools of criticism and critical methodologies such as New Criticism, structuralism, poststructuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, gender and sexuality studies, New Historicism, and postcolonialism will be covered, both to give students a roughly century-wide survey of the field and to provide them with a range of models applicable to their own critical work as writers and thinkers. Recommended for students planning to pursue graduate study in English literature.

 

ENGC17 The Bible and Literature II  ❄️

Instructor: Andrew DuBois

A literary analysis of the New Testament and the ways that the stories of Jesus have been reworked in British, American, European, African, Caribbean, and Indigenous literature and visual art. The Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, and the Book of Revelation will be considered as literature, and we will study later literary texts that, whether inspired by or reacting against Biblical narratives, retell them.

         Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC26 Drama: Tragedy ❄️

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

An exploration of major dramatic tragedies in the classic and English tradition. European philosophers and literary critics since Aristotle have sought to understand and define the genre of tragedy, one of the oldest literary forms in existence. In this course, we will read representative works of dramatic tragedy and investigate how tragedy as a genre has evolved over the centuries.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC37 Literature and Culture 1750-1830 ❄️

Instructor: Anne Milne

An exploration of literature and literary culture during the end of the eighteenth and beginning of the nineteenth centuries. We will trace the development of a consciously national culture, and birth of the concepts of high, middle, and low cultures. Authors may include Johnson, Boswell, Burney, Sheridan, Yearsley, Blake, and Wordsworth.

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC41 Video Games: Exploring the Virtual Narrative ❄️

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

How do video games connect to English literature? In what ways can they be “read” and assessed as storytelling texts? How do video game narratives reflect historical, cultural, and social concerns? Although active playing will be a required part of the course, students of all video game experience levels are welcome.

 

ENGC43 Ninteenth-Century Literature and Contemporary Culture ❄️

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

An investigation of how nineteenth-century literature is translated into our contemporary world through art forms like music, architecture, film, television, graphic novels, or online and social media. What is it that makes us keep returning to the past, and how does each adaptation re-make the original into something new and relevant?

         Pre-1900 course.

 

ENGC44 Self and Other in Literature and Film ❄️

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

A study of the relation between self and other in narrative fiction. This course will examine three approaches to the self-other relation: the moral relation, the epistemological relation, and the functional relation. Examples will be chosen to reflect engagements with gendered others, with historical others, with generational others, and with cultural and national others.

 

ENGC69 Gothic Literature ❄️

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

A study of the Gothic tradition in literature since 1760. Drawing on texts such as Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto, Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, Henry James' The Turn of the Screw, and Anne Rice's Interview with the Vampire, this course will consider how the notion of the "Gothic" has developed across historical periods and how Gothic texts represent the supernatural, the uncanny, and the nightmares of the unconscious mind.

            Pre-1900 course

          

           ENGC83  World Cinema ❄️

           Instructor: Sara Saljoughi

           A study of Non-Western films. This course analyzes a selection of African, Asian, and Middle Eastern films both on their own terms and against the backdrop of issues of colonialism and globalization

 

ENGC86 Creative Writing: Poetry II ❄️

Instructor: Randy Lundy

An intensive study of the writing of poetry through a selected theme, topic, or author. The course will undertake its study through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Pre-requisite: ENGB60, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC87 Creative Writing: Fiction II ❄️

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

An intensive study of the writing of fiction through a selected theme, topic, or author. The course will undertake its study through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Pre-requisite: ENGB61, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC90 Topics in Classical Myth and Literature ❄️

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

This course pursues the in-depth study of a small set of myths. We will explore how a myth or mythological figure is rendered in a range of literary texts ancient and modern, and examine each text as both an individual work of art and a strand that makes up the fabric of each given myth.

            Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC92 Film Theory ❄️

Instructor: TBC

An introduction to the major theorists and schools of thought in the history of film theory, from the early 20th century to our contemporary moment. What is our relationship to the screen? How do movies affect our self-image? How can we think about the power and politics of the moving image? We will think about these questions and others by watching movies in conjunction with theoretical texts touching on the major approaches to film theory over the last century.

 

❄️ WINTER 2021 D-LEVEL COURSES ❄️

D-level courses are smaller, more intensive explorations of a specific topic or theme. The seminar-style format means that emphasis is placed on discussion, and there is a greater expectation of independent and self-driven work. Our D-levels typically require at least 2 C-Level courses in English. Make sure to check the Registrar's Calendar for any other requirements or recommended preparation information.

 

ENGD14 Topics in Early Modern English Literature ❄️

Instructor: Urvashi Chakravarty

An advanced inquiry into critical questions relating to the development of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literature and culture. Focus may include the intensive study of an author, genre, or body of work.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGD22 Special Topics in Creative Writing II ❄️

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

This multi-genre creative writing course, designed around a specific theme or topic, will encourage interdisciplinary practice, experiential adventuring, and rigorous theoretical reflection through readings, exercises, field trips, projects, etc. The focus this term will be on comics and graphic novels.

Pre-requisite: 0.5 credit Creative Writing B-level and 0.5 credit Creative Writing C-level. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs.

Suggested preparation: ENGB38 The Graphic Novel (offered in Fall 2020) will offer an excellent foundation for this course.

 

ENGD52 Cinema: The Auteur Theory ❄️

Instructor: Deirdre Flynn

An exploration of the genesis of auteur theory. By focusing on a particular director such as Jane Campion, Kubrick, John Ford, Cronenberg, Chaplin, Egoyan, Bergman, Godard, Kurosawa, Sembene, or Bertolucci, we will trace the extent to which a director's vision can be traced through their body of work.

 

ENGD53 Studies in Popular Genres ❄️

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

Advanced study of a genre or genres not typically categorized as “literature”, including different theoretical approaches and/or the historical development of a genre. For Winter 2021, we're going to be talking about plague narratives... stay tuned for more details!

 

ENGD54 Comparative Approaches to Literature & Culture ❄️

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

An in-depth examination of a theme or topic though literary texts, films, and/or popular culture. This seminar course will be organized around a particular topic and will include texts from a variety of traditions. Topics might include, for example, “Disability and Narrative” or “Technology in Literature and Popular Culture.”

 

ENGD59 Topics in American Poetry ❄️

Instructor: Andrew DuBois

This seminar will usually provide advanced intensive study of a selected American poet each term, following the development of the author's work over the course of his or her entire career. It may also focus on a small group of thematically or historically related poets.

 

ENGD94 Stranger Than Fiction: The Documentary Film ❄️

Instructor: Alice Maurice

The study of films from major movements in the documentary tradition, including ethnography, cinema vérité, social documentary, the video diary, and "reality television". The course will examine the tensions between reality and representation, art and politics, technology and narrative, film and audience.

Recommended Preparation: A film course at the B- or C-level

 

ENGD95 Creative Writing as a Profession ❄️

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

A practical introduction to the tools, skills and knowledge-base required to publish in the digital age and to sustain a professional creative writing career. Topics include: the publishing landscape, pitching creative work, and employment avenues for creative writers. Will also include a workshop component (open to all genres).

 

ENGD96 Iranian Cinema ❄️

Instructor: Sara Saljoughi

This course examines the development of Iranian cinema, particularly experimental and art cinema. Questions of form, and the political and social dimensions of cinema, will be considered alongside the theory of national cinemas. The course places Iranian cinema in a global context by considering it with other national cinemas.

Pre-requisite: A film course at the B- or C-level

 

🍁❄️ YEARLONG 2021-2022 COURSES ❄️🍁


 

ENGD26 Independent Studies: Creative Writing: Poetry 🍁❄️

ENGD27 Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Prose 🍁❄️

ENGD28 Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Special Topics 🍁❄️

The three creative writing independent study courses are taught by creative writing faculty — please see the Registrar's Calendar for enrollment requirements and procedures.

 

ENGD02 Teaching Academic Writing: Theories, Methods and Service Learning 🍁❄️

Instructor: Maria Assif

This yearlong course explores the theories and practices of teaching academic writing, mostly in middle and secondary school contexts as well as university writing instruction and/or tutoring in writing. Through its 60-hour service-learning component, the course also provides student educators the practical opportunities for the planning and delivering of these instruction techniques in different teaching contexts. This is a great opportunity for students looking for practical applications to theoretical concepts, teaching-related opportunities in Canada and abroad, and courses aligned with the upcoming joint program in English and Teaching (2020-2021). Students in ENGD02 will gain an inter-disciplinary approach to writing and a service-learning component that helps foster connections with the larger community.

If you're considering a career in teaching, you might also want to check into the Combined Degree Program with OISE's Master of Teaching.

 

ENGD98 Senior Essay & Capstone Seminar 🍁❄️

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

An intensive year-long seminar that supports students in the development of a major independent scholarly project. Drawing on workshops and peer review, bi-monthly seminar meetings will introduce students to advanced research methodologies in English and will provide an important framework for students as they develop their individual senior essays. This course is strongly recommended if you're thinking about pursuing graduate studies in English.

In addition to workshops and peer review, students will have the opportunity to work individually with the instructor and with a faculty supervisor in their chosen research area.

Depending on the subject area of the senior essay, this course can be counted towards the Pre-1900 requirement. Also, please see the Registrar's Calendar for enrollment requirements and procedures.