Current Courses

Click HERE for 2018 Fall Courses, and HERE for 2019 Winter Courses

 

2018-19 TEACHING STAFF

Instructor Office Email 2018-19 Courses

Maria Assif 

HW319

massif@utsc.utoronto.ca

ENGA02H3S, ENGC51H3S

Christine Bolus-Reichert  

HW329

bolus@utsc.utoronto.ca

ENGB37H3F, ENGC22H3F, ENGC69H3S, ENGD55H3S

Neal Dolan   

HW317

dolan@utsc.utoronto.ca

ENGB08H3F, ENGB09H3S

Andrew Du Bois 

HW318

dubois@utsc.utoronto.ca

ENGD07H3F

Deirdre Flynn     

HW334

deirdre.flynn@utoronto.ca

ENGB76H3F, ENGC44H3S, ENGC78H3S

Kara Gaston

HW323

kgaston@utsc.utoronto.ca

ENGB31H3F, ENGC30H3F, ENGC40H3S, ENGD30H3S

Marlene Goldman

HW321

mgoldman@chass.utoronto.ca

ENGC02H3F, ENGB07H3S, ENGD80H3S

Sarah King

AC210C

sking@utsc.utoronto.ca

ENGA02H3F

Neil ten Kortenaar 

HW330

kortenaar@utsc.utoronto.ca

ENGB19H3F, ENGB22H3S

Katherine Larson

HW322

katie.larson@utoronto.ca

ENGC34H3F

Garry Leonard 

HW334

leonard@utsc.utoronto.ca

ENGA10H3F, ENGA11H3S

Alice Maurice 

HW326

maurice@utsc.utoronto.ca

ENGC91H3F, ENGD94H3F, ENGB70H3S

Anne Milne

HW321

ENGC59H3F, ENGD18H3F, ENGC37H3S

Sonja Nikkila

HW333

sonja.nikkila@utoronto.ca

ENGA01H3F, ENGC15H3F, ENGD98Y, ENGC79H3S

Yulia Ryzhik

HW320

yulia.ryzhik@utoronto.ca

ENGB27H3F, ENGB32H3F, ENGD14H3F, ENGB28H3S, ENGB33H3S

Sara Saljoughi 

HW325

sara.saljoughi@utoronto.ca

ENGC83H3S, ENGD96H3S

Daniel Tysdal 

HW317A

dtysdal@utsc.utoronto.ca

ENGB60H3F, ENGC87H3F, ENGB61H3S, ENGC04H3S, ENGC05H3S

Karina Vernon

HW327

 kvernon@utsc.utoronto.ca

ENGC01H3S

Andrew Westoll    

HW328

awestoll@utsc.utoronto.ca

ENGB52H3F, ENGB63H3F, ENGC88H3F, ENGC87H3S, ENGD95H3S

Laura Jane Wey

HW322

laurajane.wey@utoronto.ca

ENGB30H3F, ENGC26H3F, ENGD54H3F, ENGC10H3S, ENGC27H3S
Amir Khadem   amir.khadem@utoronto.ca ENGC50H3F, ENGD03H3S
Ryan Fitzpatrick   ryan_fitzpatrick@sfu.ca ENGD58H3F

 For advice regarding course selection and program requirements, please contact Undergraduate Advisor, Sean Ramrattan at ramrattan@utsc.utoronto.ca.

 

FALL 2018 COURSES

Click for...

A-Level Courses

B-Level Courses

C-Level Courses

D-Level Courses (including year-long independent study/research courses)

FALL 2018 A-LEVEL COURSES

A-level courses are meant to offer a wide-ranging introduction to the fundamentals of studying English. They are good starting places because they are intended to prepare you for any of the major or minor programs we offer, but you can also begin with B-level courses that fit your interests or schedule.

 

ENGA01 What Is Literature?

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

This course introduces the fundamentals of studying English at the university level, and builds the skills needed to successfully navigate English degree programs as well as a liberal arts education more broadly. Students will learn how to read texts closely and think critically; they will practice presenting their ideas in a clear, supported way; they will be exposed to a variety of texts in different forms and genres; and they will gain a working familiarity with in-discipline terminology and methodologies. Moreover, the course is an opportunity to explore the power exercised by literature on all levels of society, from the individual and personal to the political and global.

 

ENGA02 Critical Writing About Literature

Instructor: Sarah King

Intensive training in critical writing about literature. Students learn essay-writing skills (explication; organization and argumentation; research techniques; bibliographies and MLA-style citation) necessary for the study of English at the university level through group workshops, multiple short papers, and a major research-based paper. This is not a grammar course; students are expected to enter with solid English literacy skills.

Note: Conducted in sections of 25 students

 

ENGA10 Literature & Film for Our Time: Visions & Revisions

Instructor: Garry Leonard

An exploration of how literature and film reflect the artistic and cultural concerns that shaped the twentieth century.

 

FALL 2018 B-LEVEL COURSES

B-level courses are intended to offer an introduction to particular areas of study in English, typically based on region, time period, genre, or theme. None of the B-level offerings have pre-requisites, and all are pitched at an introductory level. You should feel free to take B-level classes at any stage of your degree.

 

ENGB04 How to Read a Poem

Instructor: TBC

An introduction to the understanding of poetry in English. By close reading of a wide range of poems from a variety of traditions, students will learn how poets use the resources of patterned language to communicate with readers in uniquely rich and powerful ways.

 

ENGB08 American Literature to 1860

instructor: Neal Dolan

An examination of Early American literature in historical context from colonization to the Civil War. This introductory survey places a wide variety of genres including conquest and captivity narratives, theological tracts, sermons, and diaries, as well as classic novels and poems in relation to the multiple subcultures of the period.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB19 Contemporary Literature from South Asia

Instructor: Neil Ten Kortenaar

This is an introduction to literature from South Asia in English, We will look at some of the most prominent writers from India, Pakistan, and Kashmir writing today. The emphasis will be on what South Asian writers have done with the form of the novel but we will also look at Agha Shahid Ali’s poetry. The required texts include:
Salman Rushdie, Midnight’s Children (1981), the most famous novel from India in English, it retells the history of modern India as well as a story of growing up in Bombay (Mumbai) in a magic realist style
Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things (1997), the second most famous novel, set in Kerala, is about untouchability narrated from the perspective of children in a lyrical style
Aravind Adiga, White Tiger (2008) is a dark tale about the modern capitalist economy of Delhi and Bangalore
Mohsin Hamid, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia (2013) is a satire of the modern capitalist economy of Pakistan
Kamila Shamsie, Home Fire (2017) is about the Pakistani diaspora in London and the threat of terrorism
Agha Shahid Ali, The Country Without a Post Office (1997) is modern poetry by a Kashmiri-American

 

ENGB27 Charting Literary History I

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

An introduction to the historical and cultural developments that have shaped the study of literature in English before 1700. Focusing on the medieval, early modern, and Restoration periods, this course will examine the notions of literary history and the literary “canon” and explore how contemporary critical approaches impact our readings of literature in English in specific historical and cultural settings.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB30 Classical Myth & Literature

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with Greek and Latin mythology. Readings will include classical materials as well as imporatnt literary texts in English that retell classical myths.

Note: Pre-1900 Course

 

ENGB31 Romance: In Quest of the Marvelous

Instructor: Kara Gaston

The story of medieval romance involves the rise, death, and rebirth of a specific way of seeing and describing the world and knowing the self. Medieval romance has almost nothing in common with modern “romances.” Rather, this old and nearly forgotten genre consisted of rambling, fantastical stories of adventure, warfare, love affairs, and quests. Many romances also contain fantastical elements, from journeys into the underworld to zombies, faeries, and physical transformations. In the Middle Ages, romances helped readers to construct their identities, developing a sense of self as it emerges at the intersection of gender, religion, socioeconomic class, and historical context. This course tracks the relation between romance and identity through the Middle Ages in texts such as Sir Orfeo, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and the Lais of Marie de France. In order to understand who “killed” medieval romance, we will study the skewering of the genre in Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote, with its parody of medieval concepts of self. Finally, we also consider 20th and 21st century revivals of romance: Virginia Woolf’s Orlando and Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Buried Giant, asking how romance might be reborn today to help us in writing about gender, identity, and memory.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB32 Shakespeare in Context I

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

An introduction to the poetry and plays of William Shakespeare, this course situates his works in the literary, social and political contexts of early modern England. The main emphasis will be on close readings of Shakespeare's sonnets and plays, to be supplemented by classical, medieval, and renaissance prose and poetry upon which Shakespeare drew.

Note: Pre-1900 course.

 

ENGB37 Popular Literature & Mass Culture: Apocalyptic Fiction

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

Human beings have always tried to imagine the end of the world, much as they have the beginning. But end-of-the-world fictions did not become a significant part of English-speaking societies until after the advent of the Industrial Revolution, which also brought with it new theories about history and a new literary genre, science fiction, in which the future is extrapolated from present conditions. This course considers six representative works of apocalyptic science fiction from the end of World War II to the present, focusing in particular on how human societies adapt in the aftermath of catastrophic change.

 

ENGB52 Literature & Science

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

An exploration of the many intersections between the worlds of literature and science. The focus will be on classic and contemporary works of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama that have illuminated, borrowed from or been inspired by the major discoveries and growing cultural significance of the scientific enterprise.

 

ENGB60 Creative Writing: Poetry I

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

An introduction to the writing of poetry. This course will provide an introduction to the writing of poetry through workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Note: Please be sure to check the Calendar for enrollment limits and requirements.

 

ENGB63 Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction I

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

An introduction to the craft of creative nonfiction. Through in-depth reading, discussion of exceptional texts and constructive workshop sessions, students will explore the many key elements of great true stories and produce several original works of creative nonfiction.

Note: Please be sure to check the Calendar for enrollment limits and requirements.

 

ENGB76 Cinema & Modernity II

Instructor: Deirdre Flynn

An investigation of film genres such as romance, gothic, and science fiction from 1895 to the present alongside examples of twentieth-century prose and poetry. We will look at the way cinema developed and created new mythologies that helped people organize the experience of modern life.

 

FALL 2018 C-LEVEL COURSES

Note that as a result of the curriculum changes enacted in 2018, the pre-requisite for most C-level courses is any 6.0 university credits. Some classes will have additional restrictions or recommended preparation — make sure you check the Calendar for specific details.

 

ENGC02 Major Canadian Authors

Instructor: Marlene Goldman

An examination of three or more Canadian writers. This course will draw together selected major writers of Canadian fiction or of other forms. Topics vary from year to year and might include a focused study of major women writers; major racialized and ethnicized writers such as African-Canadian or Indigenous writers; major writers of a particular regional or urban location or of a specific literary period. Specific focus for 2018 TBC.

 

ENGC15 Introduction to Theory & Criticism

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

A study of selected topics in literary criticism. Schools of criticism and critical methodologies such as New Criticism, structuralism, poststructuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, gender and sexuality studies, New Historicism, and postcolonialism will be covered, both to give students a roughly century-wide survey of the field and to provide them with a range of models applicable to their own critical work as writers and thinkers. Recommended for students planning to pursue graduate study in English literature.

 

ENGC22 Victorian Popular Fiction

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

A study of popular fiction during the Victorian period. This course examines the nineteenth-century emergence of genres of mass-market fiction, which remain popular today, such as historical romance, mystery and detective fiction, imperial adventure, fantasy, and science fiction.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC26 Drama: Tragedy

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

An exploration of major dramatic tragedies in the classic and English tradition. European philosophers and literary critics since Aristotle have sought to understand and define the genre of tragedy, one of the oldest literary forms in existence. In this course, we will read representative works of dramatic tragedy and investigate how tragedy as a genre has evolved over the centuries.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC30 Studies in Medieval Literature: Medieval Travel Writing

Instructor: Kara Gaston

In Fall 2018, this course will focus upon medieval travel writing. The literature of medieval travel describes both real and imagined meetings between diverse cultures. It represents travel as a source of spiritual and personal development, as a way of connecting to the ancient past, as an adventure, and as a way of mapping and managing space. Medieval travel writing ranges from the scrupulous observations of professionals—such as Arab diplomat Ibn Fadlan’s notes on his stay among the Vikings—to the wild fabrications of armchair travelers, such as Englishman John Mandeville, who imagines lands inhabited by cyclopes and headless men. This course will consider travel writing by figures from medieval Europe, North Africa, and Asia. We will ask how medieval literature anticipates modern discourses of tourism and travelogue, how medieval travelers imagined space and geography, and what kinds of discourses medieval writers used to talk about cultures different from their own. Students will have the opportunity to compare medieval works with modern travel television or literature.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC34 Early Modern Women and Literature 1500-1700

Instructor: Katherine Larson

A focused exploration of women's writing in the early modern period. This course considers the variety of texts produced by women (including closet drama, religious and secular poetry, diaries, letters, prose romance, translations, polemical tracts, and confessions), the contexts that shaped those writings, and the theoretical questions with which they engage.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC50 Studies in Contemporary American Fiction: Political Imagination in the American Novel

Instructor: Amir Khadem

This course examines political engagement of contemporary American novelists in the matters of both national and global conflict. Our focus is mostly on non-white writers, who tend to rethink some of the most crucial moments of political disagreement in modern America by providing a marginal/revisionist outlook. Readings include novels, Omar El Akkad’s American War, which imagines a second Civil War in the US, this time over climate change; Philip Roth’s Plot Against America, which is the alternative history of an American election during the second World War when a pro-Nazi candidate wins; Paul Beatty’s The Sellout, about an African-American activist who wants to reinstate segregation in the country; Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead, which quests for an original outlook toward the Jim Crow era; and Viet Thanh Nguyen’s The Sympathizer, an account of a Vietnamese man living a double-life as an American spy. The literary readings for the course will be supplemented with academic readings to provide historical and theoretical background for analysis of the works in class. This course’s goal is to help students enlarge and complicate their political frame of reference in encountering contemporary American literature, particularly distancing from the male, white, Protestant perspective.

 

ENGC59 Geography and Regionalism in Literature

Instructor: Anne Milne

Analysis of space and place in literature. This course studies representations of space in literature — whether geographical, regional, or topographical — that offer conceptual alternatives to the nation, state, or tribe. Please note that despite the official title “Geography and Regionalism in Literature”, the course is actually an active-learning introduction to literature and the environment and includes eating, walking, and resiliency ‘training’. We spend lots of time outdoors. There will be stuff about bees and maybe some digging in the dirt.

 

ENGC87 Creative Writing: Fiction II

Instructors: Daniel Tysdal & Andrew Westoll

An intensive study of the writing of fiction through a selected theme, topic, or author. The course will undertake its study through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 10-15 pages of your best fiction, and must be received by August 1st, 2018.

Note: Please be sure to check the Calendar for enrollment limits and requirements.

 

ENGC88 Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction II

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

An advanced study of the craft of creative non-fiction. Through in-depth discussion, close reading of exceptional texts and constructive workshop sessions, students will explore special topics in the genre such as: fact versus fiction, writing real people, the moral role of the author, the interview process, and how to get published. Students will also produce, workshop and rewrite an original piece of long-form creative non-fiction and prepare it for potential publication.

Note: Please be sure to check the Calendar for enrollment limits and requirements.

 

ENGC91 American Realisms

Instructor: Alice Maurice

An exploration of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American realism and naturalism in literary and visual culture. This course will explore the work of writers such as Henry James, William Dean Howells, Edith Wharton, Charles Chesnutt, Stephen Crane, Frank Norris, Kate Chopin, and Theodore Dreiser alongside early motion pictures, photographs, and other images from the period.

 

FALL 2018 D-LEVEL COURSES

D-level courses are smaller, more intensive explorations of a specific topic or theme. The seminar-style format means that emphasis is placed on discussion, and there is a greater expectation of independent and self-driven work. Make sure to check the Calendar for pre-requisite and recommended preparation information.

 

ENGD07 Studies in Postmodern Poetry

Instructor: Andrew Du Bois

In this iteration of D07, we will read deeply in the work of John Ashbery (1927-2017), widely regarded as the most influential English-language poet of the postmodern period. The course will take us through a wide selection of poems from his first 12 volumes. We will also read scattered poems by Ashbery's friends and contemporaries, such as Joe Brainard, Barbara Guest, and Frank O'Hara. Assessment will be based on participation (which assumes regular attendance and bringing the required text to class) and two essays of moderate length.

Required Text: John Ashbery: Collected Poems 1956-1987 (Library of America). This text is not "suggested" or "recommended" or any words like that; it is REQUIRED. Take the class, get the book.

 

ENGD14 Topics in Early Modern English Literature and Culture

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

The topic for this year’s course will be “Shakespeare and Satire.” We will read several of Shakespeare’s major plays in the context of early modern satirical traditions, their sources, influences, and afterlives. To what extent did Shakespeare engage with contemporary debates over the form and function of satire—particularly the fashionable formal verse satire, with its cultivated harshness and obscenity? How did he deploy the satirical mode in his comedies, tragedies, and “problem plays”? How do his plays compare with the more overtly satirical dramas of his contemporaries and rivals? What effect, if any, did the Bishops’ Ban on satire (1599) have on Shakespeare’s art? We will also consider satire from a theoretical perspective. Narrowly defined, satire is a literary genre that ridicules human follies and vices, ideally with the intent to reform them. But does satire have an effect, or is it the language of powerlessness? Does it foster community, or is it a tool of social exclusion? Does it work to correct social and economic injustices, or does it reinforce existing hierarchies of class, race, and gender? Is satire ultimately progressive or conservative? The answers are likely to be found somewhere in between, since satire, based on its etymology, is a mixed genre. Keeping this in mind, we will see how Shakespeare puts diverse satirical modes into conversation and develops his own satirical strategies.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGD18 Topics in the Long Eighteenth Century: Jane Austen in Context

Instructor: Anne Milne

This course aspires to locate Jane Austen and her oeuvre in a broader eighteenth-century context. We’ll explore what Austen read and where she lived, as well the material, social, and political contexts that underpin her work. Not for the faint-hearted, this is a hard-core eighteenth-century course aiming to illuminate the work of one of the few Western female authors who has pretty much always been included in the literary canon. This course is zombie-free, but there may be dancing.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGD54 Comparative Approaches to Literature & Culture: Acts of Translations

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

Translation as a literary activity is as ubiquitous as it is under-valued and under-examined. Contrary to predictions about technology rendering human translators obsolete, the translation industry has expanded steadily over the past decade, and is expected to continue its current upward trend. The goal of this course is to provide students interested in translation as a literary phenomenon with the tools to think about translation — and the various issues surrounding it — with a measure of sophistication. Selected readings from writers, translators and theorists will provide a framework for students to think and talk about translation. In addition, pertinent case studies of important translations of literary works will highlight the often difficult choices faced by translators in every act of linguistic and/or cultural transmission. Students will be asked to take up tasks of translation themselves to further understand the pressures and challenges faced by translators; the ability to work in a secondary language in addition to English is expected.

 

ENGD58 Topics in Canadian Literature: (What We Currently Call) Canadian Literature in (and out of) the City

Instructor: Ryan Fitzpatrick

Local is the name of a possibility of sharing, combined with the sharing of a dispossession. (The Invisible Committee, To Our Friends 189)
A house in this city is a witness box. (Brand, Thirsty 54)

In this class, we will look at the ways literature in Canada lives in and produces the city. Who has the right to live in the city? How do we decide how the city gets lived in? What is a city anyway? In his groundbreaking book The Production of Space, Henri Lefebvre argues that cities and spaces are not just containers for us to live in, but are instead are something we actively produce through our shared labour. In other words, we make the spaces we live in by collectively organizing and struggling over how to live together. We will read an array of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction from the 1970s to the present that wrestles with these questions to ask how writers in Canada negotiate this productivity, paying particular attention to the uneven developments and forms of difference that compose our cities. We’ll consider issues like gentrification and colonial dispossession, creativity and creative cities, spatial intimacy and engagement, spatial stories and archives, racialization and surveillance, and the rhythms of work and leisure.

Writers we’ll look at include: Dionne Brand, David Chariandy, Wayde Compton, Jeff Derksen, Mercedes Eng, Marvin Francis, Robert Kroetsch, Lee Maracle, Daphne Marlatt, bpNichol, Cecily Nicholson, Helen Potrebenko, Lisa Robertson, Gail Scott, Leanne Simpson, Zoe Todd, and Fred Wah.

 

ENGD59H3 Topics in American Poetry

Instructor: TBC

This seminar will usually provide advanced intensive study of a selected American poet each term, following the development of the author's work over the course of his or her entire career. It may also focus on a small group of thematically or historically related poets. Specific focus for 2018 TBC.

 

ENGD94 Stranger Than Fiction: The Documentary Film

Instructor: Alice Maurice

The study of films from major movements in the documentary tradition, including ethnography, cinema vérité, social documentary, the video diary, and "reality television". The course will examine the tensions between reality and representation, art and politics, technology and narrative, film and audience.

 

YEAR-LONG D-LEVEL COURSES

 

ENGD26 Independent Studies: Creative Writing: Poetry
ENGD27 Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Prose
ENGD28 Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Special Topics

The three creative writing independent study courses are taught by creative writing faculty — please see the Calendar for enrollment requirements and procedures.

 

ENGD98 Senior Essay & Capstone Seminar

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

An intensive year-long seminar that supports students in the development of a major independent scholarly project. Drawing on workshops and peer review, bi-monthly seminar meetings will introduce students to advanced research methodologies in English and will provide an important framework for students as they develop their individual senior essays.

Note: Depending on the subject area of the senior essay, this course can be counted towards the Pre-1900 requirement. Also, please see the Calendar for enrollment requirements and procedures.

 

WINTER 2019 COURSES

Click for...

A-Level Courses

B-Level Courses

C-Level Courses

D-Level Courses

WINTER 2019 A-LEVEL COURSES

A-level courses are meant to offer a wide-ranging introduction to the fundamentals of studying English. They are good starting places because they are intended to prepare you for any of the major or minor programs we offer, but you can also begin with B-level courses that fit your interests or schedule.

 

ENGA02 Critical Writing About Literature

Instructor: Maria Assif

Intensive training in critical writing about literature. Students learn essay-writing skills (explication; organization and argumentation; research techniques; bibliographies and MLA-style citation) necessary for the study of English at the university level through group workshops, multiple short papers, and a major research-based paper. This is not a grammar course; students are expected to enter with solid English literacy skills.

Note: Conducted in sections of 25 students

 

ENGA11 Literature and Film for Our Time: Dawn of the Digital

Instructor: Garry Leonard

Building on ENGA10H3, this course considers how literature and film responds to the artistic, cultural, and technological changes of the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

 

WINTER 2019 B-LEVEL COURSES

B-level courses are intended to offer an introduction to particular areas of study in English, typically based on region, time period, genre, or theme. None of the B-level offerings have pre-requisites, and all are pitched at an introductory level. You should feel free to take B-level classes at any stage of your degree.

 

ENGB07 Canadian Literature, 1900 to Present

Instructor: Marlene Goldman

A continuation of ENGB06H3 introducing students to texts written from 1900 to the present. Focusing on the development of Canada as an imagined national community, this course explores the challenges of imagining an ethical national community in the context of Canada's ongoing colonial legacy: its multiculturalism; Indigenous and Quebec nationalisms; and recent diasporic and transnational reimaginings of the nation and national belonging.

 

ENGB09 American Literature from the Civil War to the Present

Instructor: Neal Dolan

An introductory survey of major novels, short fiction, poetry, and drama produced in the aftermath of the American Civil War. Exploring texts ranging from The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn to Rita Dove's Thomas and Beulah, this course will consider themes of immigration, ethnicity, modernization, individualism, class, and community.

 

ENGB22 Contemporary Literature from Africa

Instructor: Neil ten Kortenaar

A study of fiction, drama, and poetry from English-speaking Africa. The course will examine the relation of English-language writing to indigenous languages, to orality, and to audience, as well as the issues of creating art in a world of suffering and of de-colonizing the narrative of history.

 

ENGB28 Charting Literary History II

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

An introduction to the historical and cultural developments that have impacted the study of literature in English from 1700 to our contemporary moment. This course will familiarize students with the eighteenth century, Romanticism, the Victorian period, Modernism, and Postmodernism, and will attend to the significance of postcolonial and world literatures in shaping the notions of literary history and the literary “canon.”

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB33 Shakespeare in Context II

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

A continuation of ENGB32H3, this course introduces students to selected dramatic comedies, tragedies and romances and situates Shakespeare's works in the literary, social and political contexts of early modern England. Our readings will be supplemented by studies of Shakespeare's sources and influences, short theoretical writings, and film excerpts.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB35 Children's Literature

Instructor: TBC

An introduction to children's literature. This course will locate children's literature within the history of social attitudes to children and in terms of such topics as authorial creativity, race, class, gender, and nationhood.

 

ENGB61 Creative Writing: Fiction I

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

An introduction to the writing of fiction. This course will provide an introduction to the writing of short fiction through workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Note: Please be sure to check the Calendar for enrollment limits and requirements.

 

ENGB70 How to Read a Film

Instructor: Alice Maurice

An introduction to the critical study of cinema, including films from a broad range of genres, countries, and eras, as well as readings representing the major critical approaches to cinema that have developed over the past century.

 

WINTER 2019 C-LEVEL COURSES

Note that as a result of the curriculum changes enacted in 2018, the pre-requisite for most C-level courses is any 6.0 university credits. Some classes will have additional restrictions or recommended preparation — make sure you check the Calendar for specific details.

 

ENGC01 Indigenous Literature of Turtle Island (Canada)

Instructor: Karina Vernon

This course introduces students to a diverse selection of recent writing by Indigenous authors in Canada/Turtle Island, including novels, poetry, drama, essays, oratory and autobiography. Discussion of literature is grounded in Indigenous literary criticism, which addresses such issues as appropriation of voice, language, land, spirituality, orality, colonialism, gender, hybridity, authenticity, resistance, sovereignty and anti-racism.

 

ENGC04 Creative Writing: Screenwriting

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

An introduction to the craft of screenwriting undertaken through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 10-20 pages of screenplay, play, or fiction.

Note: Please be sure to check the Calendar for enrollment limits and requirements.

 

ENGC05 Creative Writing: Poetry and New Media

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

A creative investigation into the intersections between poetry and new media (from wikis to cell phones to social media) undertaken through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 5-10 pages of your best poetry.

Note: Please be sure to check the Calendar for enrollment limits and requirements.

 

ENGC10 Studies in Shakespeare

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

An in-depth study of selected plays from Shakespeare's dramatic corpus combined with an introduction to the critical debates within Shakespeare studies. Students will gain a richer understanding of Shakespeare's texts and their critical reception. Specific focus for 2019 TBC.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC27 Drama: Comedy

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

An historical exploration of comedy as a major form of dramatic expression. Comedy, like its more august counterpart tragedy, has been subjected to centuries of theoretical deliberation about its form and function. In this course, we will read representative works of dramatic comedy and consider how different ages have developed their own unique forms of comedy.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC37 Literature and Culture, 1750-1830

Instructor: Anne Milne

An exploration of literature and literary culture during the end of the eighteenth and beginning of the nineteenth centuries. We will trace the development of a consciously national culture, and birth of the concepts of high, middle, and low cultures. Authors may include Johnson, Boswell, Burney, Sheridan, Yearsley, Blake, and Wordsworth.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC40 Medieval Life Writing

Instructor: Kara Gaston

From Augustine’s Confessions to Dante’s New Life, medieval writers developed creative means of telling their life stories. This course tracks medieval life-writing from Augustine and Dante to later figures such as Margery Kempe—beer brewer, mother of fourteen, and self-proclaimed saint—Thomas Hoccleve, author of the first description of a mental breakdown in English literature, and Christian convert to Islam Anselmo Turmeda/‘Abd Allāh al-Turjumān. In these texts, life writing is used for everything from establishing a reputation to recovering from trauma to religious polemic. The course will also explore how medieval life writing can help us to understand 21st century practices of self-representation, from selfies to social media.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC44 Self and Other in Literature and Film

Instructor: Deirdre Flynn

A study of the relation between self and other in narrative fiction. This course will examine three approaches to the self-other relation: the moral relation, the epistemological relation, and the functional relation. Examples will be chosen to reflect engagements with gendered others, with historical others, with generational others, and with cultural and national others.

 

ENGC51 Contemporary Arab Women Writers

Instructor: Maria Assif

A study of Arab women writers from the late nineteenth century to the present. Their novels, short stories, essays, poems, and memoirs invite us to rethink western perceptions of Arab women. Issues of gender, religion, class, nationalism, and colonialism will be examined from the perspective of Arab women from both the Arab world and North America.

 

ENGC69 Gothic Literature

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

A study of the Gothic tradition in literature since 1760. Drawing on texts such as Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto, Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, Henry James' The Turn of the Screw, and Anne Rice's Interview with the Vampire, this course will consider how the notion of the "Gothic" has developed across historical periods and how Gothic texts represent the supernatural, the uncanny, and the nightmares of the unconscious mind.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC78 Dystopian Visions in Fiction and Film

Instructor: Deirdre Flynn

An exploration of negative utopias and post-apocalyptic worlds in film and literature. The course will draw from novels such as 1984, Brave New World, Clockwork Orange, and Oryx and Crake, and films such as Metropolis, Mad Max, Brazil, and The Matrix. Why do we find stories about the world gone wrong so compelling?

 

ENGC79 Above and Beyond: Superheroes in Fiction and Film

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

This course will explore the literary history and evolution of the superhero, from its roots in the works of thinkers such as Thomas Carlyle and Friedrich Nietzsche to the wartime birth of the modern comic book superhero to the contemporary pop culture dominance of transmedia experiments like the “universes” created by Marvel and DC. We will explore the superhero in various media, from prose to comics to film and television, and we will track the superhero alongside societal and cultural changes from the late 19th century to the present.

 

ENGC83 World Cinema

Instructor: Sara Saljoughi

A study of Non-Western films. This course analyzes a selection of African, Asian, and Middle Eastern films both on their own terms and against the backdrop of issues of colonialism and globalization. Specific focus for 2019 TBC.

 

ENGC87 Creative Writing: Fiction II

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

An intensive study of the writing of fiction through a selected theme, topic, or author. The course will undertake its study through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 10-15 pages of your best fiction.

Note: Please be sure to check the Calendar for enrollment limits and requirements.

 

WINTER 2019 D-LEVEL COURSES

D-level courses are smaller, more intensive explorations of a specific topic or theme. The seminar-style format means that emphasis is placed on discussion, and there is a greater expectation of independent and self-driven work. Make sure to check the Calendar for pre-requisite and recommended preparation information.

 

ENGD03 Topics in Contemporary Literary Theory

Instructor: Amir Khadem

A study of selected topics in recent literary theory. Emphasis may be placed on the oeuvre of a particular theorist or on the impact of a given theoretical movement; in either case, the relation of theory to literary critical practice will be considered , as will the claims made by theory across a range of aesthetic and political discourses and in response to real world demands. Specific focus for 2019 TBC.

Note: Recommended for students planning to pursue graduate study in English literature.

 

ENGD30 Topics in Medieval Literature

Instructor: Kara Gaston

Topics in the literature and culture of the medieval period. Topics vary from year to year and might include a study of one or more authors. Specific focus for 2019 TBC.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGD55 Literature, Politics, Revolution: William Morris & Paul Kingsnorth

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

Paul Kingsnorth began his career just over 100 years after the end of William Morris’s, but the two writers have more in common than their country of birth (England). They can’t be pinned down to a single form, whether poetry, journalism, or fiction; both have experimented with taking modern English backward; both have founded movements based on their political activism (Morris’s Socialist League and Kingsnorth’s Dark Mountain Project); both have used the fantastic as a mode of active seeing—Morris in the romances he wrote in the last years of his life, such as News from Nowhere (1890) and The Wood Beyond the World (1894) and Kingsnorth in the two novels he’s written so far, The Wake (2014) and Beast (2016). Morris’s lifetime coincided with the industrial transformation of nature, and he’s preoccupied with showing why we still need it; Kingsnorth’s entire career, until recently, had been taken up with fighting to save what was left of wild places. But as he explains in Confessions of a Recovering Environmentalist and Other Essays (2017), mainstream environmentalism is failing, because it’s doing nothing to change how we think. In his view, that’s what stories can do, so we need to tell different stories. This course will focus on how each of these writers tries to change the world through their writing—to wake people up to the possibility of a different world.

 

 

ENGD80 Women and Canadian Writing

Instructor: Marlene Goldman

A study of the remarkable contribution of women writers to the development of Canadian writing. Drawing from a variety of authors and genres (including novels, essays, poems, autobiographies, biographies, plays, and travel writing), this course will look at topics in women and Canadian literature in the context of theoretical questions about women's writing. Specific focus for 2019 TBC.

 

ENGD95 Creative Writing as a Profession

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

A practical introduction to the tools, skills and knowledge-base required to publish in the digital age and to sustain a professional creative writing career. Topics include: the publishing landscape, pitching creative work, and employment avenues for creative writers. Will also include a workshop component (open to all genres).

 

ENGD96 Iranian Cinema

Instructor: Sara Saljoughi

This course examines the development of Iranian cinema, particularly experimental and art cinema. Questions of form, and the political and social dimensions of cinema, will be considered alongside the theory of national cinemas. The course places Iranian cinema in a global context by considering it with other national cinemas.