Current Courses

Fall 2020 course descriptions are live, and being updated. Please email the course instructor if you have any questions!

 

Click HERE for 2021 Winter Course Offerings, and HERE to review our 2020 Summer term.

 

You can also  jump to our yearlong D-level courses for 2020-21.

 

Explore our different course requirements and discover specific routes through each program by clicking on the Programs & Courses menu. For specific advice regarding course selection and program requirements, please contact Undergraduate Coordinator, Susan Calanza, at susan.calanza@utoronto.ca.

 

 🍁 FALL 2020 COURSES 🍁

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A-Level Courses

B-Level Courses

C-Level Courses

D-Level Courses

 

🍁 FALL 2020 A-LEVEL COURSES 🍁

A-level courses are meant to offer a wide-ranging introduction to the fundamentals of studying English. They are good starting places because they are intended to prepare you for any of the major or minor programs we offer, but you can also begin with B-level courses that fit your interests or schedule.

Note that you do not have to take our A levels in numerical order -- for instance, you can take ENGA02 before, after, or at the same time as ENGA01.

 

ENGA01 What Is Literature? 🍁

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

This course introduces the fundamentals of studying English at the university level, and builds the skills needed to successfully navigate English degree programs as well as a liberal arts education more broadly. Students will learn how to read texts closely and think critically; they will practice presenting their ideas in a clear, supported way; they will be exposed to a variety of texts in different forms and genres; and they will gain a working familiarity with in-discipline terminology and methodologies. Moreover, the course is an opportunity to explore the power exercised by literature on all levels of society, from the individual and personal to the political and global.

ENGA01 covers a wide range of texts, from Charles Dickens's Bleak House to Lin Manuel Miranda's Hamilton, from canonical sonnets to Indigenous and racialized challenges to the form.We will look at nontraditional forms like webcomics, podcasts, and a text adventure video game, all while asking "What IS literature?" and "Who is it FOR?" and "What place is there for ME in literature?"

This course will be delivered online, with lectures having synchronous ("in person") and asynchronous (at your own speed) components. You will have some synchronous tutorial meetings, which give you the opportunity to discuss your ideas in a smaller group (led by a PhD student in English) and become comfortable asking questions and trying out new ways of thinking.

ENGA01 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA02 Critical Writing About Literature 🍁

Course Convener: Maria Assif

Instructors: Katherine Shwetz, Julie Prior, Nicole Birch-Bayley, Alexander Sarra-Davis

Intensive training in critical writing about literature. Students learn essay-writing skills (explication; organization and argumentation; research techniques; bibliographies and MLA-style citation) necessary for the study of English at the university level through group workshops, multiple short papers, and a major research-based paper. This is not a grammar course; students are expected to enter with solid English literacy skills.

Conducted in sections of 25 students.

ENGA02 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA03 Introduction to Creative Writing 🍁

Instructor: SJ Sindu (Sinduja Sathiyaseelan)

An introduction to the fundamentals of creative writing, both as practice and as a profession. Students will engage in reading, analyzing, and creating writing in multiple genres, including fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and drama. This course will be delivered online, with lectures having synchronous ("in person") and asynchronous (at your own speed) components. You will have some synchronous and/or asynchronous tutorial meetings, led by a graduate student in English, which give you the opportunity to discuss craft, analyze published work, do freewrites, and workshop your work with a smaller group.

Pre-requisite: High school English or Creative Writing

Priority will be given to students who have declared, or are considering, a Major or Minor program in Creative Writing

ENGA03 is a required course for our Creative Writing Major and Creative Writing Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA10 Literature and Film for Our Time: Visions and Revisions 🍁

Instructor: Garry Leonard

An exploration of how literature and film reflect the artistic and cultural concerns that shaped the twentieth century.

Either ENGA10 (or ENGA11, which will be offered in Winter 2021) is required for our Literature and Film Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

 🍁 FALL 2020 B-LEVEL COURSES 🍁

B-level courses are intended to offer an introduction to particular areas of study in English, typically based on region, time period, genre, or theme. None of the B-level offerings have pre-requisites, and all are pitched at an introductory level. You should feel free to take B-level classes at any stage of your degree.

 

ENGB08 American Literature to 1860 🍁

Instructor: Neal Dolan

An examination of Early American literature in historical context from colonization to the Civil War. This introductory survey places a wide variety of genres including conquest and captivity narratives, theological tracts, sermons, and diaries, as well as classic novels and poems in relation to the multiple subcultures of the period.

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB27 Charting Literary History I 🍁

Instructor: Urvashi Chakravarty

An introduction to the historical and cultural developments that have shaped the study of literature in English before 1700. Focusing on the medieval, early modern, and Restoration periods, this course will examine the notions of literary history and the literary “canon” and explore how contemporary critical approaches impact our readings of literature in English in specific historical and cultural settings.

Pre-1900 course

ENGB27 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGB30 Classical Myth & Literature 🍁

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with Greek and Latin mythology. Readings will include classical materials as well as important literary texts in English that retell classical myths.

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB33 Shakespeare in Context II 🍁

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

An introduction to the plays and poems of William Shakespeare, this course situates his works in the literary, social, and political contexts of early modern England. The main emphasis will be on close readings of Shakespeare’s later plays (roughly from 1603 to 1611), supplemented by literary and historical sources from which Shakespeare drew inspiration. We will encounter Shakespeare at the height of his artistic powers, yet constantly challenging himself to grow and learn from one play to the next, whether by setting up new formal problems or by exploring new psychological depths and heights. Leaving behind the “festive” comedies, we will delve into the troubled world of Measure for Measure, with its pervasive sense of malaise in the state and its people, and of the great tragedies such as Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth, which elevate fundamentally human disasters to a cosmic scale, before concluding with the haunting romances The Winter’s Tale and The Tempest.

We will analyze Shakespeare’s works on the page, as texts (sometimes in various versions), and in the context of early modern theatrical performance, and will consider some of the plays’ creative afterlives, contemporary adaptations, and film. Throughout the course we will explore some of the perennial questions and concerns of Shakespeare’s works, such as individual consciousness and conscience, family and relationships, good and bad government, war and violence, race, gender and sexuality.

This course will be delivered online, with both synchronous ("in person") and asynchronous (at your own speed) components, including lecture, discussion, and online modules and activities.

Note: This course is a continuation of ENGB32 but can be taken independently

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB37 Popular Literature and Mass Culture: Apocalyptic Fiction 🍁

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

Human beings have always tried to imagine the end of the world, much as they have the beginning. But end-of-the-world fictions did not become a significant part of English-speaking societies until after the advent of the Industrial Revolution, which brought with it new theories about history and a new literary genre, science fiction, in which the future is extrapolated from present conditions. This course considers representative works of apocalyptic science fiction from the end of World War II to the present, focusing in particular on how human societies adapt in the aftermath of catastrophic change.

Students will progress through short course modules sequentially, completing tasks (most ungraded) that allow them to continue to the next part. Students may join weekly discussions online, but are not required to do so. Major assignments include a midterm term exam in three parts (300-500 words per answer); an essay (personal or analytical, 4-6 pages) or story (5-10 pages); and a take-home final exam in which students choose any three works from the course (films or novels) to reflect on the meanings of end-of-the-world stories.

 

ENGB38 The Graphic Novel 🍁

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

A study of extended narratives in the comic book form. This course combines formal analysis of narrative artwork with an interrogation of social, political, and cultural issues in this popular literary form. Works to be studied may include graphic novels, comic book series, and comic book short story or poetry collections.

 

ENGB52 Literature and Science 🍁

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

An exploration of the many intersections between the worlds of literature and science. The focus will be on classic and contemporary works of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama that have illuminated, borrowed from or been inspired by the major discoveries and growing cultural significance of the scientific enterprise.

 

ENGB60 Creative Writing: Poetry I 🍁

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

A focused introduction to the writing of poetry. This course will enable students to explore the writing of poetry through reading, discussion, and workshop sessions.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details). If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of poetry to daniel.tysdal@utoronto.ca. Please include your student number, and note if you are applying for the F or S term.

 

ENGB61 Creative Writing: Fiction I 🍁

Instructor: SJ Sindu (Sinduja Sathiyaseelan)

A focused introduction to the writing of fiction. This course will enable students to explore the writing of short fiction through reading, discussion, and workshop sessions.

This course will be delivered online, with lectures having synchronous ("in person") and asynchronous (at your own speed) components.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details). If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of fiction or other prose writing to sindu.sathiyaseelan@utoronto.ca (for F term) or andrew.westoll@utoronto.ca (for S term). Please include your student number.

 

ENGB63 Creative Writing: Nonfiction I 🍁

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

A focused introduction to the writing of creative non-fiction. This course will enable students to explore the writing of creative non-fiction through reading, discussion, and workshop sessions.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details). If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of non-fiction, fiction, or other prose writing to andrew.westoll@utoronto.ca. Please include your student number.

 

ENGB70 How to Read a Film 🍁

Instructor: Sara Saljoughi

An introduction to the critical study of cinema, including films from a broad range of genres, countries, and eras, as well as readings representing the major critical approaches to cinema that have developed over the past century.

ENGB70 is required for our Literature and Film Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

 🍁 FALL 2020 C-LEVEL COURSES 🍁

Note that the pre-requisite for most C-level courses is any 6.0 university credits (if you began at UTSC before 2018, you can check into our curriculum changes). Most of our C-level courses strongly recommend the completion of ENGA01 and/or ENGA02. Some classes will have additional restrictions — make sure you check the Registrar's Calendar for specific details, and remember to check our Programs & Courses section to track your route through your chosen program.

 

ENGC02 Major Canadian Authors: Metamorphosis & Survival 🍁

Instructor: Marlene Goldman

This course offers an in-depth engagement with some of Canada’s best writers including Alice Munro, Margaret Atwood, Dionne Brand, Thomas King, and Andre Alexis, to name only a few. As we contend with the ongoing global pandemic, we will take the opportunity to come together and engage with works  that portray individuals and communities reacting to personal and social transformation. Timothy Findley’s novel The Wars, for example, features a young man from Toronto transported to the trenches on the Western Front during WWI — an event that shatters his prior relationships with his family and the world as he knows it. Similarly, Atwood’s speculative fiction Oryx & Crake opens after a virus has eradicated most of the human race; the cataclysmic events are narrated by Jimmy, the lone survivor. Alexis’ equally speculative fantasy novel Fifteen Dogs follows the adventures of a pack of dogs who have been cursed and blessed with the gift of human consciousness at the whim of two wily gods, Hermes and Apollo. All of the texts under consideration raise questions about survival; moral choices; familial relationships; human-animal and environmental connections; creativity; and endings and beginnings.

Each class, which will be taught synchronously and also available asynchronously, will offer modules and, where appropriate, synchronous opportunities to 1) explore the biography and social context of the authors; 2) examine how each writer plays with narrative elements — characterization, narration, perspective or focalization, text time, and dialogue; 3) practice close reading and reflective writing skills; and 3) chat in small groups and as a class.

Evaluation:
Online asynchronous participation (including some combination of timely responses to posts/group chat questions/ class discussion questions) = 15%
Short 1-page written responses to formal discussion question: one for each text, 250-word max = 25%
Short essay (3 pages) =  25%
Final Essay (5 pages) = 35%

 

ENGC05 Creative Writing: Poetry, Experimentation, and Activism 🍁

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

This course is a creative investigation into how, through experimentation, we can change poetry, and how, through poetry, we can change the world. Our explorations are undertaken through writing assignments, discussions, readings, and workshop sessions.

Pre-requisite: ENGB60, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC07 Canadian Drama 🍁

Instructor: Randy Lundy

A study of major Canadian playwrights with an emphasis on the creation of a national theatre, distinctive themes that emerge, and their relation to regional and national concerns. This course explores the perspectives of Québécois, feminist, Native, queer, ethnic, and Black playwrights who have shaped Canadian theatre.

 

ENGC08 Special Topics in Creative Writing I 🍁

Instructor: Randy Lundy

This multi-genre creative writing course, designed around a specific theme or topic, will encourage interdisciplinary practice, experiential adventuring, and rigorous theoretical reflection through readings, exercises, field trips, projects, etc.

Pre-requisite: ENGB60 or ENGB61, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC15 Introduction to Theory and Criticism 🍁

Instructor: Timothy Lem-Smith

This course will introduce some of the most significant literary theory and criticism of the past century (give or take a few decades). Along the way, we will encounter such prominent critical schools as Marxism, psychoanalysis, New Historicism, gender and sexuality studies, critical race theory, postcolonialism, poststructuralism, ecocriticism, and more. Readings will include works by central figures in the history of theory, including the likes of Judith Butler, Gayatri Spivak, Fredric Jameson, N. Katherine Hayles, Jacques Derrida, Bruno Latour, Toni Morrison and others. As we are introduced to these critics and their work we will trace the historical development of their ideas for thinking with, about and through literature, contemplating areas of resonance and points of contention. Central to this consideration will be the discussion of what these theories have to say, whether explicitly or implicitly, about literature, its interpretation and its sociopolitical function.

By reading and discussing a wide range of theoretical and critical materials, students will gain familiarity with a diversity of methodological approaches to literature, taking away their own distinct ideas of what theory and criticism can and should comprise.

Recommended for students planning to pursue graduate study in English literature, and required for students in our English Specialist program.

 

ENGC26 Drama: Tragedy 🍁

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

An exploration of major dramatic tragedies in the classic and English tradition. European philosophers and literary critics since Aristotle have sought to understand and define the genre of tragedy, one of the oldest literary forms in existence. In this course, we will read representative works of dramatic tragedy and investigate how tragedy as a genre has evolved over the centuries.

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC51 Contemporary Arab Women Writers 🍁

Instructor: Maria Assif

A study of Arab women writers from the late nineteenth century to the present. Their novels, short stories, essays, poems, and memoirs invite us to rethink western perceptions of Arab women. Issues of gender, religion, class, nationalism, and colonialism will be examined from the perspective of Arab women from both the Arab world and North America.

 

ENGC59 Literature and the Environment 🍁

Instructor: Anne Milne

This course introduces students to ecocriticism (the study of the relationship between literature and environment), and this term will emphasize place-making and environmental justice. The course is loosely structured around several focused topics: Land, Sustainability, Resilience, Natural and Unnatural Disasters, Diversity and Discomfort, Public and Private Spaces, Nostalgia, Activism. Students will be introduced to environmental pedagogies and alternative ways of knowing, including embodied learning. We will spend quite a bit of time outdoors especially during the first six weeks of the course. Texts will include Li-Young Lee’s “Eating Alone” and its companion poem, “Eating Together,” and J. Drew Lanham’s “9 Rules for the Black Birdwatcher” and Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones, among others.

 

ENGC78 Dystopian Visions in Fiction and Film 🍁

Instructor: Deirdre Flynn

An exploration of negative utopias and post-apocalyptic worlds in film and literature. The course will draw from novels such as 1984, Brave New World, Clockwork Orange, and Oryx and Crake, and films such as Metropolis, Mad Max, Brazil, and The Matrix. Why do we find stories about the world gone wrong so compelling?

 

ENGC87 Creative Writing: Fiction II 🍁

Instructor: Alyx Dellamonica

An intensive study of the writing of fiction through creative practice: short writing exercises and full stories, as well as practicing the gentle art of peer critique in a safe workshop environment. Readings and discussions will home in on techniques for drafting and editing strong stories about the things you care about most… and thereby finding your voice.

Fiction II will be wholly online and asynchronous, with lecture viewing, assignments and workshop feedback due at midnight every Thursday before the next class week begins. Each student will schedule one remote face to face meeting with the instructor to discuss their stories, the writing world, publishing, and their aspirations for their writing.

Pre-requisite: ENGB61, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC88 Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction II 🍁

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

An advanced study of the craft of creative non-fiction. Through in-depth discussion, close reading of exceptional texts and constructive workshop sessions, students will explore special topics in the genre such as: fact versus fiction, writing real people, the moral role of the author, the interview process, and how to get published. Students will also produce, workshop and rewrite an original piece of long-form creative non-fiction and prepare it for potential publication.

Pre-requisite: ENGB63, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC91 American Realisms 🍁

Instructor: Alice Maurice

In this course, we will explore late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literary realism and naturalism in the context of the social, cultural, technological, and political upheavals of the time. The late 19th-century saw massive shifts in American culture: from racial segregation and racially-motivated violence, to mass immigration, urbanization, increasing poverty, shifting gender roles, and the rise of visual culture and the mass media.

Exploring the work of writers such as Henry James, William Dean Howells, Edith Wharton, Charles Chesnutt, Stephen Crane, Ida B. Wells, Frank Norris, Kate Chopin, Sui Sin Far, Abraham Cahan, Theodore Dreiser, and others, this course will ask: What were the goals of American literary realism? How did the authors themselves define it, and how did they contribute to the political and artistic debates of the period? How did the writers of this era respond to and reflect upon the rise of mass media and visual culture? How were the literary movements of realism and naturalism related to the political movements and social reforms of the era? In a larger sense, we will explore the artistic and political stakes of representing “reality."

Pre-1900 course

 

 🍁 FALL 2020 D-LEVEL COURSES 🍁

D-level courses are smaller, more intensive explorations of a specific topic or theme. The seminar-style format means that emphasis is placed on discussion, and there is a greater expectation of independent and self-driven work. Our D-levels typically require at least 2 C-Level courses in English. Make sure to check the Registrar's Calendar for any other requirements or recommended preparation information.

 

ENGD18 Topics in the Long Eighteenth Century, 1660-1830: Enlightenment Orientalisms 🍁

Instructor: Anne Milne

The focus will be on eighteenth-century English readings of and representations of Persian/Ottoman (Turkish) texts and cultures. We will be utilizing and extending the cultural critical work begun by Edward Said in Orientalism in 1978. The primary texts we will be reading are Arabian Nights Entertainments (the first English translation from Antoine Galland’s French translation, 1704-6), Lady Mary Wortley Montagu’s Turkish Embassy Letters (wr. 1717-18, pub. 1763), and William Beckford’s Vathek (1786). There will be some shorter readings as well, such as poetry and excerpts from The Travels of Mirza by Abu Taleb Khan (c.1810).

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGD30 Topics in Medieval Literature -- King Arthur in History & Fiction 🍁

Instructor: Jonathan Brent

King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table have been sites of fascination, fantasy, propaganda, and social critique for over 1,000 years. This course aims to critically analyze Arthurian literature from its earliest appearances in medieval history-writing and romance to its more recent treatment by the likes of Monty Python, Marion Zimmer Bradley, and Kazuo Ishiguro. The course will highlight similarity and difference in the way the idea of King Arthur has been used across time to negotiate social and political issues, from royal authority to gender and race. How did medieval readers and writers use the story of the ancient king to bolster their own claims to power? How has the Arthur story been used to deconstruct idealized, whitewashed, or otherwise distorted representations of history? How does genre affect the presentation of Arthurian material, and how does it affect reception? We will consider questions such as these, among others.

This course will be delivered online, with synchronous meetings that include lecture and, for the most part, discussion.

Recommended Preparation: ENGC29 or ENGC30

Pre-1900 course

 

ENGD42 Studies in Major Modernist Writers 🍁

Instructor: Garry Leonard

Advanced study of a selected Modernist writer or small group of writers. The course will pursue the development of a single author's work over the course of his or her entire career or it may focus on a small group of thematically or historically related writers.

 

ENGD50 Fake Friends and Artificial Intelligence: The Human-Robot Relationship in Literature and Culture 🍁

Instructor: Marlene Goldman

This course will explore the portrayal of social robots in the cultural imagination in conjunction with literary and religious myths of creation. The topic is timely in view of the pressing and increasingly uncanny facets of non-divine, non-biological creation that attend the real-world production and marketing of social robots. While the course looks back to early literary accounts of robots in the 1960s, it concentrates on works written in or after the 1990s when, according to anthropologist Sherry Turkle, western society experienced “the development of a fully networked life” and “an evolution in robotics” (xii). Instead of “simply taking on difficult or dangerous jobs for us,” as Turkle explains, “robots would try to be our friends” (xii). This course explores the ethical, psychological, and aesthetic questions raised by our contemporary “robot moment.” To track the social, psychological and imaginative issues raised by the paradigm shifts associated with the development of social robots, this course pairs films, plays, fiction, and theory about robots with an analysis of their mythical underpinnings which frequently lead back to the biblical story of Genesis and classical stories of creation, including tales of Prometheus and the human artificer, Daedalus. The course’s primary aim entails grappling with the ethical and aesthetic questions raised by imaginative portrayals of transhuman relationships. Questions to be considered in reading literature about social robots in light of these myths include: how is creation figured? What or who is created and why? Who plays God? Who serves as Eve/Adam? Who is cast as Satan? What is the locus of the Garden? Who and what does it include and exclude? What does enclosure or escape from the Garden entail? What constitutes power/knowledge? And, finally, how does a particular narrative treatment of the social robot potentially alter our understanding of the mythical intertexts and, by extension, notions of divinity, humanity, gender, animality, and relations of kinship and care.

Readings & Films:

Louisa Hall, Speak (2015; ISBN 978-0-06-23910-9)
Isaac Asimov, I, Robot (1967, reprint 2013)
Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968)
Carel Capek, R.U.R. (1923, reprint Dover 2001)
Ex Machina
West World (HBO series)
Blade Runner
Her (available via Criterion)
Marjorie Prime

 

ENGD55 Literature, Politics, Revolution: Climate Futures 🍁

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

The writer Paul Kingsnorth’s entire career, until recently, had been taken up with fighting to save what was left of wild places. But as he explains in Confessions of a Recovering Environmentalist and Other Essays (2017), mainstream environmentalism is failing, because it’s doing nothing to change how we think. In his view, that’s what stories can do, so we need to tell different stories. This course focuses on how stories about our climate future will help to shape it, the ones we read (memoirs, essays, and speculative fiction by Kingsnorth, Amitav Ghosh, Sonali Deraniyagala, Octavia E. Butler, Kim Stanley Robinson, Mary M. Talbot and Bryan Talbot, and Doreen Vanderstoop) and the ones we write over the twelve weeks of the course: a “world-building” project in which students tell stories about their own climate futures.

Students’ contributions to the project will take whatever literary/artistic/critical form they feel will best express their vision of adaptation and survival. In addition to the seminar project, students will write four short reading responses over the course of the term and lead seminar one time (highlight part of the reading and pose three discussion questions to the class).

This course will have an IN-PERSON section and an ASYNCHRONOUS online section. Face coverings and social distancing are required for all students attending in person; in-person attendance is recommended, but not required.

 

 🍁❄️ 2020-21 YEAR-LONG D-LEVEL COURSES ❄️🍁

ENGD26 Independent Studies: Creative Writing: Poetry 🍁❄️

ENGD27 Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Prose 🍁❄️

ENGD28 Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Special Topics 🍁❄️

The three creative writing independent study courses are taught by creative writing faculty — please see the Registrar's Calendar for enrollment requirements and procedures.

 

ENGD02 Teaching Academic Writing: Theories, Methods and Service Learning 🍁❄️

Instructor: Maria Assif

This yearlong course explores the theories and practices of teaching academic writing, mostly in middle and secondary school contexts as well as university writing instruction and/or tutoring in writing. Through its 60-hour service-learning component, the course also provides student educators the practical opportunities for the planning and delivering of these instruction techniques in different teaching contexts. This is a great opportunity for students looking for practical applications to theoretical concepts, teaching-related opportunities in Canada and abroad, and courses aligned with the upcoming joint program in English and Teaching (2020-2021). Students in ENGD02 will gain an inter-disciplinary approach to writing and a service-learning component that helps foster connections with the larger community.

If you're considering a career in teaching, you might also want to check into the Combined Degree Program with OISE's Master of Teaching.

 

ENGD98 Senior Essay & Capstone Seminar 🍁❄️

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

An intensive year-long seminar that supports students in the development of a major independent scholarly project. Drawing on workshops and peer review, bi-monthly seminar meetings will introduce students to advanced research methodologies in English and will provide an important framework for students as they develop their individual senior essays. This course is strongly recommended if you're thinking about pursuing graduate studies in English.

This course will be delivered online, with both synchronous and asynchronous components. In addition to workshops and peer review, students will have the opportunity to work individually with the instructor and with a faculty supervisor in their chosen research area.

Depending on the subject area of the senior essay, this course can be counted towards the Pre-1900 requirement. Also, please see the Registrar's Calendar for enrollment requirements and procedures.

 

 

❄️WINTER 2021 COURSES❄️  

Click for...

A-Level Courses

B-Level Courses

C-Level Courses

D-Level Courses

 

❄️WINTER 2020 A-LEVEL COURSES ❄️

A-level courses are meant to offer a wide-ranging introduction to the fundamentals of studying English. They are good starting places because they are intended to prepare you for any of the major or minor programs we offer, but you can also begin with B-level courses that fit your interests or schedule.

Note that you do not have to take our A levels in numerical order -- for instance, you can take ENGA02 before, after, or at the same time as ENGA01.

 

ENGA02 Critical Writing About Literature ❄️

Course Convener: Maria Assif

Intensive training in critical writing about literature. Students learn essay-writing skills (explication; organization and argumentation; research techniques; bibliographies and MLA-style citation) necessary for the study of English at the university level through group workshops, multiple short papers, and a major research-based paper. This is not a grammar course; students are expected to enter with solid English literacy skills.

Note: Conducted in sections of 25 students

ENGA02 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGA11 Literature and Film for Our Time: Dawn of the Digital ❄️

Instructor: Garry Leonard

Building on ENGA10, this course considers how literature and film responds to the artistic, cultural, and technological changes of the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Either ENGA11 (or ENGA10) is required for our Literature and Film Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

❄️WINTER 2020 B-LEVEL COURSES ❄️

B-level courses are intended to offer an introduction to particular areas of study in English, typically based on region, time period, genre, or theme. None of the B-level offerings have pre-requisites, and all are pitched at an introductory level. You should feel free to take B-level classes at any stage of your degree.

 

ENGB04 How to Read a Poem ❄️

Instructor: Andrew DuBois

An introduction to the understanding of poetry in English. By close reading of a wide range of poems from a variety of traditions, students will learn how poets use the resources of patterned language to communicate with readers in uniquely rich and powerful ways.

 

ENGB07 Canadian Literature 1900 to Present ❄️

Instructor: Karina Vernon

A continuation of ENGB06H3 introducing students to texts written from 1900 to the present. Focusing on the development of Canada as an imagined national community, this course explores the challenges of imagining an ethical national community in the context of Canada's ongoing colonial legacy: its multiculturalism; Indigenous and Quebec nationalisms; and recent diasporic and transnational reimaginings of the nation and national belonging.

 

ENGB09 American Literature from the Civil War to the Present ❄️

Instructor: Neal Dolan

An introductory survey of major novels, short fiction, poetry, and drama produced in the aftermath of the American Civil War. Exploring texts ranging from The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn to Rita Dove's Thomas and Beulah, this course will consider themes of immigration, ethnicity, modernization, individualism, class, and community.

Prerequisite: ENGB08H3

 

ENGB19 Contemporary Literature from South Asia ❄️

Instructor: TBC

A study of literature in English from South Asia, with emphasis on fiction from India. The course will examine the relation of English-language writing to indigenous South Asian traditions, the problem of narrating a history of colonialism and Partition, and the task of transforming the traditional novel for the South Asian context.

 

ENGB28 Charting Literary History II ❄️

Instructor: Yulia Ryzhik

An introduction to the historical and cultural developments that have impacted the study of literature in English from 1700 to our contemporary moment. This course will familiarize students with the eighteenth century, Romanticism, the Victorian period, Modernism, and Postmodernism, and will attend to the significance of postcolonial and world literatures in shaping the notions of literary history and the literary “canon.”

Note: Pre-1900 course

ENGB28 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGB31 The Romance: In Quest of the Marvelous ❄️

Instructor: TBC

A study of the romance a genre whose episodic tale of marvellous adventures and questing heroes have been both criticized and celebrated. This course looks at the range of a form stretching from Malory and Spenser through Scott and Tennyson to contemporary forms such as fantasy, science fiction, postmodern romance, and the romance novel.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB35 Children's Literature ❄️

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

An introduction to children's literature. This course will locate children's literature within the history of social attitudes to children and in terms of such topics as authorial creativity, race, class, gender, and nationhood.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGB60 Creative Writing: Poetry I ❄️

Instructor: Randy Lundy

An introduction to the writing of poetry. This course will provide an introduction to the writing of poetry through workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details). If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of poetry to daniel.tysdal@utoronto.ca. Please include your student number, and note if you are applying for the F or S term.

 

ENGB61 Creative Writing: Fiction I ❄️

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

An introduction to the writing of fiction. This course will provide an introduction to the writing of short fiction through workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Prerequisite: You need to have completed ENGA03 and successfully applied to the Major or Minor program in Creative Writing (click for program details).  If you are a non-first year student and would like to apply for B-level Creative Writing courses, please submit a portfolio in the following manner: Email 5-10 pages of fiction or other prose writing to andrew.westoll@utoronto.ca. Please include your student number.

 

ENGB76 Cinema and Modernity II ❄️

Instructor: Deirdre Flynn

An investigation of film genres such as romance, gothic, and science fiction from 1895 to the present alongside examples of twentieth-century prose and poetry. We will look at the way cinema developed and created new mythologies that helped people organize the experience of modern life.

 

❄️WINTER 2020 C-LEVEL COURSES❄️

Note that the pre-requisite for most C-level courses is any 6.0 university credits (if you began at UTSC before 2018, you can check into our curriculum changes). Most of our C-level courses strongly recommend the completion of ENGA01 and/or ENGA02. Some classes will have additional restrictions — make sure you check the Registrar's Calendar for specific details, and remember to check our Programs & Courses section to track your route through your chosen program.

 

ENGC01 Indigenous Literature of Turtle Island ❄️

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

This course introduces students to a diverse selection of recent writing by Indigenous authors in Canada/Turtle Island, including novels, poetry, drama, essays, oratory and autobiography. Discussion of literature is grounded in Indigenous literary criticism, which addresses such issues as appropriation of voice, language, land, spirituality, orality, colonialism, gender, hybridity, authenticity, resistance, sovereignty and anti-racism.

 

ENGC04 Creative Writing: Screenwriting ❄️

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

An introduction to the craft of screenwriting undertaken through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions.

Pre-requisite: ENGB61, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC09 Creative Writing: Screenwriting ❄️

Instructor: Daniel Tysdal

A study of contemporary Canadian poetry in English, with a changing emphasis on the poetry of particular time-periods, regions, and communities. Discussion will focus on the ways poetic form achieves meaning and opens up new strategies for thinking critically about the important social and political issues of our world.

 

ENGC10 Studies in Shakespeare ❄️

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

An in-depth study of selected plays from Shakespeare's dramatic corpus combined with an introduction to the critical debates within Shakespeare studies. Students will gain a richer understanding of Shakespeare's texts and their critical reception.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC13 Individualism and Community in American Literature ❄️

Instructor: Neal Dolan

A survey of the literature of Native Peoples, Africans, Irish, Jews, Italians, Latinos, and South and East Asians in the U.S, focusing on one or two groups each term. We will look at how writers of each group register the affective costs of the transition from "old-world" communalism to "new-world" individualism.

 

ENGC14 Black Canadian Literature ❄️

Instructor: Karina Vernon

A study of the diverse and vibrant forms of literary expression that give voice to the Black experience in Canada, with changing emphasis on authors, time periods, Black geographies, politics and aesthetics. The range of genres considered may include the slave narrative, memoir, historical novel, Afrofuturism and “retrospeculative” fiction, poetry, drama, as well as the performance cultures of spoken word, dub, rap, DJing and turntablism.

Recommended Preparation: ENGB06 and ENGB07

 

ENGC18 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature ❄️

Instructor: TBC

Over the course of five centuries, European empires changed the face of every continent. The present world bears the traces of those empires in the form of nation-states, capitalism, population transfers, and the spread of European languages. We will consider how empire and resistance to empire have been imagined and narrated in a variety of texts.

 

ENGC21 The Victorian Novel ❄️

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

In many ways, reading novels from the first decades of Victoria’s reign (1837-1860) is like being a stranger in a strange land. People dressed differently, spoke differently, and on some very crucial points (including gender, race, and religion) thought quite differently from us. On the other hand, these novels continue to be among the most widely read works of literature even today, and some Victorian modes of thought (especially on class, work, and wealth) are uncannily familiar to 21st century eyes. We will explore novels by Charles Dickens, Anne Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell, and George Eliot (alongside modern film adaptations) in hopes of reconciling the contingency and specificity of the period with the veins of universality and timelessness running through these narratives.

 

ENGC24 Creative Writing: The Art of the Personal Essay ❄️

Instructor: SJ Sindu (Sinduja Sathiyaseelan)

This writing workshop is based on the art and craft of the personal essay, a form of creative nonfiction characterized by its commitment to self-exploration and experiment. Students will submit their own personal essays for workshop, and become acquainted with the history and contemporary resurgence of the form.

Pre-requisite: ENGB63, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC27 Drama: Comedy ❄️

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

An historical exploration of comedy as a major form of dramatic expression. Comedy, like its more august counterpart tragedy, has been subjected to centuries of theoretical deliberation about its form and function. In this course, we will read representative works of dramatic comedy and consider how different ages have developed their own unique forms of comedy.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC28 The Fairy Tale ❄️

Instructor: Christine Bolus-Reichert

A study of fairy tales in English since the eighteenth century. Fairy tales have been a staple of children’s literature for three centuries, though they were originally created for adults. In this course, we will look at some of the best-known tales that exist in multiple versions, and represent shifting views of gender, race, class, and nationality over time. The course will emphasize the environmental vision of fairy tales, in particular, the uses of natural magic, wilderness adventures, animal transformations, and encounters with other-than-human characters.

 

ENGC39 The Early Novel in Context, 1740-1830 ❄️

Instructor: Anne Milne

A contextual study of the first fictions that contemporaries recognized as being the novel. We will examine the novel in relation to its readers, to neighbouring genres such as letters, nonfiction travel writing, and conduct manuals, and to culture more generally. Authors might include Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Burney, Austen and others.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC41 Video Games: Exploring the Virtual Narrative ❄️

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

How do video games connect to English literature? In what ways can they be “read” and assessed as storytelling texts? How do video game narratives reflect historical, cultural, and social concerns? Although active playing will be a required part of the course, students of all video game experience levels are welcome.

 

ENGC45 Queer Literature & Theory ❄️

Instructor: TBC

This course focuses on queer studies in a transhistorical context. It serves as an introduction to queer theory and culture, putting queer theory into conversation with a range of literary texts as well as other forms of media and culture. This course might explore contemporary LGBTQ2+ literature, media and popular culture; the history of queer theory; and literary work from early periods to recover queer literary histories.

 

ENGC47 Modernist Poetry ❄️

Instructor: Andrew DuBois

A study of poetry written roughly between the World Wars. Poets from several nations may be considered. Topics to be treated include Modernist difficulty, formal experimentation, and the politics of verse. Literary traditions from which Modernist poets drew will be discussed, as will the influence of Modernism on postmodern writing.

Recommended Preparation: ENGB04

 

ENGC83 World Cinema ❄️

Instructor: Sara Saljoughi

A study of Non-Western films. This course analyzes a selection of African, Asian, and Middle Eastern films both on their own terms and against the backdrop of issues of colonialism and globalization.

Recommended Preparation: ENGB70

 

ENGC86 Creative Writing: Poetry II ❄️

Instructor: Randy Lundy

An intensive study of the writing of poetry through a selected theme, topic, or author. The course will undertake its study through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Pre-requisite: ENGB60, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC87 Creative Writing: Fiction II ❄️

Instructor: SJ Sindu (Sinduja Sathiyaseelan)

An intensive study of the writing of fiction through a selected theme, topic, or author. The course will undertake its study through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Pre-requisite: ENGB61, and admission to the Creative Writing Major or Minor. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs. If you have been taking courses in the Creative Writing program prior to 2020, please contact creative-writing@utsc.utoronto.ca to check on your enrollment options.

 

ENGC92 Film Theory ❄️

Instructor: Alice Maurice

An introduction to the major theorists and schools of thought in the history of film theory, from the early 20th century to our contemporary moment. What is our relationship to the screen? How do movies affect our self-image? How can we think about the power and politics of the moving image? We will think about these questions and others by watching movies in conjunction with theoretical texts touching on the major approaches to film theory over the last century.

 

❄️WINTER 2020 D-LEVEL COURSES ❄️

D-level courses are smaller, more intensive explorations of a specific topic or theme. The seminar-style format means that emphasis is placed on discussion, and there is a greater expectation of independent and self-driven work. Our D-levels typically require at least 2 C-Level courses in English. Make sure to check the Registrar's Calendar for any other requirements or recommended preparation information.

 

ENGD14 Topics in Early Modern English Literature ❄️

Instructor: Urvashi Chakravarty

An advanced inquiry into critical questions relating to the development of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literature and culture. Focus may include the intensive study of an author, genre, or body of work.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGD22 Special Topics in Creative Writing II ❄️

Instructor: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

This multi-genre creative writing course, designed around a specific theme or topic, will encourage interdisciplinary practice, experiential adventuring, and rigorous theoretical reflection through readings, exercises, field trips, projects, etc.

Pre-requisite: 0.5 credit Creative Writing B-level and 0.5 credit Creative Writing C-level. Click here for details on our Creative Writing programs.

 

ENGD52 Cinema: The Auteur Theory ❄️

Instructor: Deirdre Flynn

An exploration of the genesis of auteur theory. By focusing on a particular director such as Jane Campion, Kubrick, John Ford, Cronenberg, Chaplin, Egoyan, Bergman, Godard, Kurosawa, Sembene, or Bertolucci, we will trace the extent to which a director's vision can be traced through their body of work.

 

ENGD53 Studies in Popular Genres ❄️

Instructor: Sonja Nikkila

Advanced study of a genre or genres not typically categorized as “literature”, including different theoretical approaches and/or the historical development of a genre. For Winter 2021, we're going to be talking about plague narratives... stay tuned for more details!

 

ENGD54 Comparative Approaches to Literature & Culture ❄️

Instructor: Laura Jane Wey

An in-depth examination of a theme or topic though literary texts, films, and/or popular culture. This seminar course will be organized around a particular topic and will include texts from a variety of traditions. Topics might include, for example, “Disability and Narrative” or “Technology in Literature and Popular Culture.”

 

ENGD59 Topics in American Poetry ❄️

Instructor: Andrew DuBois

This seminar will usually provide advanced intensive study of a selected American poet each term, following the development of the author's work over the course of his or her entire career. It may also focus on a small group of thematically or historically related poets.

 

ENGD94 Stranger Than Fiction: The Documentary Film ❄️

Instructor: Alice Maurice

The study of films from major movements in the documentary tradition, including ethnography, cinema vérité, social documentary, the video diary, and "reality television". The course will examine the tensions between reality and representation, art and politics, technology and narrative, film and audience.

Recommended Preparation: A film course at the B- or C-level

 

ENGD95 Creative Writing as a Profession ❄️

Instructor: Andrew Westoll

A practical introduction to the tools, skills and knowledge-base required to publish in the digital age and to sustain a professional creative writing career. Topics include: the publishing landscape, pitching creative work, and employment avenues for creative writers. Will also include a workshop component (open to all genres).

 

ENGD96 Iranian Cinema ❄️

Instructor: Sara Saljoughi

This course examines the development of Iranian cinema, particularly experimental and art cinema. Questions of form, and the political and social dimensions of cinema, will be considered alongside the theory of national cinemas. The course places Iranian cinema in a global context by considering it with other national cinemas.

Pre-requisite: A film course at the B- or C-level

 

 

☀️ SUMMER 2020 COURSES ☀️

Note that all summer courses this term are conducted online. You can contact the individual instructors to learn about meeting times and options.You can find contact information in the Faculty and Course Instructors pages.

 

ENGA02 Critical Writing About Literature ☀️

Course Convener: Maria Assif   Instructors: Maria Assif, Katherine Shwetz, Niyosha Keyzad

Intensive training in critical writing about literature. Students learn essay-writing skills (explication; organization and argumentation; research techniques; bibliographies and MLA-style citation) necessary for the study of English at the university level through group workshops, multiple short papers, and a major research-based paper. This is not a grammar course; students are expected to enter with solid English literacy skills.

ENGA02 is a required course for our English Specialist, English Major, and English Minor. You can explore our degree requirements and routes through the program HERE.

 

ENGB12 Life Writing ☀️

Instructor: Michele McGillivray

Life-writing, whether formal biography, chatty memoir, postmodern biotext, or published personal journal, is popular with writers and readers alike. This course introduces students to life-writing as a literary genre and explores major issues such as life-writing and fiction, life-writing and history, the contract between writer and reader, and gender and life-writing.

 

ENGB34 The Short Story ☀️

Instructor: Joel Rodgers

An introduction to the short story as a literary form. This course examines the origins and recent development of the short story, its special appeal for writers and readers, and the particular effects it is able to produce.

 

ENGB61 Creative Writing: Fiction I ☀️

Instructor: Catriona Wright

A focused introduction to the writing of fiction. This course will enable students to explore the writing of short fiction through reading, discussion, and workshop sessions.

 

ENGC16 The Bible and Literature I ☀️

Instructor: Neil ten Kortenaar

A literary analysis of the Hebrew Bible (Christian Old Testament) and of texts that retell the stories of the Bible, including the Quran. We will study Biblical accounts of the creation, the fall of Adam and Eve, Noah's flood, Abraham's binding of Isaac, the Exodus from Egypt, and the Judges, Prophets, and Kings of Israel as works of literature in their own right, and we will study British, American, European, African, Caribbean, and Indigenous literary texts that, whether inspired by or reacting against Biblical narratives, retell them.

Note: Pre-1900 course

 

ENGC50 Studies in Contemporary American Fiction ☀️

Instructor: Daniel Direkoglu

Developments in American fiction from the end of the 1950's to the present: the period that produced James Baldwin, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, John Updike, Norman Mailer, Ann Beatty, Raymond Carver, Don DeLillo, Toni Morrison, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Leslie Marmon Silko, among others.

 

ENGD68 Topics in Literature and Religion ☀️

Instructor: Maria Assif

Topics might explore the representation of religion in literature, the way religious beliefs might inform the production of literature and literary values, or literature written by members of a particular religious group.

 

ENGD89 Topics in the Victorian Period ☀️

Instructor: Amy Coté

The first purpose-built English institution dedicated to raising children was the Foundling Hospital in London, chartered in 1745. However, it took until 1926 – almost two centuries – for adoption to be formalized as a legal process. Between those dates, legal developments in child custody, child apprehension and welfare, and the nascent field of social work paved the way for this formalization, but public discussions about adoption and the shape of systematic welfare programs were often negotiated in literature. This course will examine Victorian novels, stories, and non-fiction texts featuring adoption plots across both texts that we designate as “children’s literature” and those more frequently marketed to adult readers. In the process, we will track the historical construction of adoption as it complements and challenges nineteenth-century ideas of family, domesticity, and empire. We will also pay attention to the way Victorian narratives about adoption and family shape our contemporary discourse.

Note: Pre-1900 course