Alumni & Friends - Ways to get involved and give back

First Year Learning Communities

Group of students making a sign

First Year Learning Communities (FLC) help first year students to make connections within their program of study. 

The First Year Learning Communities Program is a registered program that groups first year students by their program of study in order to help students find a sense of community within their academic programs or shared identities. Pronounced as “flicks”, FLCs meet bi-weekly to participate in workshops and activities focused on academic skills development, career exploration, and socialization. These events include opportunities like Dinner With Your Professor, where students can get to know their professors and learn more about their academic journeys.

Each FLC is assigned a FLC Leader, an upper-year student from a similar program of study. This program is open to all first year students.

The 2021-22 application period will begin in June and run until August 23, 2021. Applicants will be notified of their status via email, following this deadline. Students may continue to apply following this deadline. Should you apply outside of this period, you will be added to our waiting list and notified should spaces come available.

For the 2021-22 school year, the First Year Learning Communities program will offer a combination of in-person and virtual programming (in accordance with public health guidelines). Whether you will be living on campus, commuting to campus or studying remotely, there will be opportunities for you to participate in the program. Participants can expect to participate in bi-weekly virtual workshops and bi-weekly FLC meetings (hybrid of in-person and virtual).

Students living on residence will be grouped into FLCs with other students living on residence, and can expect FLC meetings to take place in-person.

Please note that the FLC Program will continue to follow the direction of the university and public health guidelines. Programming may be adjusted to reflect changing guidelines.

“As a former high school student leader, I came into UTSC looking for the same sense of fulfilment. In my first year, I joined the First Year Learning Community as a struggling student, looking to make connections. These wonderful upper-year students and staff took their time to answer my questions, and impart knowledge into me and other first year students, and it really inspired me to want to continue in the program as a leader. I cannot imagine my UTSC journey without the FLC Program!”
- Precious Umogbai (FLC Program 2019-2020)

FAQ

First Year Learning Communities (FLC) help first-year students to make connections within their program of study. The First Year Learning Communities Program is a registered program that groups approximately 40 first-year students by their program of study in order to help students find a sense of community within their academic programs or shared identities. Pronounced as “flicks”, FLCs meet bi-weekly to participate in workshops and activities focused on academic skills development, career exploration, and socialization. These events include opportunities like Dinner With Your Professor, where students can get to know their professors and learn more about their academic journeys. Each FLC is assigned a FLC Leader, an upper-year student from a similar program of study. This program is open to all first year students.

First Year Learning Communities are divided by program of study, based on UTSC’s Programs of Study. For example, if you were admitted to the Anthropology Program, your First Year Learning Community would be the Arts, Social Sciences & Humanities FLC. Make sure to double check UTSC’s Programs of Study to see which one is best for you.

To apply, complete the First Year Learning Communities Application. The deadline for applications will be August 23 at 11:59pm. You may apply if you miss this deadline, however you will be added to our waiting list. Please note that you must be a first year student, admitted to the University of Toronto Scarborough. Please apply to the FLC that corresponds to your admission category, based on UTSC’s Programs of Study. Space in our program is limited. Successful applicants will be notified in August. 

First Year Learning Communities are open to all UTSC students in their first year of study. To remain in a FLC, you must be enrolled in classes. First Year Learning Communities are open to first year students living on and off campus.

Your participation in a First Year Learning Community will be noted on your Co-Curricular Record. To be eligible for Co-Curricular Recognition, you must regularly attend FLC events and complete a year-end reflection.

For the 2021-22 school year, the First Year Learning Communities program will offer a combination of in-person and virtual programming (in accordance with public health guidelines). Whether you will be living on campus, commuting to campus, or studying remotely, there will be opportunities for you to participate in the program. Participants can expect to participate in bi-weekly virtual workshops and bi-weekly FLC meetings (hybrid of in-person and virtual).

Students living on residence will be grouped into FLCs with other students living on residence, and can expect FLC meetings to take place in-person.

Please note that the FLC Program will continue to follow the direction of the university and public health guidelines. Programming may be adjusted to reflect changing guidelines.

Management Learning Communities are hosted by the UTSC’s Management Department. To learn more, please visit www.utsc.utoronto.ca/mgmt/first-year-learning-integration-program-flip

Your Co-Curricular Record is an official record that recognizes the skills and experiences you have had beyond the classroom. It will track your activities throughout your time at U of T. It will help you to better understand the skills you are developing and how they might apply to other contexts. Documenting your co-curricular experiences will also help you to market your skills and experiences to graduate schools and potential employers, and help you speak about them in a meaningful way on grant and bursary applications.