Back to Academic Regulations (Part II) | On to Telephone directory: frequently called numbers | Up to Index | Search the Calendar

Academic Regulations (Part III)

Examinations

Examinations are held at the end of both terms of each Summer Session and at the end of each Fall Session and each Winter Session. Students who make personal commitments during the examination period do so at their own risk. No special consideration will be given and no special arrangements made in the event of personal commitments.

Information regarding dates and times of examinations will not be given by telephone.

Students are responsible for reading the timetable carefully and appearing at the time specified. Students taking courses during the day may be required to write evening examinations and students taking evening courses may be required to write day examinations. Students may also be required to write Saturday term tests or examinations.

Examination timetable conflicts

Students scheduled to write two examinations at the same time should report their conflicts to the Assistant Registrar (Secretariat and Scheduling) (Room S416A, (416) 287-7540). Arrangements will normally be made for students to write both examinations on the same day, with a supervised break. Where the conflict involves a St. George Campus course, arrangements will normally be made for both examinations to be written at University of Toronto at Scarborough. Requests for such arrangements must be made no later than two full weeks before the commencement of examinations and will not be considered after that time.

Students with three consecutive examinations

Students scheduled to write examinations in three consecutive time slots (these are morning, afternoon, and evening) may request special arrangements. Requests for such arrangements must be made with the Assistant Registrar (Secretariat and Scheduling) no later than two full weeks before the commencement of examinations. Requests will not be considered after that time.


Special consideration regarding examinations

Students requesting special consideration because they are unable to write a final examination must submit a petition through the Registrar's Office no later than the last day of the examination period. Petitions must be accompanied by a medical certificate or other appropriate supporting evidence. Please refer to the information concerning petitions and medical certificates (page 225).

Identification cards

Students will be required to identify themselves at examinations by means of their University of Toronto photo identification card. Students who do not have this card should arrange to obtain one well in advance of the day of their first examination.

Examination room regulations

1 All students are advised to read the section of this Calendar titled Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters.

2 Students are advised to arrive at the examination room at least fifteen minutes before the scheduled examination time. Invigilators will begin the actual examination at the scheduled time.

3 No persons shall be allowed in an examination room during an examination except the students writing the examination and those supervising it.

4 Candidates shall bring their photo identification cards and place them in a conspicuous place on their desks. (Students registered in other Faculties or Colleges of the University shall bring their student cards.)

5 Bags and books are to be deposited in areas designated by the invigilator and are not to be taken to the examination desk or table. Students may dispose of their purses by placing them, closed, on the floor underneath their chairs.

6 The invigilator has the authority to assign seats to candidates.

7 No materials shall be brought into the examination room or used at an examination except those authorized by the Chief Presiding Officer or Examiner.

8 Candidates shall not communicate with one another in any manner whatever while the examinations are proceeding.

9 Candidates bringing any unauthorized material into an examination room or who assist, or obtain assistance from other candidates or from an unauthorized source, are liable to be refused permission to write the remaining part of the examination or any subsequent examinations. Such candidates are also liable to the loss of academic credit for the course, to suspension, or to expulsion from the University.

10 Candidates shall not be permitted to leave the examination room except under supervision until at least half an hour after the examination has commenced.

11 Candidates shall not leave the examination room within the final ten minutes of an examination, during which time they shall remain quietly seated at their desks.

12 At the conclusion of an examination all writing within the answer books shall cease. The invigilator may refuse to accept the papers of candidates who fail to observe this requirement.

13 Examination books and other material issued for the examination shall not be removed from the examination room without the authority of the invigilator.

14 Smoking is not permitted in the examination rooms.

Special consideration, petitions and appeals

From time to time students may need to ask for special consideration in their academic work or for exceptions to be made to the academic regulations. Such requests normally arise as a result of their being affected by something outside their control, such as illness, accident or the death of a family member. Very occasionally students may find themselves in a situation not foreseen by the College regulations or feel that they have been unreasonably affected by a deviation from University Policy or approved practice. If you find yourself in such a situation, it is important that you follow the appropriate procedures and meet any published deadlines.

Policies and deadlines for courses taken on other campuses may differ from those outlined below. See the Calendar of the Faculty of Arts & Science for regulations regarding its courses on the St. George Campus. You are responsible for observing the regulations governing any courses you take on other campuses.

You should seek special consideration only when there are circumstances which are not only beyond your control but which you could not reasonably have anticipated or overcome and which have seriously affected your studies.

A. Term work

1. If:

speak with your instructor as soon as possible to request special consideration. This is granted at his or her discretion. If you wish to appeal your instructor's decision, speak with or write to the Chair of the Division offering the course.

2. If it is close to the end of term or session and you need an extension of time to complete term work or to write a term test, your instructor jointly with the Divisional Chair may give you an extension for up to a week after the last date to submit term work.

3. If you need more than a week's extension, you must submit a formal petition (see ßD below). If your petition is granted, you will be given a deadline by which to complete the work.

B. Final examinations

1. If illness or other extenuating circumstances prevent you from writing a final examination, you may request special consideration by means of a petition (See ßD Below). This must be submitted as soon as possible and no later than the last day of the examination period.

  1. If you are affected by illness or other circumstances which do not actually prevent your writing an examination, you are required to attempt it. If, after receiving your final grade, you feel that your performance on the exam was adversely affected, you may petition to rewrite it (See ßD Below). Please note that grade reports are mailed to you only at the end of the Summer Session and the end of the Winter Session. However, final grades are available through ROSI's Line and ROSI's Page as follows:

3. If you are permitted to rewrite, the amended grade will stand, whether higher or lower.

4. Deferred examinations for all University of Toronto at Scarborough courses, including those which are being rewritten, are held as follows:

5. You must pay a fee to write any University of Toronto at Scarborough deferred examination.

6. If you are given permission to write a deferred exam, or to rewrite an exam, you must indicate your intention to write it and pay the required fee by the deadline set. Failure to respond or to pay the fee will result in loss of privilege to sit the examination.

7. You are given only one opportunity to sit a deferred exam and are expected to be available for the entire deferred examination period.

8. If you miss a deferred exam, you may petition for an extension of time to write it; normally no other form of special consideration will be granted. Permission will be granted only under exceptional circumstances and when supported by strong documentation. A petition for an extension of time to sit a deferred examination will be considered only once.

9. Under truly exceptional circumstances, students who will unavoidably be outside the Toronto area during the special examination period may petition for permission to write at an outside centre. Such a petition must detail the reasons for the request and must be submitted at least three weeks prior to the beginning of the deferred examination period. Late requests cannot be accommodated.

A non-refundable fee of $30.00 for each examination to be written at an outside centre is charged in addition to the regular deferred examination fee of $70.00. Students who are given permission to write at an outside centre are also responsible for all costs of invigilation, courier charges and other related expenses. Since these may exceed $100.00 per examination, students are advised to assess the total costs before petitioning.

C. Marks and Grades

1. Checking Marks: Term Work

If you think that your mark on a term test or assignment has been calculated incorrectly, ask your instructor to check the mark. Do this as soon as possible, and certainly before the end of term. If you wish to appeal an instructor's decision about the grading of term work, speak with or write to the Chair of the Division offering the course.

2. Copies of final examinations

Within six months of the relevant examination period you may obtain a photocopy of your final exam from the Registrar's Office. A non-refundable fee is charged.

3. Checking Marks: Final Examinations

If you think there is an error in the calculation of your final grade, within six months of the relevant examination period you may request a recheck of the calculation through the Registrar's Office on a form provided for this purpose. (It is not necessary to purchase a copy of your exam to make this request.) A fee is charged. If an error is discovered which results in a change of the final letter grade, your fee will be refunded. Whenever a grade is changed, the amended grade will stand whether it is higher or lower. Please note that before submitting any failing grade, instructors are required to re-read the final exam and recheck the calculation of term and final marks.

4. Appealing Assigned Grades

If you wish to appeal a mark on term work returned to you only after the end of term and after the instructor has submitted grades for the course, you may submit a formal petition (See ßD Below). This must be done within six months of the relevant examination period.

If, after obtaining a copy of a final examination, you wish to request that it be re-read, you may submit a petition for re-reading (See ßD Below). You must do this within six months of the relevant examination period.

When authorized, the re-reading is arranged by the Division offering the course, which also authorizes any change in grade. Normally the re-reading is done by the course instructor, unless you make a convincing argument that the work be re-read by another faculty member. Claims of prejudice must be supported in detail and wherever possible confirmed by a third party. Whenever a grade is changed, the amended grade will stand whether it is higher or lower.

5. Violations of the Grading Practices Policy

(a) If you think an instructor has violated the Grading Practices Policy, discuss your complaint with the instructor. If the violation relates to the announced schedule of assignments or the marking scheme, you must do this no later than the fourth week of classes. If it relates to changes in or divergence from the announced marking scheme, you must do this before the end of the final examination period.

(b) If this discussion does not result in a satisfactory solution, you may appeal the instructor's decision to the Chair of the Division offering the course. If this appeal does not resolve the problem, you may appeal to the Principal of the College.

(c) If you wish to withdraw from a course after the last day to withdraw without academic penalty on the grounds of a violation of the Grading Practices Policy, you must submit a formal petition (See ßD Below). If your petition is granted because a violation of the Policy has occurred, no record of your registration in the course will appear on your transcript.

D. Petitions

A petition is a formal request that an exception to an academic regulation be made in your case. You must have good reason to make such a request, and you must show that you have acted responsibly and with good judgment in observing the academic regulations to the extent possible. Please note that some academic matters cannot be petitioned, although sometimes these may be resolved with an instructor or a Division offering a course.

Where a petition is justified, it must be filed by the appropriate deadline (See ßE Below). Even if a petition has been filed by the deadline, it will not be considered if documentation is not provided within three weeks of its submission.

1. To enter a petition you must obtain from the Registrar's Office a petition form. Follow the instructions on the form and fill it out completely, including the Petitioner's Checklist on page 4.

2. If you think the issue is simple and the solution straightforward, you may not need advice or assistance with your petition. However, if there are more complex academic issues involved you may want to speak first with your instructor, program supervisor or discipline representative. If serious personal problems are involved, you should try to meet with an academic advisor in Registrarial Services or a personal counsellor in the Health and Wellness Centre. Do not let this recommendation interfere with your submitting your petition by the deadline.

3. Submit whatever documentation is necessary to support your request.

(a) Medical certificates must show

(b) Statements from social workers, lawyers, clergy and other professionals must

4. Petitions for re-reading of final examinations and of term work returned to you after the end of term and after the instructor has submitted grades for the course will be granted only if you

5. You will be notified in writing of the decision on your petition. The petitions office attempts to respond as quickly as possible, normally within three weeks of submission. Please do not inquire about the progress of your petition within that period. Complex cases and petitions submitted during very busy periods may take longer.

6. If your petition is granted, the following will be recorded on your transcript (academic record):

In cases of error on the part of the University, including violations of the Grading Practices Policy, withdrawal from courses is not recorded on the transcript.

E. Deadlines

The deadlines below apply to the University of Toronto at Scarborough. Deadlines and policies for courses taken on other campuses may differ: see the appropriate Faculty Calendar.

1. Term Work

2. Final Examinations

Summer and Fall & Winter Sessions

Summer Session

Fall & Winter Sessions

3. Missed Deferred Examinations

4. Errors in Course Registration or Withdrawal From Courses

5. Checking of Marks and Appeal of Grades

F. Appeals

1. You may appeal denial of a petition to the Sub-committee on Academic Appeals. Such appeals must be commenced no later than six months after the decision being appealed has been communicated to you in writing. An appeal is commenced by filing a Notice of Appeal on the form provided for this purpose through the Office of the Associate Dean, room S-414A (telephone 287-7534). Full information may be obtained from that office.

2. You may appeal a decision of the Sub-committee on Academic Appeals to the Academic Appeals Committee of Governing Council. Such appeals must be commenced no later than ninety days after the decision being appealed has been communicated to you in writing. An appeal is commenced by filing a Notice of Appeal to the Secretary of the Appeals Committee on the form provided for this purpose. Full information may be obtained from the:
Secretary to the Appeals Committee
Office of the Governing Council
Room 106, Simcoe Hall
St. George Campus
(telephone [416] 978-8794)

Code of behaviour on academic matters

A. Preamble

The concern of the Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters is with the responsibilities of all parties to the integrity of the teaching and learning relationship. Honesty and fairness must inform this relationship, whose basis remains one of mutual respect for the aims of education and for those ethical principles which must characterize the pursuit and transmission of knowledge in the University.

What distinguishes the University from other centres of research is the central place which the relationship between teaching and learning holds. It is by virtue of this relationship that the University fulfills an essential part of its traditional mandate from society, and, indeed, from history: to be an expression of, and by so doing to encourage, a habit of mind which is discriminating at the same time it remains curious, which is at once equitable and audacious, valuing openness, honesty and courtesy before any private interests.

This mandate is more than a mere pious hope. It represents a condition necessary for free enquiry, which is the University's life blood. Its fulfillment depends upon the well being of that relationship whose parties define one another's roles as teacher and student, based upon differences in expertise, knowledge and experience, though bonded by respect, by a common passion for truth and by mutual responsibility to those principles and ideals that continue to characterize the University.


This Code is concerned, then, with the responsibilities of faculty members and students, not as they belong to administrative or professional or social groups, but as they co-operate in all phases of the teaching and learning relationship.

Such co-operation is threatened when teacher or student forsakes respect for the other - and for others involved in learning - in favour of self-interest, when truth becomes a hostage of expediency. On behalf of teacher and student and in fulfillment of its own principles and ideals, the University has a responsibility to ensure that academic achievement is not obscured or undermined by cheating or misrepresentation, that the evaluative process meets the highest standards of fairness and honesty, and that malevolent or even mischievous disruption is not allowed to threaten the educational process.

These are areas in which teacher and student necessarily share a common interest as well as common responsibilities.

B. Offences

The University and its members have a responsibility to ensure that a climate which might encourage, or conditions which might enable, cheating, misrepresentation or unfairness not be tolerated. To this end all must acknowledge that seeking credit or other advantages by fraud or misrepresentation, or seeking to disadvantage others by disruptive behaviour is unacceptable, as is any dishonesty or unfairness in dealing with the work or record of a student.

Wherever in this Code an offence is described as depending on "knowing", the offence shall likewise be deemed to have been committed if the person ought reasonably to have known.

B.I.

1. It shall be an offence for a student knowingly:

(a) to forge or in any other way alter or falsify any document or evidence required by the University, or to utter, circulate or make use of any such forged, altered or falsified document, whether the record be in print or electronic form;

(b) to use or possess an unauthorized aid or aids or obtain unauthorized assistance in any academic examination or term test or in connection with any other form of academic work;

(c) to personate another person, or to have another person personate, at any academic examination or term test or in connection with any other form of academic work;

(d) to represent as one's own any idea or expression of an idea or work of another in any academic examination or term test or in connection with any other form of academic work, i.e. to commit plagiarism;

"plagiarism". The present sense of plagiarism is contained in the original (1621) meaning in English: "the wrongful appropriation and purloining, and publication as one's own, of the ideas, or the expression of the ideas ... of another." This most common, and frequently most elusive of academic infractions is normally associated with student essays. Plagiarism can, however, also threaten the integrity of studio and seminar room, laboratory and lecture hall. Plagiarism is at once a perversion of originality and a denial of the interdependence and mutuality which are the heart of scholarship itself, and hence of the academic experience. Instructors should make clear what constitutes plagiarism within a particular discipline.

(e) to submit, without the knowledge and approval of the instructor to whom it is submitted, any academic work for which credit has previously been obtained or is being sought in another course or programme of study in the University or elsewhere;

(f) to submit any academic work containing a purported statement of fact or reference to a source which has been concocted.

2. It shall be an offence for a faculty member knowingly:

(a) to approve any of the previously described offences;

(b) to evaluate an application for admission or transfer to a course or program of study by reference to any criterion that is not academically justified;

(c) to evaluate academic work by a student by reference to any criterion that does not relate to its merit, to the time within which it is to be submitted or to the manner in which it is to be performed.

3. It shall be an offence for a faculty member and student alike knowingly:

(a) to forge or in any other way alter or falsify any academic record, or to utter, circulate or make use of any such forged, altered or falsified record, whether the record be in print or electronic form;

(b) to engage in any form of cheating, academic dishonesty or misconduct, fraud or misrepresentation not herein otherwise described, in order to obtain academic credit or other academic advantage of any kind.

4. A graduate of the University may be charged with any of the above offences committed knowingly while he or she was an active student, when, in the opinion of the Provost, the offence, if detected, would have resulted in a sanction sufficiently severe that the degree would not have been granted at the time that it was.

B. II. Parties to Offences

1. (a) Every member is a party to an offence under this Code who knowingly:

(i) actually commits it;

(ii) does or omits to do anything for the purpose of aiding or assisting another member to commit the offence;

(iii) does or omits to do anything for the purpose of aiding or assisting any other person who, if that person were a member, would have committed the offence;

(iv) abets, counsels, procures or conspires with another member to commit or be a party to an offence; or

(v) abets, counsels, procures or conspires with any other person who, if that person were a member, would have committed or have been a party to the offence.

(b) Every party to an offence under this Code is liable upon admission of the commission thereof, or upon conviction, as the case may be, to the sanctions applicable to that offence.

2. Every member who, having an intent to commit an offence under this Code, does or omits to do anything for the purpose of carrying out that intention (other than mere preparation to commit the offence) is guilty of an attempt to commit the offence and liable upon conviction to the same sanctions as if he or she had committed the offence.




3. When a group is found guilty of an offence under this Code, every officer, director or agent of the group, being a member of the University, who directed, authorized or participated in the commission of the offence is a party to and guilty of the offence and is liable upon conviction to the sanctions provided for the offence.

C. Procedures in cases involving students

At both the divisional level and the level of the University Tribunal, the procedures for handling charges of academic offences involving students reflect the gravity with which the University views such offences. At the same time, these procedures and those which ensure students the right of appeal represent the University's commitment to fairness and the cause of justice.

C.I.(a) Divisional Procedures

NOTE: Where a student commits an offence, the faculty in which the student is registered has responsibility over the student in the matter. In the case of Scarborough and Erindale Colleges, the college is deemed to be the faculty.

1. No hearing within the meaning of Section 2 of the Statutory Powers Procedure Act is required for the purposes of, or in connection with, any of the discussions, meetings and determinations referred to in Section C.I. (a), and such discussions, meetings and determinations are not proceedings of the Tribunal.

2. Where an instructor has reasonable grounds to believe that an academic offence has been committed by a student, the instructor shall so inform the student immediately after learning of the act or conduct complained of, giving reasons, and invite the student to discuss the matter. Nothing the student says in such a discussion may be used or receivable in evidence against the student.

3. If after such discussion, the instructor is satisfied that no academic offence has been committed, he or she shall so inform the student and no further action shall be taken in the matter by the instructor, unless fresh evidence comes to the attention of the instructor, in which case he or she may again proceed in accordance with subsection 2.

4. If after such discussion, the instructor believes that an academic offence has been committed by the student, or if the student fails or neglects to respond to the invitation for discussion, the instructor shall make a report of the matter to the department chair or through the department chair to the dean [Associate Dean. See also Section C.I. (b) 1.]

5. When the dean [Associate Dean] or the department chair, as the case may be, has been so informed, he or she shall notify the student in writing accordingly, provide him or her with a copy of the Code and subsequently afford the student an opportunity for discussion of the matter. In the case of the dean [Associate Dean] being informed, the chair of the department and the instructor shall be invited by the dean [Associate Dean] to be present at the meeting with the student. The dean [Associate Dean] shall conduct the interview.

6. Before proceeding with the meeting, the dean [Associate Dean] shall inform the student that he or she is entitled to seek advice, or to be accompanied by counsel at the meeting, before making, and is not obliged to make, any statement or admission, but shall warn that if he or she makes any statement or admission in the meeting, it may be used or receivable in evidence against the student in the hearing of any charge with respect to the alleged offence in question. The dean [Associate Dean] shall also advise the student, without further comment or discussion, of the sanctions that may be imposed under Section C.I. (b), and that the dean [Associate Dean] is not obliged to impose a sanction but may instead request that the Provost lay a charge against the student. Where such advice and warning have been given, the statements and admissions, if any, made in such a meeting may be used or received in evidence against the student in any such hearing.

7. If the dean [Associate Dean], on the advice of the department chair and the instructor, or if the department chair, on the advice of the instructor, subsequently decides that no academic offence has been committed and that no further action in the matter is required, the student shall be so informed in writing and the student's work shall be accepted for normal evaluation or, if the student was prevented from withdrawing from the course by the withdrawal date, he or she shall be allowed to do so. Thereafter, the matter shall not be introduced into evidence at a Tribunal hearing for another offence.

8. If the student admits the alleged offence, the dean [Associate Dean] or the department chair may either impose the sanctions that he or she considers appropriate under Section C.I. (b) or refer the matter to the dean [Associate Dean] or Provost, as the case may be, and in either event shall inform the student in writing accordingly. No further action in the matter shall be taken by the instructor, the department chair or the dean [Associate Dean] if the dean [Associate Dean] imposes a sanction.

9. If the student is dissatisfied with a sanction imposed by the department chair or the dean [Associate Dean], as the case may be, the student may refer the matter to the dean [Associate Dean] or Provost, as the case may be, for consideration.

10. If the student does not admit the alleged offence, the dean [Associate Dean] may, after consultation with the instructor and the department chair, request that the Provost lay a charge against the student. If the Provost agrees to lay a charge, the case shall then proceed to the Trial Division of the Tribunal.

11. Normally, decanal procedures will not be examined in a hearing before the Tribunal. A failure to carry out the procedures referred to in this Section, or any defect or irregularity in such procedures, shall not invalidate any subsequent proceedings of or before the Tribunal, unless the chair of the hearing considers that such failure, defect or irregularity resulted in a substantial wrong, detriment or prejudice to the accused. The chair will determine at the opening of the hearing whether there is to be any objection to an alleged defect, failure or irregularity.




12. No degree, diploma or certificate of the University shall be conferred or awarded, nor shall a student be allowed to withdraw from a course from the time of the alleged offence until the final disposition of the accusation. However, a student shall be permitted to use University facilities while a decision is pending, unless there are valid reasons for the dean [Associate Dean] to bar him or her from a facility. When or at any time after an accusation has been reported to the dean [Associate Dean], he or she may cause a notation to be recorded on the student's academic record and transcript, until the final disposition of the accusation, to indicate that the standing in a course and/or the student's academic status is under review. A student upon whom a sanction has been imposed by the dean [Associate Dean] or the department chair under Section C.I. (b) or who has been convicted by the Tribunal shall not be allowed to withdraw from a course so as to avoid the sanction imposed.

13. A record of cases disposed of under Section C.I. (a) and of the sanctions imposed shall be kept in the academic unit concerned and may be referred to by the dean [Associate Dean] in connection with a decision to prosecute, or by the prosecution in making representations as to the sanction or sanctions to be imposed by the Tribunal, for any subsequent offence committed by the student. Information on such cases shall be available to other academic units upon request and such cases shall be reported by the dean [Associate Dean] to the Secretary of the Tribunal for use in the Provost's annual report to the Academic Board. The dean [Associate Dean] may contact the Secretary of the Tribunal for advice or for information on cases disposed of under Section C.II. hereof.

14. Where a proctor or invigilator, who is not a faculty member, has reason to believe that an academic offence has been committed by a student at an examination or test, the proctor or invigilator shall so inform the student's dean [Associate Dean] or department chair, as the case may be, who shall proceed as if he or she were an instructor, by analogy to the other provisions of this section.

15. In the case of alleged offences not covered by the above procedures and not involving the submission of academic work, such as those concerning forgery or uttering, and in cases involving cancellation, recall or suspension of a degree, diploma or certificate, the procedure shall be regulated by analogy to the other procedures set out in this section.

C.I.(b) Divisional Sanctions

1. In an assignment worth 10 percent or less of the final grade, the department chair deal with the matter if:

(i) the student admits guilt; and

(ii) the assignment of a penalty is limited to at most a mark of zero for the piece of work.

If the student does not admit guilt, or if the department chair chooses, the matter shall be brought before the dean [Associate Dean].

2. One or more of the following sanctions may be imposed by the dean [Associate Dean] where a student admits to the commission of an alleged offence:

(a) an oral and/or written reprimand;

(b) an oral and/or written reprimand and, with the permission of the instructor, the re-submission of the piece of academic work, in respect of which the offence was committed, for evaluation. Such a sanction shall be imposed only for minor offences and where the student has committed no previous offence;

(c) assignment of a grade of zero or failure for the piece of academic work in respect of which the offence was committed;

(d) assignment of a penalty in the form of a reduction of the final grade in the course in respect of which the offence was committed;

(e) denial of privileges to use any facility of the University, including library and computer facilities;

(f) a monetary fine to cover the costs of replacing damaged property or misused supplies in respect of which the offence was committed;

(g) assignment of a grade of zero or a failure for the course in respect of which the offence was committed;

(h) suspension from attendance in a course or courses, a program, an academic division or unit, or the University for a period of not more than twelve months. Where a student has not completed a course or courses in respect of which an offence has not been committed, withdrawal from the course or courses without academic penalty shall be allowed.

3. The dean [Associate Dean] shall have the power to record any sanction imposed on the student's academic record and transcript for such length of time as he or she considers appropriate. However, the sanctions of suspension or a notation specifying academic misconduct as the reason for a grade of zero for a course shall normally be recorded for a period of five years.

4. The Provost shall, from time to time, indicate appropriate sanctions for certain offences. These guidelines shall be sent for information to the Academic Board and attached to the Code as Appendix "C".

C.II.(b) Tribunal Sanctions

1. One or more of the following sanctions may be imposed by the Tribunal upon the conviction of any student:

(a) an oral and/or written reprimand;

(b) an oral and/or written reprimand and, with the permission of the instructor, the re-submission of the piece of academic work, in respect of which the offence was committed, for evaluation. Such a sanction shall be imposed only for minor offences and where the student has committed no previous offence;

(c) assignment of a grade of zero or a failure for the piece of academic work in respect of which the offence was committed;

(d) assignment of a penalty in the form of a reduction of the final grade in the course in respect of which the offence was committed;

(e) denial of privileges to use any facility of the University, including library and computer facilities;

(f) a monetary fine to cover the costs of replacing damaged property or misused supplies in respect of which the offence was committed;

(g) assignment of a grade of zero or a failure for any completed or uncompleted course or courses in respect of which any offence was committed;

(h) suspension from attendance in a course or courses, a program, an academic unit or division, or the University for such a period of time up to five years as may be determined by the Tribunal. Where a student has not completed a course or courses in respect of which an offence has not been committed, withdrawal from the course or courses without academic penalty shall be allowed;

(i) recommendation of expulsion from the University. The Tribunal has power only to recommend that such a penalty be imposed. In any such case, the recommendation shall be made by the Tribunal to the President for a recommendation by him or her to the Governing Council. Expulsion shall mean that the student shall be denied any further registration at the University in any program, and his or her academic record and transcript shall record this sanction permanently. Where a student has not completed a course or courses in respect of which an offence has not been committed, withdrawal from the course or courses without academic penalty shall be allowed. If a recommendation for expulsion is not adopted, the Governing Council shall have the power to impose such lesser penalty as it sees fit.

(j) (i) recommendation to the Governing Council for cancellation, recall or suspension of one or more degrees, diplomas or certificates obtained by any graduate; or

(ii) cancellation of academic standing or academic credits obtained by any former student who, while enrolled, committed

any offence which if detected before the granting of the degree, diploma, certificate, standing or credits would, in the judgment of the Tribunal, have resulted in a conviction and the application of a sanction sufficiently severe that the degree, diploma, certificate, standing, credits or marks would not have been granted.

2. The hearing panel shall have the power to order that any sanction imposed by the Tribunal be recorded on the student's academic record and transcript for such length of time as the panel considers appropriate.

3. The Tribunal may, if it considers it appropriate, report any case to the Provost who may publish a notice of the decision of the Tribunal and the sanction or sanctions imposed in the University newspapers, with the name of the student withheld.

NOTE: The University of Toronto at Scarborough has a policy on the use of calculators in tests and examinations. Students should consult with instructors about whether the use of calculators is permissible in their course and if so which models are approved. The use of an unauthorized calculator may be treated as an academic offence.

Code of Student Conduct

A. Preface

1. The University of Toronto is a large community of teaching staff, administrative staff and students, involved in teaching, research, learning and other activities. Student members of the University are adherents to a division of the University for the period of their registration in the academic program to which they have been admitted and as such assume the responsibilities that such registration entails.

2. As an academic community, the University governs the activities of its members by standards such as those contained in the Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters, which provides definitions of offences that may be committed by student members and which are deemed to affect the academic integrity of the University's activities.

3. The University sponsors, encourages or tolerates many non-academic activities of its members, both on its campuses and away from them. These activities, although generally separate from the defined requirements of students' academic programs, are a valuable and important part of the life of the University and of its students.

4. The University does not stand in loco parentis to its student members, that is, it has no general responsibility for the moral and social behaviour of its students, as if they were its wards. In the exercise of its disciplinary authority and responsibility, the University treats students as free to organize their own personal lives, behaviour and associations subject only to the law and to University regulations that are necessary to protect the integrity and safety of University activities, the peaceful and safe enjoyment of University housing by residents and neighbours, or the freedom of members of the University to participate reasonably in the programs of the University and in activities in or on the University's premises. Strict regulation of such activities by the University of Toronto is otherwise neither necessary nor appropriate.

5. University members are not, as such, immune from the criminal and civil laws of the wider political units to which they belong. Provisions for non-academic discipline should not attempt to shelter students from their civic responsibilities nor add unnecessarily to these responsibilities. Conduct that constitutes a breach of the Criminal Code or other statute, or that would give rise to a civil claim or action, should ordinarily be dealt with by the appropriate criminal or civil court. In cases, however, in which criminal or civil proceedings have not been taken or would not adequately protect the University's interests and responsibilities as defined below, proceedings may be brought under a discipline code of the University, but only in cases where such internal proceedings are appropriate in the circumstances.

6. The University must define standards of student behaviour and make provisions for student discipline with respect to conduct that jeopardizes the good order and proper functioning of the academic and non-academic programs and activities of the University or its divisions, that endangers the health, safety, rights or property of its members or visitors, or that adversely affects the property of the University or bodies related to it, where such conduct is not, for the University's defined purposes, adequately regulated by civil and criminal law.

7. Nothing in this Code shall be construed to prohibit peaceful assemblies and demonstrations, lawful picketing, or to inhibit freedom of speech as defined in the University.

8. In this Code, the word "premises" includes lands, buildings and grounds.

9. In this Code, "student" means a member of the University

i) engaged in any academic work which leads to the recording and/or issue of a mark, grade or statement of performance by the appropriate authority in the University or another institution; and/or

ii) registered in any academic course which entitles the member to the use of a University library, library materials, library resources, computer facility or data set;

and/or

iii) who is a post-doctoral fellow.

10. In the following, the words "University of Toronto" refer to the University of Toronto and include any institutions federated or affiliated with it, where such inclusion has been agreed upon by the University and the federated or affiliated institution, with respect to the premises, facilities, equipment, services, activities, students and other members of the federated or affiliated institution.

Note: The University of Toronto has agreed that, when the premises, facilities, equipment, services or activities of the University of Toronto are referred to in this Code, the premises, facilities, equipment, services and activities of the University of St. Michael's College, Trinity College and Victoria University are included.

11. In this Code, where an offence is described as depending on "knowing", the offence shall likewise be deemed to have been committed if the person ought reasonably to have known.

12. This Code is concerned with conduct that the University considers unacceptable. In the case of student members of the University, the procedures and sanctions described herein shall apply. In the case of other members of the University, such conduct is to be dealt with in accordance with the established policy, procedures and agreements that apply to the members.

B. Offences

The following offences constitute conduct that shall be deemed to be offences under this Code, when committed by a student of the University of Toronto, provided that such conduct

i) has not been dealt with as failure to meet standards of professional conduct as required by a college, faculty or school; and

ii) is not specifically assigned to the jurisdiction of the University Tribunal, as in the case of offences described in the Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters, or to another disciplinary body within the University of Toronto, as in the case of sexual harassment as described in the Policy and Procedures: Sexual Harassment; and

iii) except as otherwise provided herein, occurs on premises of the University of Toronto or elsewhere in the course of activities sponsored by the University of Toronto or by any of its divisions.

1. Offences against persons

a) No person shall assault another person sexually or threaten any other person with sexual assault.

b) No person shall otherwise assault another person, threaten any other person with bodily harm, or knowingly cause any other person to fear bodily harm.

c) No person shall knowingly create a condition that unnecessarily endangers the health or safety of other persons.

d) No person shall threaten any other person with damage to such person's property, or knowingly cause any other person to fear damage to her or his property.

e) No person shall engage in a course of vexatious conduct

- that is directed at one or more specific individuals, and

- that is based on the race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, creed, age, marital status, family status, handicap, receipt of public assistance or record of offences of that individual or those individuals, and

- that is known to be unwelcome, and

- that exceeds the bounds of freedom of expression or academic freedom as these are understood in University policies and accepted practices, including but not restricted to, those explicitly adopted.

NOTE: Terms in this section are to be understood as they are defined or used in the Ontario Human Rights Code.

f) (i) No person shall, by engaging in the conduct described in subsection (ii) below,

- whether on the premises of the University or away from the premises of the University,

- cause another person or persons to fear for their safety or the safety of another person known to them while on the premises of the University of Toronto or in the course of activities sponsored by the University of Toronto or by any of its divisions, or cause another person or persons to be impeded in exercising the freedom to participate reasonably in the programs of the University and in activities in or on the University's premises,

- knowing that their conduct will cause such fear, or recklessly as to whether their conduct causes such fear.

ii) The conduct mentioned in subsection (i) consists of

(a) repeatedly following from place to place the other person or anyone known to them;

(b) repeatedly and persistently communicating with, either directly or indirectly, the other person or anyone known to them.

(c) besetting or repeatedly watching the dwelling-house, or place where the other person, or anyone known to them, resides, works, carries on business or happens to be; or

(d) engaging in threatening conduct directed at the other person or any member of the family, friends or colleagues of the other person.

2. Disruption

No person shall cause by action, threat or otherwise, a disturbance that the member knows obstructs any activity organized by the University of Toronto or by any of its divisions, or the right of another member or members to carry on their legitimate activities, to speak or to associate with others.

For example, peaceful picketing or other activity outside a class or meeting that does not substantially interfere with the communication inside, or impede access to the meeting, is an acceptable expression of dissent. And silent or symbolic protest is not to be considered disruption under this Code. But noise that obstructs the conduct of a meeting or forcible blocking of access to an activity constitutes disruption.

3. Offences involving property

a) No person shall knowingly take, destroy or damage premises of the University of Toronto.

b) No person shall knowingly take, destroy or damage any physical property that is not her or his own.

c) No person shall knowingly destroy or damage information or intellectual property belonging to the University of Toronto or to any of its members.

d) No person, in any manner whatsoever, shall knowingly deface the inside or outside of any building of the University of Toronto.

e) No person, knowing the effects or property to have been appropriated without authorization, shall possess effects or property of the University of Toronto.

f) No person, knowing the effects or property to have been appropriated without authorization, shall possess any property that is not her or his own.

g) No person shall knowingly create a condition that unnecessarily endangers or threatens destruction of the property of the University of Toronto or of any of its members.

4. Unauthorized entry or presence

No person shall, contrary to the expressed instruction of a person or persons authorized to give such instruction, or with intent to damage or destroy the premises of the University of Toronto or damage, destroy or steal any property on the premises of the University of Toronto that is not her or his own, or without just cause knowingly enter or remain in or on any such premises.

5. Unauthorized use of University facilities, equipment or services

a) No person shall knowingly use any facility, equipment or service of the University of Toronto contrary to the expressed instruction of a person or persons authorized to give such instruction, or without just cause.

b) No person shall knowingly gain access to or use any University computing or internal or external communications facility to which legitimate authorization has not been granted. No person shall use any such facility for any commercial, disruptive or unauthorized purpose.

Appropriate uses for University connections to external networks are described, for example, in the policy document "Appropriate Use Policy for the ONet Network".

c) No person shall knowingly mutilate, misplace, misfile, or render inoperable any stored information such as books, film, data files or programs from a library, computer or other information storage, processing or retrieval system.



6. False charges

No person shall knowingly or maliciously bring a false charge against any member of the University of Toronto under this Code.

7. Aiding in the commission of an offence

No person shall counsel, procure, conspire with or aid a person in the commission of an offence defined in this Code.

8. Refusal to comply with sanctions

No person found to have committed an offence under this Code shall refuse to comply with a sanction or sanctions imposed under the procedures of this Code.

9. Unauthorized possession or use of firearms or ammunition

No person other than a peace officer or a member of the Canadian Forces acting in the course of duty shall possess or use any firearm or ammunition on the premises of the University of Toronto without the permission of the officer of the University having authority to grant such permission.

NOTE: The President of the University or another senior officer designated by the President has been given the authority to grant such permission for the premises of the University of Toronto under the authority of the Governing Council of the University. The President has designated the Vice-President - Administration and Human Resources to exercise this authority. Various officers of institutions federated with the University of Toronto have authority to grant such permission with respect to the premises of the federated institutions.

C. Hearing Procedures

1. Whenever possible and appropriate, informal resolution and mediation shall be used to resolve issues of individual behaviour before resort is made to formal disciplinary procedures.

2. An Investigating Officer, who may be a student, shall be appointed for a term of up to three years by the principal, dean or director (hereinafter called "head") of each faculty, college or school in which students are registered (hereinafter called "division"), after consultation with the elected student leader or leaders of the division, to investigate complaints made against student members of that division. Investigating Officers shall hold office until their successors are appointed.

3. A Hearing Officer, who may be a student, shall be appointed for a term off up to three years by the council of each division to decide on complaints under this Code made against student members of that division. Hearing Officers shall hold office until their successors are appointed.

4. If the Investigating Officer is, for any reason, unable to conduct an investigation, then the head of the division shall appoint another person as Investigating Officer for the particular case. If the Hearing Officer is, for any reason, unable to chair the hearing of any case, then the senior chair of the University Tribunal shall appoint another person as Hearing Officer for the particular case.

5. Where the head of the division has reason to believe that a non-academic offence as defined in this Code may have been committed by a student member or members of the division, the Investigating Officer will conduct an investigation into the case. After having completed the investigation, the Investigating Officer shall report on the investigation to the head of the division. If the head of the division concludes, on the basis of this report, that the student or students may have committed an offence under the Code of Student Conduct, the head of the division shall have the discretion to request that a hearing take place to determine whether the student or students have committed the offence alleged.

6. The hearing will be chaired by the Hearing Officer. The case will be presented by the Investigating Officer, who may be assisted and represented by legal counsel. If the right to a hearing is waived, or after a hearing, the Hearing Officer will rule on whether the student or students have committed the offence alleged and may impose one or more sanctions as listed below. The accused student or students may be assisted and represented by another person, who may be legal counsel.

7. Appeals against decisions of bodies acting under authority from the council of a division to hear cases arising out of residence codes of behaviour may be made to the Hearing Officer of the division, where provision therefore has been made by the council of the division.

8. Appeals against the decision of the Hearing Officer may be made to the Discipline Appeals Board of the Governing Council.

9. Where the head of a division has reason to believe that a non-academic offence may have been committed by a group of students including students from that division and from another division or divisions, the head may consult with the head of the other division or divisions involved and may then agree that some or all of the cases will be investigated jointly by the Investigating Officers of the divisions of the students involved and that some or all of the cases will be heard together by the Hearing Officer of one of the divisions agreed upon by the heads and presented by one of the Investigating Officers agreed upon by the heads.

D. Sanctions

The following sanctions or combinations of them may be imposed upon students found to have committed an offence under this Code.

In addition, students found to have committed an offence may be placed on conduct probation for a period not to exceed one year, with the provision that one or more of the following sanctions will be applied if the conduct probation is violated.

1. Formal written reprimand

2. Order for restitution, rectification or the payment of damages

3. A fine or bond for good behaviour not to exceed $100

4. Requirement of public service work not to exceed 25 hours

5. Denial of access to specified services, activities or facilities of the University for a period of up to one year

The following two sanctions, which would directly affect a student's registration in a program, may be imposed only where it has been determined that the offence committed is of such a serious nature that the student's continued registration threatens the academic function of the University of Toronto or of any of its divisions or the ability of other students to continue their programs of study.

6. Suspension from registration in any course or program of a division or divisions for a period of up to one year

7. Recommendation for expulsion from the University

Other Codes

Some parts of the University, such as the Library and the Computer Centre, have developed codes of their own to make clear in what respects precisely the Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters and the Code of Student Conduct apply in their areas. Students should be aware of the existence of these codes. They are equally bound by them.


Back to Academic Regulations (Part II) | On to Telephone directory: frequently called numbers | Up to Index | Search the Calendar