Back to Chemistry | On to Environmental Science | Up to Index | Search the Calendar

Computer Science

(B.Sc.)


C. Dyer, B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D., Professor
W.H. Enright, B.Sc. (U.B.C.), M.Sc., Ph.D., Professor
V. Hadzilacos, B.A. (Princeton), Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor
G. Hirst, B.A., B.Sc., (Monash), M.Sc., (A.N.U., U.B.C.) Ph.D. (Brown), Professor
A. Mendelzon, B.S., M.S.E., M.A., Ph.D., (Princeton), Professor
N. Cheng, B.Sc., Senior Tutor
G.J. Cupit, B.Sc. (U.B.C.), Senior Tutor

Discipline Representative: Graeme Hirst (287-7257)
Computer science is the study of the use of computers to process information. The form of this information may vary widely, from the business person's records or the scientist's experimental results to the linguist's texts. One of the fundamental concepts in computer science is the algorithm -- a list of instructions that specify the steps required to solve a problem. Computer science is concerned with producing correct, efficient, and maintainable algorithms for a wide variety of applications. Closely related is the development of tools to foster these goals: programming languages for expressing algorithms; operating systems to manage the resources of a computer; and various mathematical and statistical techniques to study the correctness and efficiency of algorithms.
Theoretical computer science is also concerned with the inherent difficulty of problems that can make them intractable by computers. Numerical analysis, data management systems, computer graphics, and artificial intelligence are concerned with the applications of computers to specific problem areas.
The Specialist Programme in Computer Science prepares a student for graduate study and for a professional position in the computer field.
Students interested in computer studies should also refer to Specialist and Major Programmes in Cognitive Science.

Please refer to the Physical Sciences Scarborough preamble on page 116 for a list of the Programmes offered. Descriptions of these programmes will be found on subsequent pages of this section.


SPECIALIST PROGRAMME IN COMPUTER SCIENCE


Supervisor: G. Cupit (287-7253)

This programme provides a broadly based education in computer science. It prepares a student for a professional position in the computer field, and for graduate study in computer science.

First Year:


CSCA58F/S Introduction to Computer Science
MATA04Y Linear Algebra
MATA26Y Calculus
[PHYA20F Principles of Classical Physics
PHYA21S Principles of Modern Physics]
or
[PHYA10F Dynamics of Classical Systems
PHYA21S Principles of Modern Physics]
or
PHYA31S Physics of Electromagnetic Devices

First or Second Year:

CSCB70S Fundamental Data Structures and Techniques

Second Year:


CSCB28F File Structures and Data Management
CSCB38F Discrete Mathematics
CSCB58S Computer Organization
MATB41F Techniques of the Calculus of Several Variables I
MATB42S Techniques of the Calculus of Several Variables II
Two of:
MATB31F, MATB43S, MATB70S, MATC51F, MATC60F, PSCB20F. Students intending to proceed to graduate study in computer science are advised to take MATB43

Third Year:


CSCC24S Principles of Programming Languages
CSCC64S Effective and Efficient Computing
CSCC78F Data Structure and Algorithm Analysis
STAB22F Statistics
STAB47S Introduction to Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics

Fourth Year:


CSCB09S Methods and Tools for Software Development
CSCC50F Numerical Algebra and Optimization
CSCC51S Numerical Approximation, Integration and Ordinary Differential Equations
CSCC85S Microprocessors

one of:

CSCC54F, 340, 372, 408, D18/418, 428, D34/434, 454, 458, 468, 484, 485, 488, ECE489

one of:

CSC438, 446, 448, 456, 465, 478, MATC31F, C32F

PSCD01F The Physical Sciences in Contemporary Society

PSCD03S Computers in Contemporary Society


SPECIALIST PROGRAMME IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS


Supervisor: G. Hirst (287-7257)

NOTE: Due to enrolment restrictions in required Management courses, registration in this programme is limited. A maximum of ten students will be admitted annually to the second year of the programme. Selection will be based on grades specified for the first year of the programme with a minimum


GPA of 2.5. There are 14 courses required for the programme. The courses may be taken in an order different from that listed below, but care must be taken to ensure that prerequisites are satisfied and conflicts avoided.

First Year:


CSCA58F/S Introduction to Computer Science
MATA04Y Linear Algebra
MATA26Y Calculus
MGTA02Y Introduction to Management

First or Second Year:

CSCB70S Computer Applications

Second Year:


CSCB28F File Structures and Data Management
CSCB38F Discrete Math for Computer Science
CSCB58S Computer Organization
MATB41F Calculus of Several Variables I
MATB42S Calculus of Several Variables II
MGTB23F Managing People in Organizations
STAB22F/S Statistics

Third Year:


CSCC24S Principles of Programming Languages
CSCC78F Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
CSC340S Information Systems Analysis and Design
either
CSCC50F Numerical Algebra and Optimization
or
CSCC54F/S Systems Modelling and Discrete Simulation
(CSC354S Systems Modelling and Discrete Simulation)
MGTB29F* Managing Groups and Organizations
STAB47S Introduction to Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics
* The prerequisite of MGTB24 is waived for students in this Programme.

Third or Fourth Year:


either
CSC300F Computers and Society
or
PSCD03S Computers in Contemporary Society
CSCB09S Software Tools
CSCD34S Data Management Systems
(CSC434F/S Data Management Systems)
CSC408F Software Engineering

one or more of:
MGTC75S Operations Management: A Mathematical Approach**
or
MGTC74S Analysis for Decision Making**
or
CSC454F The Business of Software***

Two of: CSC372, C85, 458, 465, 468, 484, 485, 488

** Students in this programme may substitute MATB41, CSCC50 or CSCC54 or CSC354 and STAB47 for the stated prerequisites.

*** This course is offered only in alternate years, and enrollment is restricted.

Note that 300-series and 400-series courses must be balloted for and completed at the St. George Campus. Consult the Department of Computer Science Undergraduate Student Handbook.


SPECIALIST PROGRAMME IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS


Supervisor: G. Cupit (287-7253)

This programme provides a broadly based education in computer science and mathematics. It prepares a student for a professional position in the computer field and it is appropriate for students who may wish to pursue a career in teaching or in government and industry. It can also lead to graduate study.

First Year:


CSCA58F/S Introduction to Computer Science
MATA04Y Linear Algebra
MATA26Y Calculus
[PHYA20F Principles of Classical Physics
PHYA21S] Principles of Modern Physics
or
[PHYA10F Dynamics of Classical Systems


PHYA21S Principles of Modern Physics]

or

PHYA31S Physics of Electromagnetic Devices

First or Second Year:

CSCB70S Fundamental Data Structures and Techniques

Second Year:


CSCB38F Discrete Mathematics
CSCB58S Computer Organization
MATB30F Geometry I
MATB31F Algebra I
MATB32S Algebra II
MATB41F Techniques of the Calculus of Several Variables I
MATB42S Techniques of the Calculus of Several Variables II
MATB43S Introduction to Analysis

Third Year:


CSCC24S Principles of Programming Languages
CSCC64S Effective and Efficient Computing
CSCC78F Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
MATC49F Galois Theory
MATC51F Differential Equations I
MATC56S Differential Equations II
STAB22F Statistics
STAB47S Introduction to Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics

Fourth Year:


one of:
(MATC53Y), MATC60F, MATC01S, MATC57S
and two of:
MATC65S, CSCC50F, CSCC51S

One other 0.5 F.C.E. in Computer Science

one of:

MATB70S, C30S, C31F, C32F

PSCD01F The Physical Sciences in Contemporary Society
PSCD02S Current Questions in Mathematics and Science
or
PSCD03S Computers in Contemporary Society





SPECIALIST PROGRAMME IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND PHYSICS


Supervisor: C. C. Dyer (287-7206)

This programme is also available as an option in the Co-op Computer Science and Physical Sciences Programme. See listing for Physical Sciences Co-op programmes.

First Year:


CSCA58F/S Introduction to Computer Science
MATA04Y Linear Algebra
MATA26Y Calculus
[PHYA20F Principles of Classical Physics
PHYA21S Principles of Modern Physics]
or
[PHYA10F Dynamics of Classical Systems
PHYA21S Principles of Modern Physics]

First or Second Year:

CSCB70S Fundamental Data Structures and Techniques

Second Year:


CSCB28F File Structure and Data Management
CSCB38F Discrete Mathematics
CSCB58S Computer Organization
MATB41F Techniques of the Calculus of Several Variables I
MATB42S Techniques of the Calculus of Several Variables II
PHYB20F Classical and Quantum Waves
PHYB21S Electricity and Magnetism
PHYB22S Electronics
PHYB23H Physics Laboratory

Third Year:


CSCB09S Methods and Tools for Software Development
CSCC24S Principles of Programming Languages
CSCC50F Numerical Algebra and Optimization
CSCC78F Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis
CSCC85F Microprocessors
MATC51F Differential Equations I
PHLB70F Philosophy of Science
PSCC01S Physical Principles of Modern Technology



Fourth Year:


CSCC51S Numerical Approximation, Integration and Ordinary Differential Equations
CSCC64S Effective and Efficient Computing
PHYC22S Structure of Matter
One additional F.C.E. from other C-level and D-level courses in AST, CHM, CSC, EES, MAT, PHY, or STA
PSCD01F The Physical Sciences in Contemporary Society
PSCD02S Current Questions in Mathematics & Science
or
PSCD03S Computers in Contemporary Science

SPECIALIST PROGRAMME IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND STATISTICS


Supervisor: Sudha Jain (287-7274)

The Specialist Programme in Computer Science and Statistics provides a student with the computational and statistical background required in many applications of these fields. The programme prepares students for employment opportunities in business, government and education and for further graduate study. This programme is also an option available in the Co-op Computer Science and Physical Sciences Programme. See listing under Co-op.

First year:


CSCA58F/S Introduction to Computer Science
MATA04Y Linear Algebra
MATA26Y Calculus
[PHYA20F Principles of Classical Physics
PHYA21S Principles of Modern Physics]
or
[PHYA10F Dynamics of Classical Systems
PHYA21S Principles of Modern Physics]
or
PHYA31S Physics of Electromagnetic Devices

First or Second Year:

CSCB70S Fundamental Data Structures and Techniques

Second Year:

CSCB28F File Structures and Data Management


CSCB38F Discrete Mathematics
CSCB58S Computer Organization
MATB41F Techniques of the Calculus of Several Variables I
MATB42S Techniques of the Calculus of Several Variables II
STAB22F Statistics
STAB47S Introduction to Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics

Second or Third Year:

One of:

MATB31F, MATB43S, MATB70S, MATC51F, MATC60F, PSCB20F. Students intending to proceed to graduate study in computer science are advised to take MATB43.

Third Year:

CSCC24S Principles of Programming Languages

CSCC64S Effective and Efficient Computing

CSCC78F Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis

1 half F.C.E. from other C-level statistics courses at Scarborough, CSCC54F, and 300-and 400-level statistics courses on the St. George campus.

Third or Fourth Year:


STAC42S Multivariate Analysis
STAC52S Experimental Design
STAC57S Time Series Analysis
STAC62F Stochastic Processes
STAC67F Regression Analysis
(NOTE: Not all C-level statistics courses are offered every year)

Fourth Year:


CSCC50F Numerical Algebra and Optimization
CSCC51S Numerical Approximation, Integration and Ordinary Differential Equations
PSCD01F The Physical Sciences in Contemporary Society
PSCD03S Computers in Contemporary Society

1 half F.C.E. from C-level statistics courses at Scarborough, CSCC54F, and 300- and 400-level statistics courses on the St. George campus.





SPECIALIST (CO-OPERATIVE) PROGRAMME IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES



Co-ordinator: G. Cupit (287-7253)
Supervisor of Studies: C. Dyer (287-7206)
The Co-operative Programme in Computer Science and Physical Sciences is a work-study programme which combines academic studies in computer science, and other disciplines in the physical sciences with work placements in public and private enterprises. Two work terms must be completed along with the academic programme. An optional third work term may be included, with permission of the Co-ordinator.
The programme prepares students for permanent employment with government and business enterprises concerned with research and technology as well as for graduate study in computer science. Graduates receive a four-year B.Sc. with a specialist certification in Computer Science and Physical Sciences.

Admission to the Programme

a. Applicants from Grade 13 OAC programmes (or equivalent) should indicate their choice of University of Toronto at Scarborough and the Co-operative Programme in Computer Science and Physical Sciences on their Application for Admission to an Ontario University. They will then be sent a special application form for admission to a co-operative programme.

b. From first-year university: Students accepted by the University and College may apply. The timing of their work placement will depend upon the particular university courses they have already completed.

Admissions are granted on the basis of the applicant's academic performance, background in relevant subjects, and a letter of reference from a high school teacher or university instructor. An interview may be required. Enrolment is limited and only a small number of applicants can be accepted each year. Decisions about admissions are normally made annually in May and early June. To be considered for the first round of selection, co-op applications must be received by the University no later than April 15. Therefore it is essential that the applicant apply to the University at least six weeks before this date.

Fees:

Every student in a co-operative programme is required to pay additional fees as established by the University.

This programme requires twenty F.C.E.'s (four years) of study and two work terms of four months each. Exceptionally, with the agreement of the co-ordinator, a third work term may be allowed. Students are eligible for their first work term after their first two years of study. Work placement opportunities are arranged by the Physical Sciences Division, but must be won by students in competition with all applicants for the position.
Performance on work terms will be evaluated by both employer and co-ordinator. Students must also submit a report for each work term for evaluation.
To maintain standing in the programme, to be eligible for a work term, and to receive specialist certification upon graduation a student must
- maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5
- receive a satisfactory evaluation for work term performance and work term reports
- be registered as a full-time student during study terms
There are two courses of study offered within this co-operative programme:
Option A: Computer Science and Physics;
Option B: Computer Science and Statistics.

For programme outlines, please refer to the Physical Sciences Scarborough Specialist Programme Computer Science and Physics, page 131, and Specialist Programme Computer Science and Statistics, page 132. Note that courses need not be taken in exactly the indicated order, but if an alternative ordering is adopted, care must be taken to ensure that prerequisites are satisfied and conflicts avoided.

EACH STUDENT'S PROGRAMME REQUIRES THE ANNUAL APPROVAL OF THE SUPERVISOR OF STUDIES.

NOTE: STUDENTS ARE INDIVIDUALLY RESPONSIBLE TO ENSURE THAT THEY HAVE CORRECTLY COMPLETED PROGRAMME AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION.


Eligibility for work placements

To compete for a work term placement a student must be in good standing in the programme and must have completed at least ten F.C.E.'s.

Normally, students return to their studies after each work term (and must be registered in courses after the completion of their last work term).

CSPC01,CSPC03-H Computer Science and Physical Sciences Co-op Work Term

Work terms are an integral part of the co-op curriculum. Practical work experience in an appropriate, related field is alternated with study terms to enhance academic studies and develop professional and personal skills. Work term reports are required at the completion of each work term. Continuation in a co-op programme is based on a student's ability to meet both the academic and work term requirements. To be eligible for work terms, students must be in good standing in the programme and must have completed 10 courses. Course credit of 0.5 F.C.E. is granted for each four month work period. Work term credits are in addition to the 20 full-course degree requirements and are graded on a Credit, No Credit system. There are no additional course fees for work terms.

CSCA02F/S/H How Computers Are Used


Telephone ID # CSCA02F: 03710233
Telephone ID # CSCA02S: 03710253
An introduction to computers and how to use them.
This course includes a study of system operations (commands, files, security), common applications (games, word processing, spreadsheets) and problem solving (basic programming concepts). Other applications and topics include: data organization, communications, office automation, electronic mail, and Internet tools. Students will do a little programming, but the aim of the course is to show how computers are used, not to teach programming. Primarily for non-science students, but may be followed by other CSC courses.
Exclusion: SMC104H; VIC104H. This course may not be taken after or concurrently with any other CSC course.
Session (F/S): Winter Day, Winter Evening
Session (F): Summer Evening

CSCA06F Introduction to Computer Programming


Telephone ID # : 03710633
An introduction to basic concepts and terminology.
Introduction to programming using the Object Oriented Turing language: Conditional statements and loops; arrays and records; operations on strings and numbers; subprograms. Data and program structuring.
This course is intended for students with no prior exposure to computer programming. Students who have sufficient programming experience may enroll directly in CSCA58; consult the instructor or the supervisor of studies for guidance and for a copy of the information sheet "Can I skip Computer Science A06?"
Exclusion: CSCA56F/S, CSCA57F/S, CSCA58F/S, CSC108, CSC148.
Prerequisite: Grade 12 mathematics
Session: Winter Day

CSCA57S Introduction to Scientific Computing


Telephone ID #: 03715753
An introduction to the use of computers in the physical and biological sciences. Choice and design of algorithms and their implementation in a high-level computer language, such as C or FORTRAN, for the solution of problems arising in the physical and biological sciences. Topics will include elementary numerical analysis, such as numerical integration, mathematical modeling of physical systems, data fitting and interpolation. The use of database systems for information storage and query and the use of graphical display devices and software for visualization of physical systems will be considered. The use of computer algebra systems will also be considered. (Intended primarily for physical and biological science students who do not plan to pursue any of the programmes in computer science or cognitive science.)
Exclusions: CSCA06, A56, A58, 108, 148
Co-requisite: MATA26Y & one A-level science course
Session: Winter Day

CSCA58F/S Introduction to Computer Science


Telephone ID # CSCA58F: 03715833
Telephone ID # CSCA58S: 03715853
Design and analysis of algorithms; reasoning about programs, their correctness and efficiency. Procedural abstraction and modular design: subprograms, recursion and modules. Data abstraction: Data types and data structures. Comparison of several searching and sorting algorithms.
Students who have insufficient programming experience must take CSCA06 before CSCA58. Consult the instructor or supervisor of studies for guidance and for a copy of the information sheet "Can I Skip Computer Science A06?" Students who enroll in CSCA58 and find the course too difficult may "drop down" to CSCA06. The deadline for "dropping down" is October 15. (The option of "dropping down" is not available in the spring, since CSCA06 is not offered in that session.)
Exclusion: CSCA57, CSC148, CSC150
Prerequisite: OAC in Algebra and Geometry & one other OAC in mathematics & sufficient programming experience.
Session: Winter Day

CSCB09S Methods and Tools for Software Development


Telephone ID #: 03720953
Techniques for programming efficiently by making use of operating-system facilities and standard utilities and software tools. Tools discussed and used are from the UNIX environment using the C programming language. Topics from: Programmable command interpreters ("shells"), Program generators, networking, interprocess communication, windows programming, challenging assignments emphasize the importance of good design, programming aptitude and use of appropriate tools.
Prerequisite: CSCA58F/S
Corequisite: CSCB70F/S or proficiency in C
Session: Winter Day

CSCB28F File Structures and Data Management


Telephone ID #: 03722833
An introduction to techniques for storing, accessing, and managing long-term data in computer systems. Hardware and software aspects of data processing: processors, storage devices, communications, file I/O control. Techniques for organizing and managing files: serial files, direct files, indexed files, multikey files, integrated files, file systems. Introduction to data base management systems with emphasis on relational data base systems.
Exclusion: CSC228
Prerequisite: CSCA58F/S
Session: Winter Day

CSCB38F Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science


Telephone ID #: 03723833
A rigorous treatment of certain aspects of discrete mathematics with applications to computer science. Emphasis on the basic properties and fundamental algorithms concerning integers (including induction, Euclidean algorithm, modular arithmetic), and on logic (including propositional and predicate calculus and simple formal theories). Application to topics such as program correctness, formal program verification, algorithms from graph theory, and elementary set theory.
Exclusion: CSC238
Prerequisite: CSCA58F/S
Co-requisite: MATA04Y (MATA40)
Session: Winter Day

CSCB58S Computer Organization


Telephone ID #: 03725853
This course is designed to give students an understanding of the operation and the hardware of a modern digital computer. Specific topics include: an introduction to Boolean algebra, the design and analysis of gate networks, memory devices, the organization of a simple microprogrammed machine, basic data representation, assembly language, addressing structures, mechanisms for input and output, the structure of peripheral devices, some case studies of particular machines. There will be four laboratory periods in which students will conduct experiments with digital logic circuits.
Enrolment limit: 100
Exclusion: CSC258
Prerequisite: CSCA58F/S or CSCA57F/S [strongly recommended: PHYA31S (PHYA11S)]
Session: Winter Day

CSCB70S Fundamental Data Structures and Techniques


Telephone ID #: 03727053
Standard programming methods, with an introduction to C and C++. Use of classes to represent abstract data types, graph representation and graph algorithms. Simulation: Data structures and program organization for event-driven models. Representation of floating-point numbers; Introduction to numerical methods, optimization using dynamic programming. Throughout the course, programming assignments stress both the proper use of abstract data types (lists, stacks, trees, heaps) and approaches to writing larger, more complex programs.
Prerequisite: CSCA58F/S
Pre or co-requisite: MATA26Y & one A-level science course.
Session: Winter Day

CSCC24S Principles of Programming Languages


Telephone ID #: 03732453
A wide variety of programming styles and the programming languages that support them. Emphasis on recursion and concurrency; other programming regimes such as backtracking and coroutines. language features such as pattern matching, programs as data, and module encapsulation. Examples from languages such as Lisp, Concurrent Euclid, Prolog, Small talk, and Simula.
Enrolment limit: 100
Exclusion: CSC324
Prerequisite: CSCB38F/S [strongly recommended: CSCB58F/S]
Session: Winter Day

MATC31F Combinatorics


Telephone ID #: 20433133
A brief survey of the field of discrete mathematics with emphasis on problem solving. Elementary counting, generating functions and difference equations, permutations with restriction, Polya counting, graphs, network flow problems, balanced incomplete block designs, incidence structures.
Prerequisite: MATB44F/S (CSCB38F/S) & at least one other B-level course in mathematics or computer science.
Session: Winter Day

CSCC50F Numerical Algebra and Optimization


Telephone ID #: 03735033
The efficiency and stability of solution techniques for systems of linear equations and least squares problems, including LU- and QR-based methods. Algorithms for optimization problems, including linear programming, and for systems of nonlinear equations.
Exclusion: CSC336H, CSC350
Prerequisite: [CSCA57F/S or CSCB70F/S (CSCA68F/S)] & MATA04Y & MATB41F/S & MATB42F/S
Session: Winter Day





CSCC51S Numerical Approximation, Integration and Ordinary Differential Equations


Telephone ID #: 03735153
Analysis of methods for approximation, integration, and the solution of ordinary differential equations. Emphasis on the convergence and stability properties of the algorithms, rather than on their implementation.
Exclusion: ACT323H, CSC336H, (JMCC51F/S), CSC351
Prerequisite: [CSCA57F/S or CSCB70F/S (CSCA68)] & MATA04Y & MATB41F/S & MATB42F/S
Recommended Preparation: CSCC50F/S
Session: Winter Day

CSCC64S Effective and Efficient Computing


Telephone ID #: 03736453
Measuring algorithm performance. Techniques of efficient algorithm design: divide and conquer, greedy method, dynamic programming, graph traversal, change of representation. Introduction to complexity theory: models of computation, P, NP, polynomial time reduction, NP-completeness. Introduction to the theory of computation: Church's thesis, computable and uncomputable functions, recursive and recursively enumerable sets, universality, many-one reduction.
Exclusion: CSC364
Prerequisite: CSCB38F/S
Session: Winter Day

CSCC78F Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis


Telephone ID #: 03737833
Abstract data types such as priority queues and dictionaries. Advanced data structures for main memory resident information, such as binomial heaps, leftist trees, self-adjusting lists and balanced search trees. Algorithm analysis: worst case, average case, and amortized complexity. Introduction to lower bounds. Emphasis is given to problem solving and a theoretical treatment of the data structures.
Exclusion: CSC378
Prerequisite: CSCB70F/S & CSCB38F/S
Session: Winter Day

CSCC85F Microprocessor Systems


Telephone ID #: 03738533
A study of hardware and software aspects of microcomputers and microprocessors.
This course will examine instruction sets, addressing modes, memory devices, bus structures. Input/output and interrupt mechanisms. Assembly language and high-level language programming. System and applications software. Laboratory experiments will provide hands-on experience.
Enrolment limit: 45
Exclusion: ECE385
Prerequisite: CSCB58F/S & PHYA10F/A21S or PHYA20F/A21S (PHYA01Y) or PHYA31S (PHYA11S) or permission of instructor
Session: Winter Day

CSCD94H Computer Science Project


Telephone ID #: 03749443
This half-course involves a significant project in any area of computer science. The project may be undertaken individually or in small groups. The course is offered by arrangement with a computer science faculty member, at Scarborough or the St. George campus.
This course is intended for students specializing in computer science. It can be taken as an F or S course in a single term, or as an H course spread over an entire winter or summer session. Projects must be completed by the last day of classes in the term or session the course is taken.
Students are advised that they must obtain consent from the supervising instructor before registering for this course.
Exclusion: CSC494
Prerequisite: [Three C-level computer science half- courses] & [a GPA of 2.50] & [permission of the programme supervisor].
Enrolment procedures: Project supervisor's note of agreement to be presented to the programme supervisor by whom a special permission will be issued for registration.
Session: Winter Day

CSCD95H Computer Science Project

Telephone ID #: 03749543

Same description as CSCD94H. Normally a student may not take two project half-courses on closely related topics or with the same supervisor.

If an exception is made allowing a second project on a topic closely related to the topic of an earlier project, higher standards will be applied in judging it. We expect that a student with the experience of a first project completed will be able to perform almost at the level of a graduate student.

Students are advised that they must obtain consent from the supervising instructor before registering for this course.

Exclusion: CSC495

Session: Winter Day

Courses Not Offered in 1997/98


MATC32F Graph Theory and Algorithms for its Applications
Prerequisite: MATB31F/S (MATB44) or CSCB38F/S and at least one other B-level course in Mathematics or Computer Science
CSCC54F/S Computer-Based Simulation Models
Exclusion: CSC354
Prerequisite: CSCB70F/S (CSCA68F/S) & STAB47F/S
CSCD18S Computer Graphics
Exclusion: CSC418
Prerequisite: MATA04, CSCB09 (up to 1997) CSCB70 (from 1997), CSCC50/CSCC51
CSCD34S Data Management Systems
Exclusion: CSC434
Prerequisite: CSCB28, CSCC78

Full Listing of Courses Not Offered


Back to Chemistry | On to Environmental Science | Up to Index | Search the Calendar