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International Development Studies

Faculty List
  • A. Berry, B.A. (Western), M.A. (Yale), Ph.D. (Princeton), Professor Emeritus
  • M.F. Bunce, B.A. (Sheffield), Ph.D. (Sheffield), Associate Professor Emeritus
  • A.G. Price, B.Sc. (Wales), M.Sc., Ph.D. (McGill), Associate Professor Emeritus
  • E.C. Relph, B.A., M.Phil. (London), Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor Emeritus
  • A.E. Birn, B.A. (Harvard), M.A. (University of Canterbury), Sc.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor
  • J. Teichman, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), FRSC, Professor
  • N. Kortenaar, M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor
  • S. Bamford, B.S. (Michigan Technological University), Ph.D. (George Washington University), Assosiate Professor
  • M. Hoffmann, B.S. (Michigan Technological University), Ph.D. (George Washington University), Associate Professor
  • P-c. Hsiung, B.A. (National Chun-sing), M.A. (Chinese Cultural), M.A., Ph.D. (UCLA), Associate Professor
  • M. Hunter, B.A. (Sussex), M.A. (Univ. of Natal), Ph.D. (Univ California, Berkeley), Associate Professor
  • P. Kingston, B.A. (Toronto), M.A. (London), D.Phil. (Oxford), Associate Professor
  • C. Norrlof, B.A., M.A. (Lund), Ph.D. (Geneva), Associate Professor
  • K. MacDonald, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Waterloo), Associate Professor
  • S.J. Rockel, M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Associate Professor
  • T. Kepe, B. Agric. (Fort Hare), M.Sc. (Guelph), Ph.D. (Univ. Western Cape), Associate Professor
  • A. Ahmed, B.A., M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (McGill), Assistant Professor
  • L. Bisaillon, B.A. (Bishop's), M.Pl. (McGill), Ph.D. (Ottawa), Assistant Professor
  • B. Dahl, B.A. (U.C. San Diego), M.A., Ph.D. (Chicago), Assistant Professor 
  • G. Frazer, M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Yale), Assistant Professor
  • D. Fu, B.A. (Minnesota), M.Phil, Ph.D. (Oxford), Assistant Professor
  • M.E. Isaac, B.Sc., M.Sc. (Guelph), Ph.D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor
  • R. Isakson, Ph.D. Assistant Professor
  • M. Kale, M.A., Ph.D (Laval and Nice), Assistant Professor
  • C. Krupa, B.A., M.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (California, Davis), Assistant Professor
  • A. Martin, B.A. (Guelph), M.F.C., Ph.D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor
  • S. Mollett, B.A., M.E.S. (York), Ph.D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor
  • L. Mortensen, B.A. (Cornell), M.A., Ph.D. (Indiana), Assistant Professor
  • K. Moskowitz, B.A. (Grinnell), M.A. (Emory), Ph.D. (Emory, expected 2014), Assistant Professor
  • R. Salem, M.A. (Oxford), Ph.D. (Princeton), Assistant Professor
  • J. Sharma, M.A. (Hindu), M.Phil. (Delhi), Ph.D. (Cantab), Assistant Professor
  • B. von Lieres, B.A., M.A. (Witwatersrand, South Africa), D.Phil (Essex), Assistant Professor
  • L. Chan, B.A., M.A. (Toronto), Senior Lecturer
  • S. Siccha, MHSc, Msc, PhD (Toronto), Lecturer

Associate Director: L. Chan

Program Advisor: Marishka Pereira Email: ccds-advisor@utsc.utoronto.ca

Our programs provide students with a critical understanding of international development issues through exposure to a variety of academic disciplines, cultures, and, in the case of the specialist co-op program, an overseas work experience in the field of international development. The IDS programs are challenging and intended for bright and self motivated students who are interested in both excelling academically and actively engaging themselves in the pursuit of social justice around such issues as poverty, inequality, and oppression. The students in the IDS programs take initiatives, seek empowerment, are driven to solve social and environmental problems, understand the importance of teamwork and coordination, and are responsible and accountable. They have diverse interests that span the social sciences, humanities, and environmental science, all of which is underpinned by a strong sense of social responsibility.

The IDS programs provide students with a critical understanding of international development issues through exposure to a variety of academic disciplines, cultures, and, in the case of the specialist co-op program, an overseas work experience in the field of international development.  The specific academic objectives of our IDS programs are to: 

1. Introduce students to the broad and inter-connected range of issues and disciplinary approaches within the field of critical development studies.
2. Provide students with a critical understanding of development theories - their origins and purposes for addressing problems of power, inequality and oppression.
3. Stress the crucial importance of context and power - historical, social-cultural, economic, and political - when critically analyzing development theory and development practice.
4. Promote the development of strong analytical, writing, and professional skills and, where possible, experiential learning opportunities in the field of critical development studies.
5. Promote the development of a vibrant intellectual community - that includes students, faculty, administrators, alumni, and development partners -- that is committed to active involvement in the critical debates within the field of development studies and to critical engagement in development practice.

As a way of enhancing the interdisciplinary nature of the IDS programs, students are also encouraged to consider complementing their particular program in IDS with a parallel program in a related discipline. For example, those doing a Major in IDS might consider a parallel Major or Minor in any one of anthroplogy, environmental sciences, environmental studies, economics, geography, health studies, history, political science, public policy, sociology or women's and gender studies. While not required for graduation, Specialist students (co-op or non-co-op) are also encouraged to consider fulfilling the requirements for a Major or Minor program in a related discipline along side their Specialist IDS program. For details about how these joint programs can be worked out, please contact the Program Advisor.

Guidelines for 1st year course selection
Students intending to complete any currently offered IDS program should include the following required courses in their first year selection:

IDS Specialist (BSc) and Co-Operative Specialist (BSc) should enroll in IDSA01H3, EESA01H3, BIOA01H3, BIOA02H3, CHMA10H3, CHMA11H3, [MGEA01H3 or MGEA02H3], [MGEA05H3 or MGEA06H3]. 

IDS Specialist (BA) and Co-Operative Specialist (BA) should enroll in IDSA01H3, EESA01H3, [MGEA01H3 or MGEA02H3], [MGEA05H3 or MGEA06H3]. 

IDS Major (BA) should enroll in IDSA01H3.

International Development Studies Programs

SPECIALIST (CO-OPERATIVE) PROGRAM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (ARTS)

Co-op Contact: askcoop@utsc.utoronto.ca
The Co-operative Program in International Development Studies (B.A.) at University of Toronto Scarborough, is a five year undergraduate Program which aims to provide students with a critical understanding of international development issues through exposure to a variety of academic disciplines and to another culture. The Program combines interdisciplinary academic study in the social and environmental sciences and humanities with a practical work experience in a developing country. IDS students graduate with an Honours B.A. with a Specialist certification in International Development Studies.

Program Admission

Enrolment in the Program is limited. Interviews are normally held from January until May for students who pass the initial screening. Admissions are granted on the basis of the applicants' academic performance, background in relevant subjects, language skills, extra-curricular involvement, experience or interest in international development studies and work. For information on fees and status in the Program, please see the Co-operative Programs section of this Calendar.

Prospective Applicants: For direct admission from secondary school or for students who wish to transfer to U of T Scarborough from another U of T faculty or from another post-secondary institution, see the Co-operative Programs section in this Calendar.

Current U of T Scarborough students: Application procedures can be found at the Registrar's Office website at: www.utsc.utoronto.ca/subjectpost. The minimum qualifications for entry are 4.0 credits and a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. An interview is required.

Work Placement
This Program requires twenty courses (four years) of study and one work term of eight to twelve months in duration. The work term will normally begin between April and September of the third year. The IDS work term is an integral part of the co-op curriculum and is designed to provide students with practical hands on experience in a developing country. The majority of work terms are with Canadian NGOs, research institutes or private sector consulting firms. The location of placements will vary according to each student's disciplinary and regional preferences and abilities, the availability of positions, and the practicability and safety of the area. Placement employers are asked to cover the living allowance of the student. Those students who choose to carry out their placement with no funding will be asked to finance the living allowance themselves.

Students are required to submit progress reports every 2 months and begin work on a major research project. To be eligible for placement, students must have completed 14.5 full credits including 12.0 IDS credits. These 12 must include IDSC01H3, IDSC04H3 plus 9.5 other credits from Requirements 1 through 4. For information about status in the co-op program, fees, and regulations, please see the Co-operative Programs section of this Calendar.

Students who successfully complete all requirements associated with a work term are awarded credit, these credits being additional to the 20.0 normally required for the degree. Work terms are evaluated by program faculty, the co-op office, and the employer, and a grade of CR (credit)/NCR (no credit) is recorded on the transcript.

IDS Co-op Tutorial and Pre-Departure Orientation
In addition to the academic course requirements for the IDS Co-op program, students are required to complete two additional non-credit courses. These courses are taken in the first and third year of the program with the aim of providing students with the skills and knowledge they need to successfully navigate the placement experience. For students who gain entry in second year, they will complete the first year course in their second year. Both of these courses are non-credit courses taken over-and-above a full course load in the first year.

First Year:
During the first year of study, students must successfully complete a non-credit IDS Co-op Placement Course (also referred to as Passport to Placement). This course will include resume, covering letters, and interview workshops, along with networking sessions, speaker panels, and work-term expectations. This course must be completed prior to beginning the Third Year course.

Third Year:
Following the successful completion of the Year 1 course, students are required to participate in a second non-credit Co-op course commencing at the end of the year in which they complete 10.0 credits, and continuing through the following year - usually third year (the pre-placement year). This course will include presentations, group exercises and individual assignments designed to prepare students for the placement experience. There are mandatory sessions on cross-cultural understanding, health and safety issues on placement, researching for the IDSD01Y3 thesis, and other key topics. A weekend retreat with the fifth years (who have returned from placement) provides the opportunity for sharing of first-hand experience. Students must successfully complete this course in order to be eligible for placement.

Program Requirements
This program requires 15.0 full credits, of which at least 4.0 must be at the C- or D-level including at least 1.0 at the D-level.

Students must complete requirements 1-5 of the requirements for the Specialist (Non-co-op B.A.) Program in International Development Studies, except for IDSD02H3, plus the following:

  • 1.0 full credit in a second language
  • IDSC01H3 Research Design for Development Fieldwork (must be taken prior to co-op placement)
  • IDSD01Y3 Post-placement Seminar and Thesis
SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (ARTS)

Program Requirements
This program requires 13.0 full credits of which at least 4.0 must be at the C- or D-level including at least 1.0 at the D-level.

  1. Introduction to International Development Studies (2.0 full credits as follows)
    IDSA01H3 Introduction to International Development Studies
    [MGEA01H3 Introduction to Microeconomics or MGEA02H3 Introduction to Microeconomics: A Mathematical Approach]
    [MGEA05H3 Introduction to Macroeconomics or MGEA06H3 Introduction to Macroeconomics: A Mathematical Approach]
    EESA01H3 Introduction to Environmental Science

  2. Core courses in International Development (3.0 full credits as follows)
    IDSB01H3 Political Economy of International Development
    IDSB02H3 Development and Environment
    IDSB04H3 Introduction to International/Global Health
    IDSB06H3 Equity, Ethics and Justice in International Development
    POLB90H3 Comparative Development in International Perspective
    POLB91H3 Comparative Development in Political Perspective

  3. Methods for International Development Studies (1.5 full credits as follows)
    IDSC04H3 Project Management I
    0.5 credit in Quantitative/statistical methods from the following:
       ANTC35H3 Quantitative Methods in Anthropology
       MGEB11H3 Quantitative Methods in Economics I
       GGRA30H3 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Empirical Reasoning
       GGRB30H3 Fundamentals of GIS I
       HLTB15H3 Introduction to Health Research Methodology
       STAB22H3 Statistics I
    0.5 FCE in Qualitative methods from the following:
       ANTB19H3 Ethnography and the Comparative Study of Human Societies
       GGRC31H3 Qualitative Geographical Methods: Place and Ethnography
       HLTC04H3 Critical Qualitative Health Research Methods
       POLC78H3 Political Analysis I

  4. Research in International Development Requirement (0.5 credit):
    IDSD02H3 Advanced Seminar in Critical Development Studies: Theory and Policy

  5. Specialized Courses: Approaches to International Development (6.0 full credits)
    A minimum of 2.0 full credits must be chosen from two different clusters below for a total of 4.0 full credits. The other 2.0 full credits may be selected from any of the courses listed below, and IDSA02H3/AFSA03H3, IDSC07H3, IDSC10H3, IDSD10H3, IDSD14H3 and IDSD15H3 may also be counted towards the completion of this requirement.

    Media and Development
    ANTC53H3 Anthropology of Media and Publics
    GASC40H3/MDSC40H3 Chinese Media and Politics
    GASC41H3/MDSC41H3 Media and Popular Culture in East and Southeast Asia
    IDSB10H3 Knowledge and Communication for Development
    IDSC08H3 Media and Development
    MDSB05H3/GASB05H3 Media and Globalization
    MDSB61H3 Mapping New Media
    SOCC44H3 Media and Society
    VPHB50H3 Africa Through the Photographic Lens

    Culture and Society

    ANTB05H3/AFSB05H3 Culture and Society in Africa
    ANTB20H3 Culture, Politics and Globalization
    ANTB64H3 The Anthropology of Food
    ANTC10H3 Anthropological Perspectives on Development
    ANTC34H3 The Anthropology of Transnationalism
    ANTC66H3 Anthropology of Tourism
    GGRD14H3 Social Justice and the City
    HISB51H3/AFSB51H3 Twentieth Century Africa
    HISB57H3/GASB57H3 Sub-Continental Histories: South Asia in the World
    HISC29H3 Global Commodities: Nature, Culture, History
    HISC55H3 War and Society in Modern Africa
    IDSD06H3 Feminist and Postcolonial Perspectives in Development Studies
    SOCC25H3 Ethnicity, Race and Migration
    SOCC29H3 Special Topics in Sociology of Family
    SOCC34H3 Migrations & Transnationalisms
    SOCC58H3 Global Transformations: Politics, Economy & Society

    Economics of Development

    ANTC19H3 Producing People and Things: Economics and Social Life
    MGEB32H3 Economic Aspects of Public Policy
    MGEB60H3 Comparative Economic Systems
    MGEC21H3 Classics in the History of Economic Thought
    MGEC61H3 International Economics: Finance
    MGEC62H3 International Economics: Trade Theory
    MGEC81H3 Economic Development
    MGEC82H3 Development Policy
    MGED63H3 Financial Crises: Causes, Consequences and Policy Implications
    IDSC12H3 Economics of Small Enterprise and Micro-Credit
    IDSC14H3 The Political Economy of Food
    GGRC48H3 Geographaies of Urban Poverty
    POLC98H3 International Political Economy of Finance

    Environment and Land Use
    ANTB01H3 Political Ecology
    EESB16H3 Feeding Humans - the Cost to the Planet
    EESB17H3 Hydro Politics and Transboundary Water Resources Management
    GGRB21H3 Environments and Environmentalisms
    GGRC10H3 Urbanization and Development
    GGRC22H3 Political Ecology Theory and Application
    GGRC25H3 Land Reform and Development
    GGRC44H3 Environmental Conservation and Sustainable Development
    GGRC49H3 Land, Development, and Stuggle in Latin America
    IDSC02H3 Environmental Science and Evidence-Based Policy
    IDSD07H3/AFSD07H3 Extractive Industries in Africa

    Gender, Health and Development

    ANTC14H3 Feminism and Anthropology
    ANTC15H3 Genders and Sexualities
    ANTC61H3 Medical Anthropology: Illness and Healing in Cultural Perspective
    GGRB28H3 Geographies of Disease
    GGRD10H3 Health and Sexuality
    HLTC02H3 Women and Health: Past and Present
    IDSC11H3 Issues in Global and International Health
    POLC94H3 Globalization, Gender and Development
    WSTC10H3 Women and Development
    WSTC11H3 Applied Study in Women and Development

    Politics and Policy

    IDSC11H3 Issues in Global and International Health
    IDSC17H3 Development, Citizen Action and Social Change in the Global South
    IDSC18H3 New Paradigms in Development: The Role of Emerging Powers
    IDSD19H3 The Role of Researcher-Practitioner Engagement in Development
    POLB80H3 Introduction to International Relations I
    POLB81H3 Introduction to International Relations II
    POLC09H3 International Security: Conflict, Crisis and War
    POLC16H3 Chinese Politics
    POLC37H3 Global Justice
    POLC80H3 International Relations of Africa
    POLC87H3 International Cooperation and Institutions
    POLC88H3 The New International Agenda
    POLC90H3 Development Studies: Political and Historical Perspectives
    POLC91H3 Latin America: Dictatorship and Democracy
    POLC96H3 State Formation and Authoritarianism in the Middle East
    POLC97H3 Protest Politics in the Middle East
    POLC99H3 Latin America: Politics of the Dispossessed
    POLD09H3 International Relations of Ethnic Conflict
    POLD87H3 Rational Choice and International Cooperation
    POLD90H3 Public Policy and Human Development in the Global South
    POLD92H3 Survival and Demise of Dictatorships
    POLD94H3 Selected Topics on Developing Areas
SPECIALIST (CO-OPERATIVE) PROGRAM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (SCIENCE)

Co-op Contact: askcoop@utsc.utoronto.ca
The Co-operative Program in International Development Studies (B.Sc.) at the University of Toronto Scarborough, is a five year undergraduate Program which aims to provide students with a critical understanding of international development issues through exposure to a variety of academic disciplines and to another culture. The Program combines interdisciplinary academic study in the social and environmental sciences and humanities with a practical work experience in a developing country. IDS students graduate with an Honours B.Sc. with a Specialist certification in International Development Studies.

Program Admission
Enrolment in the Program is limited. Interviews are normally held from January until May for students who pass the initial screening. Admissions are granted on the basis of the applicants' academic performance, background in relevant subjects, language skills, extra-curricular involvement, experience or interest in international development studies and work. For information on fees and status in the Program, please see the Co-operative Programs section of this Calendar.

Prospective Applicants: For direct admission from secondary school or for students who wish to transfer to U of T Scarborough from another U of T faculty or from another post-secondary institution, see the Co-operative Programs section in this Calendar.

Current U of T Scarborough students: Application procedures can be found at the Registrar's Office website at: www.utsc.utoronto.ca/subjectpost. The minimum qualifications for entry are 4.0 credits and a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. An interview is required.

Work Placement
This Program requires twenty courses (four years) of study and one work term of eight to twelve months in duration. The work term will normally begin between May and September of the third year. The IDS work term is an integral part of the co-op curriculum and is designed to provide students with practical hands on experience in a developing country. The majority of work terms are with Canadian NGOs, research institutes or private sector consulting firms. The location of placements will vary according to each student's disciplinary and regional preferences and abilities, the availability of positions, and the practicability and safety of the area. Placement employers are asked to cover the living allowance of the student. Those students who choose to carry out their placement with no funding will be asked to finance the living allowance themselves.

Students are required to submit progress reports every 2 months and begin work on a major research project. To be eligible for placement, students must have completed 14.5 full credits including 12.0 IDS credits. These 12 must include IDSC01H3, IDSC04H3 plus 9.5 other credits from Requirements 1 through 6. For information about status in the co-op program, fees, and regulations, please see the Co-operative Programs section of this Calendar.

Students who successfully complete all requirements associated with a work term are awarded credit, these credits being additional to the 20.0 normally required for the degree. Work terms are evaluated by program faculty, the co-op office, and the employer, and a grade of CR (credit)/NCR (no credit) is recorded on the transcript.

IDS Co-op Tutorial and Pre-Departure Orientation
In addition to the academic course requirements for the IDS Co-op program, students are required to complete two additional non-credit courses. These courses are taken in the first and third year of the program with the aim of providing students with the skills and knowledge they need to successfully navigate the placement experience. For students who gain entry in second year, they will complete the first year course in their second year. Both of these courses are non-credit courses taken over-and-above a full course load in the first year.

First Year:
During the first year of study, students must successfully complete a non-credit IDS Co-op Placement Course (also referred to as Passport to Placement). This course will include resume, covering letters, and interview workshops, along with networking sessions, speaker panels, and work-term expectations. This course must be completed prior to the Third Year course.

Third Year:
Following the successful completion of the Year 1 course, students are required to participate in a second non-credit Co-op course commencing at the end of the year in which they complete 10.0 credits, and continuing through the following year - usually third year (the pre-placement year). This course will include presentations, group exercises and individual assignments designed to prepare students for the placement experience. There are mandatory sessions on cross-cultural understanding, health and safety issues on placement, researching for the IDSD01Y3 thesis, and other key topics. A weekend retreat with the fifth years (who have returned from placement) provides the opportunity for sharing of first-hand experience. Students must successfully complete this course in order to be eligible for placement.

Program Requirements:

This program requires 16.0 credits of which at least 4.0 must be at the C-or D- level including at least 1.0 at the D-level.

1. Introduction to International Development Studies (2.0 credits)
   IDSA01H3 Introduction to International Development Studies
   [MGEA01H3 Introduction to Microeconomics or MGEA02H3 Introduction to Microeconomics: A Mathematical Approach]
   [MGEA05H3 Introduction to Macroeconomics or MGEA06H3 Introduction to Macroeconomics: A Mathematical Approach]
    EESA01H3 Introduction to Environmental Science

2. Core courses in International Development (3.0 credits)
    IDSB01H3 Political Economy of International Development
    IDSB02H3 Development and Environment
    IDSB04H3 Introduction to International/Global Health
    IDSB06H3 Equity, Ethics and Justice in International Development
    POLB90H3 Comparative Development in International Perspective
    POLB91H3 Comparative Development in Political Perspective

3. Methods for International Development Studies (1.5 credits)
    IDSC04H3 Project Management I
    0.5 credit in Quantitative/statistical methods from the following:
       ANTC35H3 Quantitative Methods in Anthropology
       MGEB11H3 Quantitative Methods in Economics I
       GGRA30H3 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Empirical Reasoning
       GGRB30H3 Fundamentals of GIS I
       HLTB15H3 Introduction to Health Research Methodology
       STAB22H3 Statistics I
    0.5 FCE in Qualitative Methods from the following:
       ANTB19H3 Ethnography and the Comparative Study of Human Societies
       GGRC31H3 Qualitative Geographical Methods: Place and Ethnography
       HLTC04H3 Critical Qualitative Health Research Methods
       POLC78H3 Political Analysis I

4. Specialized Courses: Core (3.0 credits)
    BIOA01H3 Life on Earth: Unifying Principles
    BIOA02H3 Life on Earth: Form, Function and Interactions
    CHMA10H3 Introductory Chemistry I: Structure and Bonding
    CHMA11H3 Introductory Chemistry II: Reactions and Mechanisms
    MATA30H3 Calculus I for Biological and Physical Sciences
    [PHYA10H3 or PHYA11H3 Introduction to Physics IA or IB]

5. 1.0 credit from:
    BIOB50H3 Ecology
   
    CHMB55H3 Environmental Chemistry
   
    EESB02H3 Principles of Geomorphology
   
    EESB03H3 Principles of Climatology
   
    EESB04H3 Principles of Hydrology
   
    EESB05H3 Principles of Soil Science
   
    EESB15H3 Earth History
   
    EESB16H3 Feeding Humans- The Cost to the Planet
   
    EESB17H3 Hydro Politics and Transboundary Water Resource Management
   
    GGRC22H3 Political Ecology Theory and Applications
   
    GGRC26H3 Geographies of Environmental Governance
   
    GGRC44H3 Environmental Conservation and Sustainable Development

    IDSC02H3 Environmental Science and Evidence-Based Policy   
    PSCB57H3 Introduction to Scientific Computing

6. 3.0 credits from C- and D-level EES courses, with at least 0.5 credits at the D-level, from the following:
    EESC04H3 Biodiversity and Biogeography
    EESC07H3 Groundwater
    EESC13H3 Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing
    EESC20H3 Geochemistry
    EESC21H3 Urban Environmental Problems of the Greater Toronto Area
    EESD02H3 Contaminant Hydrogeology
    EESD06H3 Climate Change Impact Assessment
    EESD11H3 Process Hydrology
    EESD15H3 Cleaning Up Our Mess: Remediation of Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments

7. Co-operative, Language and Thesis Requirements (2.5 credits):
    1.0 full credits in a second language

    IDSC01H3 Research Design for Development Fieldwork* (*must be taken prior to co-op placement)

    IDSD01Y3 Post-placement Seminar and Thesis

SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (SCIENCE)

Program Requirements:

This program requires 14.0 credits of which at least 4.0 must be at the C-or D- level including at least 1.0 at the D-level.

1. Introduction to International Development Studies (2.0 credits):
IDSA01H3 Introduction to International Development Studies
[MGEA01H3 Introduction to Microeconomics or MGEA02H3 Introduction to Microeconomics: A Mathematical Approach]
[MGEA05H3 Introduction to Macroeconomics or MGEA06H3 Introduction to Macroeconomics: A Mathematical Approach]
EESA01H3 Introduction to Environmental Science

2. Core courses in International Development (3.0 credits):
IDSB01H3 Political Economy of International Development
IDSB02H3 Development and Environment
IDSB04H3 Introduction to International/Global Health
IDSB06H3 Equity, Ethics and Justice in International Development
POLB90H3 Comparative Development in International Perspective
POLB91H3 Comparative Development in Political Perspective

3. Methods for International Development Studies (1.5 credits):
IDSC04H3 Project Management I
0.5 credit in Quantitative/statistical methods from the following:
   ANTC35H3 Quantitative Methods in Anthropology
   MGEB11H3 Quantitative Methods in Economics I
   GGRA30H3 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Empirical Reasoning
   GGRB30H3 Fundamentals of GIS I
   HLTB15H3 Introduction to Health Research Methodology
   STAB22H3 Statistics I
0.5 FCE in Qualitative Methods from the following:
   ANTB19H3 Ethnography and the Comparative Study of Human Societies
   GGRC31H3 Qualitative Geographical Methods: Place and Ethnography
   HLTC04H3 Critical Qualitative Health Research Methods
   POLC78H3 Political Analysis I

4. Specialized Core Courses (3.0 credits):
BIOA01H3 Life on Earth: Unifying Principles
BIOA02H3 Life on Earth: Form, Function and Interactions
CHMA10H3 Introductory Chemistry I: Structure and Bonding
CHMA11H3 Introductory Chemistry II: Reactions and Mechanisms
MATA30H3 Calculus I for Biological and Physical Sciences
[PHYA10H3 or PHYA11H3 Introduction to Physics IA or IB]

5. 1.0 credits from:
BIOB50H3 Ecology
CHMB55H3 Environmental Chemistry
EESB02H3 Principles of Geomorphology
EESB03H3 Principles of Climatology
EESB04H3 Principles of Hydrology
EESB05H3 Principles of Soil Science
EESB15H3 Earth History
EESB16H3 Feeding Humans- The Cost to the Planet
EESB17H3 Hydro Politics and Transboundary Water Resource Management
GGRC22H3 Political Ecology Theory and Applications
GGRC26H3 Geographies of Environmental Governance
GGRC44H3 Environmental Conservation and Sustainable Development
IDSC02H3 Environmental Science and Evidence-Based Policy
PSCB57H3 Introduction to Scientific Computing

6. 3.0 credits from C- and D-level EES courses, with at least 0.5 credits at the D-level, from the following:
EESC04H3 Biodiversity and Biogeography
EESC07H3 Groundwater
EESC13H3 Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing
EESC20H3 Geochemistry
EESC21H3 Urban Environmental Problems of the Greater Toronto Area
EESD02H3 Contaminant Hydrogeology
EESD06H3 Climate Change Impact Assessment
EESD11H3 Process Hydrology
EESD15H3 Cleaning Up Our Mess: Remediation of Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments

7. Research in International Development Requirement (0.5 credit):
IDSD02H3 Advanced Seminar in Critical Development Studies: Theory and Policy

MAJOR PROGRAM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (ARTS)

Program Requirements
This program requires 8.0 full credits of which at least 2.0 must be at the C- or D-level.

  1. Introduction to International Development Studies (0.5 credits)
    IDSA01H3 Introduction to International Development Studies
  2. Core courses in International Development (1.5 credits)
    1.5 full credits from the following:
    IDSB01H3 Political Economy of International Development
    IDSB02H3 Development and Environment
    IDSB04H3 Introduction to International/Global Health
    IDSB06H3 Equity, Ethics and Justice in International Development
    POLB90H3 Comparative Development in International Perspective
    (Students wishing to take IDSB01H3 should be aware that there are A-level prerequisites for this course.)
  3. Methods for International Development Studies (1.5 credits)
    IDSC04H3 Project Management I
    0.5 credits in quantitative/statistical methods from the following:
       ANTC35H3 Quantitative Methods in Anthropology
       MGEB11H3 Quantitative Methods in Economics I
       GGRA30H3 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Empirical Reasoning
       GGRB30H3 Fundamentals of GIS I
       HLTB15H3 Introduction to Health Research Methodology
       STAB22H3 Statistics I
    0.5 credits in qualitative methods from the following:
       ANTB19H3 Ethnography and the Comparative Study of Human Societies
       HLTC04H3 Critical Qualitative Health Research Methods
       GGRC31H3 Qualitative Geographical Methods: Place and Ethnography
       POLC78H3 Political Analysis I
  4. Specialized Courses (4.5 credits)
    4.5 credits from the courses listed in Requirement 5 of the B.A. version of the Specialist program in IDS with at least 1.0 credit from each of TWO of the clusters. POLB91H3 may be counted toward this requirement.
MAJOR PROGRAM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (SCIENCE)

Enrolment in Major Program in International Development Studies (BSc) has been suspended indefinitely. Students who first enrolled at UTSC prior to the 2010 Summer Session should refer to the 2009/2010 UTSC Calendar.

MINOR PROGRAM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES (ARTS)

The Minor Program in International Development Studies has been closed, effective January 12, 2010. Students who enrolled prior to the 2010 Summer Session should refer to the 2009-10 UTSC Calendar. Every effort will be made to ensure that students currently enrolled in the program are able to complete it.

International Development Studies Courses


IDSA01H3    Introduction to International Development Studies

History, theory and practice of international development, and current approaches and debates in international development studies. The course explores the evolution of policy and practice in international development and the academic discourses that surround it. Lectures by various faculty and guests will explore the multi-disciplinary nature of international development studies. This course is a prerequisite for all IDS B-level courses.

Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSA02H3    Experiencing Development in Africa

This experiential learning course allows students to experience first hand the realities, challenges, and opportunities of working with development organizations in Africa. The goal is to allow students to actively engage in research, decision-making, problem solving, partnership building, and fundraising, processes that are the key elements of development work.
Same as AFSA03H3

Prerequisite: AFSA01H3 or IDSA01H3
Exclusion: AFSA03H3
Enrolment Limits: 25
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSB01H3    Political Economy of International Development

Introduces students to major development problems, focusing on international economic and political economy factors. Examines trade, aid, international institutions such as the World Bank, the IMF and the WTO. Examines both conventional economic perspectives as well as critiques of these perspectives. This course can be counted for credit in ECM Programs.

Prerequisite: [MGEA01H3/(ECMA01H3) and MGEA05H3/(ECMA05H3)] or [MGEA02H3/(ECMA04H3) and MGEA06H3/(ECMA06H3)] and IDSA01H3
Exclusion: ECO230Y
Enrolment Limits: 170
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSB02H3    Development and Environment

The environmental consequences of development activities with emphasis on tropical countries. Environmental change in urban, rainforest, semi-arid, wetland, and mountainous systems. The influences of development on the global environment; species extinction, loss of productive land, reduced access to resources, declining water quality and quantity, and climate change.

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3 or EESA01H3
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

IDSB04H3    Introduction to International/Global Health

 This course offers an introduction to the institutional, social, economic, epidemiological, ideological, and political forces in the field of international/global health. While considerable reference will be made to "high-income" countries, the major emphasis will be on the health conditions of "low-income" countries -- as well as the interaction of these conditions with the international aid system. After setting the historical and political economy context, the course will explore key topics and themes in international/global health including: international health agencies and activities; data on health; epidemiology and the global distribution of health and disease; the societal determinants of health and social inequalities in health; health economics and the organization of health care systems in comparative context; globalization, trade, work, and health; health and the environment; the ingredients of healthy societies across the world; and Canada's/your/civil society's role in global health policy-making.

Prerequisite: 5.0 full credits including IDSA01H3
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSB06H3    Equity, Ethics and Justice in International Development

What constitutes equitable, ethical as well as socially and environmentally just processes and outcomes of development? This course explores these questions with particular emphasis on their philosophical and ideological foundations and on the challenges of negotiating global differences in cultural, political and environmental values in international development.

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3
Breadth Requirement: History, Philosophy & Cultural Studies

IDSB10H3    Knowledge and Communication for Development

Examines in-depth the roles of information and communication technology (ICT) in knowledge production and their impact on development. Do new forms of social media make communication more effective, equitable, or productive in the globalized world? How has network media changed governance, advocacy, and information flow and knowledge exchange and what do these mean for development?

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3
Exclusion: (ISTB01H3)
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences
NOTE: Effective Summer 2013 this course will not be delivered online; instead, it will be delivered as an in-class seminar.

IDSC01H3    Research Design for Development Fieldwork

Examines research design and methods appropriate to development fieldwork. Provides `hands on' advice (practical, personal and ethical) to those preparing to enter "the field"; or pursuing development work as a career. Students will prepare a research proposal as their main course assignment.

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3 & 9.0 full credits in total including at least 6.0 credits satisfying Requirements 1 through 4 of the Specialist Co-op program
Enrolment Limits: 20. Limited to students enrolled in the Specialist Coop Program in IDS. Students in other IDS programs may be admitted with permission of instructor subject to the availability of spaces.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSC02H3    Environmental Science and Evidence-Based Policy

The role science plays in informing environmental policy is sometimes unclear. Students in this interdisciplinary class will examine key elements associated with generating scientific environmental knowledge, and learn how this understanding can be used to inform and critique environmental policy. Discussions of contemporary domestic and international examples are used to highlight concepts and applications.

Prerequisite: 8.0 credits including EESA01H3
Recommended Preparation: IDSB02H3
Enrolment Limits: 50
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

IDSC04H3    Project Management I

Studies the phases of the project management cycle with emphasis on situational analysis and identification of needs, project implementation, project monitoring and evaluation. Examines basic organizational development, the role of Canadian non-governmental organizations engaged in the delivery of development assistance as well as with CIDA's policies and practices.

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3 and [1.0 credit at the B-level in IDS courses]
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the IDS Specialist and Major programs.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSC06H3    Directed Reading on Canadian Institutions and International Development

This Directed Readings course is designed for students who already have an ongoing working relationship with a Canadian Development institution (both non-government organizations and private agencies). The course will run parallel to the work experience. Students interested in this course must contact and obtain permission from the CCDS Associate Director prior to the beginning of term.

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3 and [1.0 credit at the B-level in IDS courses]
Recommended Preparation: IDSC04H3

IDSC07H3    Project Management II

A case study approach building on Project Management I. Examines: the art of effective communication and negotiation, visioning, participatory and rapid rural appraisal; survey design and implementation; advanced financial management and budgeting; basic bookkeeping and spreadsheet design; results based management; environmental impact assessments; cross-cultural effectiveness; and gender and development.

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3 and IDSC04H3
Enrolment Limits: Limited to students in IDS Specialist and Major programs. Other students may be admitted with permission of instructor.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSC08H3    Media and Development

Critical perspectives on the effects of traditional and 'new' media on development policy and practice. The course examines the increasingly significant role the media plays in the development process, the ways in which media-generated images of development and developing countries affect development policy and the potential of 'new' media for those who are marginalized from the development process.

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3 and IDSB10H3
Enrolment Limits: 35
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSC10H3    Topics in International Development Studies

Contents to be determined by instructor.

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3 & IDSB01H3 & IDSB02H3

IDSC11H3    Issues in Global and International Health

Key global and international health issues are explored in-depth in three learning phases. We begin with a reading and discussion seminar on international/global health policy and politics. (Exact topic changes each year based on student interest and developments in the field). Next, students develop group projects designed to raise awareness around particular global and international health problems, culminating in UTSC International Health Week in the Meeting Place. The third phase --which unfolds throughout the course-- involves individual research projects and class presentations. 

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3 & IDSB04H3
Enrolment Limits: 35
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSC12H3    Economics of Small Enterprise and Microcredit

Considers the role of micro- and small/medium enterprise in the development process, as compared to the larger firms. Identifies the role of smaller enterprises in employment creation and a more equitable distribution of income. Examines policies which can contribute to these outcomes, including micro-credit. This course can be counted for credit in ECM Programs.

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3 and IDSB01H3
Exclusion: (IDSB05H3)
Enrolment Limits: 60
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSC14H3    The Political Economy of Food

Examines how institutions and power relations shape the production and distribution of food, particularly in the global South. The course evaluates competing theories of hunger and malnutrition. It also explores the historical evolution of contemporary food provisioning and evaluates the viability and development potential of alternative food practices.

Prerequisite: IDSB01H3
Enrolment Limits: 35
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSC17H3    Development, Citizen Action and Social Change in the Global South

Explores the question of citizenship through theories of citizen participation and action in dialogue with a wide range of recent empirical case studies from the global south. Going beyond formal rights and status, the course looks at deeper forms of political inclusion and direct participation in decision-making on political and policy issues.

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3 and [1.0 credit at the B-level in IDS courses]
Enrolment Limits: 30
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSC18H3    New Paradigms in Development: The Role of Emerging Powers

This course examines the growing role of the emerging powers - the BRICS countries grouping of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa - in international development. The course examines recent development initiatives by these actors in Africa, Latin America and Asia. It also explores the question of whether BRICS-led development programs and practices challenge the top-down, expert led stances of past development interventions – from colonialism to the western aid era.

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3 and [1.0 credit at the B-level in IDS courses]
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSD01Y3    Post-placement Seminar and Thesis

Normal enrolment in this course will be made up of IDS students who have completed their work placement. Each student will give at least one seminar dealing with their research project and/or placement. The research paper will be the major written requirement for the course, to be submitted no later than mid-March. The course will also include seminars by practicing professionals on a variety of development topics.

Prerequisite: IDSA01H3 & students must have completed the first four years of the IDS Specialist Co-op Program or its equivalent and have completed their placement. Also, permission of the instructor is required.

IDSD02H3    Advanced Seminar in Critical Development Studies: Theory and Policy

An advanced seminar in critical development theory and policy, with an emphasis on perspectives and theories from the global South. Students will write a series of theoretical reflections on contemporary policy issues, that contributes to a final critical development theory paper. Students will present the results of their thinking in a conference setting.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits including IDSC04H3
Enrolment Limits: 25; Restricted to students in the non co-op IDS Specialist programs. If space is available, students from the IDS Major program may gain admission with the permission of the instructor.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

IDSD06H3    Feminist and Postcolonial Perspectives in Development Studies

This interdisciplinary course traces the advance of feminist and postcolonial thinking in development studies.  The course serves as a capstone experience for IDS students and social science majors looking to fully engage with feminist and postcolonial theories of development. This course combines short lectures with student led-discussions and critical analyses of development thought and practice.

Prerequisite: 12.0 credits including IDSA01H3
Recommended Preparation: IDSB06H3
Enrolment Limits: 25
Breadth Requirement: History, Philosophy & Cultural Studies

IDSD07H3    Extractive Industries in Africa

This course examines resource extraction in African history. We examine global trade networks in precolonial Africa, and the transformations brought by colonial extractive economies. Case studies, from diamonds to uranium, demonstrate how the resource curse has affected states and economies, especially in the postcolonial period.
Same as AFSD07H3

Prerequisite: 8.0 credits including [AFSA01H3 or IDSA01H3] and [AFSA03H3/IDSA02H3] and [1.0 credit at the B-level in AFS or IDS courses]
Exclusion: AFSD07H3
Enrolment Limits: 15
Breadth Requirement: History, Philosophy & Cultural Studies

IDSD10H3    Topics in International Development Studies

Contents to be determined by Instructor.

Prerequisite: 12.0 credits, including IDSA01H3
Enrolment Limits: 25

IDSD14H3    Directed Reading

The goal of the course is for students to examine in a more extensive fashion the academic literature on a particular topic in International Development Studies not covered by existing course offering. Courses will normally only be available to students in their final year of study at UTSC. Students must obtain consent from the CCDS Associate Director before registering for this course.


Prerequisite: 12.0 credits, including IDSA01H3

IDSD15H3    Directed Research

The goal of the course is for students to prepare and write a senior undergraduate research paper in International Development Studies. For upper level students whose interests are not covered in one of the other courses normally offered. Courses will normally only be available to students in their final year of study at UTSC. Students must obtain consent from the CCDS Associate Director before registering for this course.


Prerequisite: 12.0 credits including IDSA01H3 and permission of the instructor

IDSD19H3    The Role of Researcher-Practitioner Engagement in Development

This course focuses on recent theories and approaches to researcher-practitioner engagement in development. Using case studies, interviews, and extensive literature review, students will explore whether such engagements offer opportunities for effective social change and improved theory.

Prerequisite: 12.0 credits, including IDSA01H3
Recommended Preparation: IDSC04H3
Enrolment Limits: 25
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

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