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Psychology

Faculty List

  • M. Bagby, B.A. (Tennessee), M.A. (Radford), Ph.D., C. Psych (York), Professor
  • G.B. Biederman, B.Sc. (CUNY), Ph.D. (NYU), Professor Emeritus
  • D.A. Bors, B.A. (Florida), M.A. (Regina), Ph.D. (Toronto), Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, Emeritus
  • J.S. Cant, B.A., M.Sc., Ph.D. (Western), Assistant Professor
  • G.S. Cree, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Western), Associate Professor
  • G.C. Cupchik, B.A. (Michigan), M.A., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor
  • J. Dere, B.A. (McGill), M.Sc. (McGill), Ph.D. (Concordia), Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream
  • K.K. Dion, B.A. (Wellesley), Ph.D. (Minnesota), Professor
  • S. Erb, B.Sc. (Wilfrid Laurier), M.A., Ph.D. (Concordia), Associate Professor
  • J.E. Foley, B.A., Ph.D. (Sydney), Professor Emerita
  • B. Forrin, B.A. (Toronto), M.A., Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor Emeritus
  • M.A. Fournier, B.A., Ph.D. (McGill), Associate Professor
  • D. W. Haley, B.A. (Annapolis), M.A. (San Francisco), Ph.D. (Albuquerque), Associate Professor
  • C. Hutcherson, B.A. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Stanford), Assistant Professor
  • Y. Inbar, B.A. (Berkeley), Ph.D. (Cornell), Assistant Professor
  • M. Inzlicht, B.Sc. (McGill), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Brown), Professor
  • R. Ito, B.A. (Oxford), Ph.D. (Cambridge), Assistant Professor
  • S. Joordens, B.A. (New Brunswick), M.A., Ph.D. (Waterloo), Professor
  • J.M. Kennedy, B.Sc., M.Sc. (Belfast), Ph.D. (Cornell), University Professor Emeritus
  • A. Kukla, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (UCLA), Professor Emeritus
  • J.C. LeBoutillier, B.Sc., M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Associate Professor, Teaching Stream
  • A.C.H. Lee B.A. (Oxford), Ph.D. (Cambridge), Assistant Professor
  • A. Nestor, B.A. (Bucharest), M.Sc. (New Bulgarian), Ph.D. (Brown), Assistant Professor
  • M. Niemeier, M.A. (Hamburg), Ph.D. (Tubingen), Associate Professor
  • T.L. Petit, B.Sc., M.A. (Louisiana), Ph.D. (Florida), Professor Emeritus
  • A.C. Ruocco, B.Sc. (York), M.Sc., Ph.D., C.Psych. (Drexel), Associate Professor
  • M.A. Schmuckler, B.A. (SUNY-Binghamton), Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor
  • Z. Segal, B.A. (McGill), M.A. (Queens), Ph.D. (Queens), Professor
  • M.C. Smith, B.A. (Toronto), Ph.D. (MIT), Professor Emerita
  • R. Smyth, B.A. (Carleton), M.Sc. (Alberta), Ph.D. (Alberta), Associate Professor
  • S. Tran, B.A. (Oklahoma), M.S. (Texas A&M), Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor, Teaching Stream
  • A.A. Uliaszek, B.A. (Penn State), M.A., Ph.D. (Northwestern), Assistant Professor
  • K.K. Zakzanis, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., C.Psych. (York), Professor

Chair: G.S. Cree

Psychology - Associate Chair and Program Supervisor: Matthias Niemeier

Mental Health Studies and Co-op Programs - Associate Chair and Program Supervisor: Konstantine Zakzanis

Program Manager: Hanan Domloge
Undergraduate Advisor: Ainsley Lawson
Email: psychology-undergraduate@utsc.utoronto.ca
Co-op Contact: askcoop@utsc.utoronto.ca

Psychology is that branch of science which seeks to understand behaviour and mind. Why organisms - human and infrahuman - act as they do is one of the most compelling and longstanding questions in the history of human thought. Philosophers, artists, novelists, theologians and others have sought the answer through a variety of means. Psychology uses the methods of scientific enquiry to address the question.

The areas of interest encompassed by the discipline of psychology include: How humans learn, adapt, and remember; how they change over their lifetimes; how they are affected by the presence of others; how their behaviour relates to their physiological functions; how mental processes can exhibit pathologies and how these pathologies can be treated. Our course offerings in Psychology include all of these topics, covering how psychologists go about answering the important questions in each, and what we have learned about each.

The Specialist Program in Psychology focuses on normal thought, feelings and behaviour whereas the Specialist Program in Mental Health Studies focuses on abnormal psychological processes. The Specialist Program in Psychology is intended both for students with a strong interest in the science of psychology and for those who wish to pursue graduate work in psychology after the first degree. The Specialist in Mental Health Studies is intended for students with a strong interest in pathologies of the mind and in their treatment. Students considering graduate study should plan to include the PSYD98Y3 (thesis course) in their undergraduate Program.

Two co-operative programs are offered, the Specialist (Co operative) Program in Psychology and the Specialist (Co-operative) Program in Mental Health Studies. Admission to these programs which involve practical work experience is limited.

The Major Program in Psychology and the Major Program in Mental Health Studies are designed to introduce students to the main areas within each of these related disciplines. The Minor Program in Psychology is designed for students who are interested in a less intensive exposure to the field. Often, students wish to concentrate their studies in two areas, in which case a double Major Program combining psychology with another discipline is ideal. Programs in Mental Health Studies and Psychology cannot, however, be combined.
Students particularly interested in the relation of brain to behaviour should consider the Neuroscience Programs described earlier in this Calendar.

Admission to Psychology Programs
The Specialist and Major programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies have enrolment limits. Every year students will be admitted to the Specialist and Major Programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies. Entry into these programs after first year can be gained as follows:

  • Students may apply to the program after completing a minimum of 4.0 credits including 1 full credit in psychology.
  • Admission will require a final grade of 70% or higher in each of PSYA01H3 and PSYA02H3 for admission to the Specialist programs and 60% or higher in each of PSYA01H3 and PSYA02H3 for the Major programs.
  • Students in the Major who achieve a final grade of 70% or higher in each of two B-level psychology courses will be accepted for transfer into the Specialist program.

Application for admission will be made to the Registrar through ROSI, in April/May and July/August. Admission information for Co-op programs can be found under the relevant program descriptions below.

Planning your Program in Psychology
Students should be aware that the A, B, C, D course structure in Psychology dictates the sequence in which courses should be taken, but not the year of study in which a given course must be taken. That is, A, B, C, and D do not correspond to first, second, third and fourth year. For example, it is recommended that PSYB07H3 and PSYC08H3 be taken consecutively in the two terms of second year.

Courses in the Faculty of Arts and Science correspond to A-, B-, C- or D-level of study, with the exception of PSY450H1, PSY493H1, and PSY494H1, which will count at the C-level, not the D-level; all other 400-level courses count as D-level courses. A 300-level course, which is comparable to a C-level course, may not be used to satisfy a D-level program requirement, even if it is listed as an exclusion to a D-level course. Students are encouraged to plan carefully so that they will meet their educational objectives over the years of their degree. Discussions with the Undergraduate Advisor can be very valuable in this regard.

Program Exclusion
Programs in Mental Health Studies and Psychology cannot be combined.

First-Year Students in Psychology
PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3 are recommended in first year for students intending to pursue a Specialist or Major Program in Psychology or Mental Health Studies.

Courses in Neuroscience
Students interested in including Neuroscience courses in their Psychology or Mental Health Studies Program should consult the Neuroscience section for details.

Service Learning and Outreach (Previously known as Science Engagement)
For experiential learning through community outreach and classroom in-reach, please see the Teaching and Learning section of this Calendar.

Combined Degree Programs, Specialist programs in Mental Health Studies, Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Social Work

The Combined Degree Programs in Mental Health Studies (BSc) and MSW are ideal for students pursuing a career as a social worker. These accelerated programs provide a rich intellectual pathway for exceptional undergraduate students by providing access to social work research before the completion of the undergraduate degree, and offer students an opportunity to become equipped for evidence-informed social work practice, through a research course in Year 4 with a Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work (FIFSW) co-supervisor. The Combined Degree Programs allow well-qualified students to apply during their third year, and be considered, for admission to the FIFSW Master's program in Social Work.

Combined Degree Programs options are:

  • Mental Health Studies (Specialist), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Social Work
  • Mental Health Studies (Speciialist Co-op), Honours Bachelor of Science/ Master of Social Work

For more information, including Admission and Program requirements, see the Combined Degree Programs section of this Calendar.

Psychology Programs

SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN MENTAL HEALTH STUDIES (SCIENCE)

Program Requirements                                                                                                         

The program requires completion of 12.5 credits as follows, including at least 4.0 credits at the C- or D-level, of which at least 1.0 must be at the D-level:

  1. PSYA01H3 Introductory Psychology: Part I
    and
    PSYA02H3 Introductory Psychology: Part II
    (1.0 credit)
  2. Statistical Methods (1.0 credit)
    1. PSYB07H3 Data Analysis in Psychology
      and
    2. [PSYC08H3 Advanced Data Analysis in Psychology or PSYC09H3 Applied Multiple Regression in Psychology]
  3. Laboratory Methods (1.0 credit)
    1. PSYB01H3 Psychological Research Laboratory
      and
    2. PSYC37H3 Psychological Assessment
  4. PSYC02H3 Scientific Communication in Psychology
    (0.5 credit)
  5. PSYC85H3 History of Psychology
  6. PSYB30H3 Personality
    and
    PSYB32H3 Abnormal Psychology
    (1.0 credit)
  7. Students are required to take 2.0 credits from either the psycho-social grouping or the psycho-biological grouping listed below, as well as 1.0 credit from the other grouping (3.0 credits):
    1. Psycho-Social Grouping
      PSYB45H3 Behaviour Modification: Origins and Applications
      PSYC18H3 The Psychology of Emotion
      PSYC35H3 Advanced Personality Psychology
      PSYC36H3 Psychotherapy
      PSYC39H3 Psychology and the Law
    2. Psycho-Biological Grouping
      PSYB64H3 Physiological Psychology
      PSYB65H3 Human Brain & Behaviour
      PSYC31H3 Clinical Neuropsychology
      PSYC33H3 Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
      PSYC62H3 Drugs and the Brain
  8. Students are required to take 1.0 D-level credit, with at least 0.5 from the following list (1.0 credit)
    PSYD30H3 Current topics in Personality Psychology
    PSYD32H3 Personality Disorders
    PSYD33H3 Current topics in Abnormal Psychology
    PSYD35H3 Clinical Psychopharmacology
  9. Additional credits in Psychology (1.5 credits)
  10. Students must select 2.0 credits from the following courses:
    HLTB17H3 Conceptual Models of Health
    HLTB40H3 Health Policy and Health Systems
    HLTC05H3 Society, Health and Illness
    HLTC22H3 Health, Aging, and the Life Cycle
    HLTC23H3 Issues in Child Health and Development
    HLTC42H3 Emerging Health Issues and Policy Needs
    IDSB04H3 Introduction to International/Global Health
    IDSC11H3 Issues in Global and International Health
    LINB20H3 Sociolinguistics
    PHLA11H3 Introduction to Ethics
    PHLB07H3 Ethics
    PHLB09H3 Biomedical Ethics
    PHLB81H3 Theories of Mind
    SOCB22H3 Sociology of Gender
    SOCB49H3 Sociology of Family
    SOCB50H3 Deviance and Normality I
    (SOCB51H3) Deviance and Normality II
SPECIALIST (CO-OPERATIVE) PROGRAM IN MENTAL HEALTH STUDIES (SCIENCE)

The Program combines academic studies in the field of mental health with practical work experience. The work experience provided by the program enables students to explore career opportunities relevant to their studies in mental health. Completion of the program does not, however, represent a professional qualification in psychology, which requires further study at the graduate level. Work settings may also provide students with the opportunity to observe and assist psychologists engaged in clinical practice, hence providing a broader and more informed basis for the selection of a post graduate program appropriate to the student's talents and interests. Some work settings may provide the opportunity for clinical engagement under close supervision. For information on admissions, fees, work terms and standing in the Program, please see section 6B.5 (Co-operative Programs) in this Calendar.

Program Admission
Prospective Applicants: For direct admission from secondary school or for students who wish to transfer to U of T Scarborough from another U of T faculty or from another post secondary institution, see section 6B. 5 (Co-operative Programs) in this Calendar.

Current U of T Scarborough students
: Application procedures can be found at the Registrar's Office website at: www.utsc.utoronto.ca/subjectpost. The minimum qualifications for entry are 4.0 credits including PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3 plus a cumulative GPA of at least 2.75. Students who have completed 10.0 credits, or more, are not eligible to apply to the program. Students currently enrolled in the Specialist Co-op in Mental Health Studies, who have completed 10.0 credits, or more, are not eligible to transfer to the Specialist Co-op in Psychology, or vice-versa.

Program Requirements

Work Terms

The program requires eight four month terms of study and two four month work terms over a four year period. To be eligible for their first work term, students must have completed at least 10.0 credits, including PSYB01H3, PSYB07H3, PSYB32H3, PSYB65H3, PSYC02H3, PSYC08H3, and PSYC32H3. Students must also successfully complete Arts & Science Co-op Work Term Preparation Activities, which include multiple networking sessions, speaker panels and industry tours along with seminars covering resumes, cover letters, job interviews and work term expectations, prior to their first work term. Certain other courses specified below, are to be taken before the first work term.

To be eligible for their second work term, students must have completed at least 12.5 credits, including certain courses specified below, and have received satisfactory evaluation for their performance and for their report on their first work term.

Course Requirements
The program requires 12.5 credits as follows, including at least 4.0 credits at the C-level, of which at least 1.0 credit must be at the D-level:

  1. PSYA01H3 Introductory Psychology: Part I
    and
    PSYA02H3 Introductory Psychology: Part II
    (1.0 credit)
  2. Statistical Methods (1.0 credit)
    1. PSYB07H3 Data Analysis in Psychology*
      and
    2. [PSYC08H3 Advanced Data Analysis in Psychology or PSYC09H3 Applied Multiple Regression in Psychology]*
  3. Laboratory Methods (1.5 credits)
    1. PSYB01H3 Psychological Research Laboratory*
      and
    2. PSYC32H3 Clinical Neuropsychology Laboratory*
      and
    3. PSYC37H3 Psychological Assessment**
  4. PSYC02H3 Scientific Communication in Psychology*
    (0.5 credit)
  5. PSYC85H3 History of Psychology
  6. PSYB30H3 Personality
    and
    PSYB32H3 Abnormal Psychology*
    (1.0 credit)
  7. Students are required to take 2.0 credits from either the psycho-social grouping or the psycho-biological grouping listed below, as well as 1.0 credit from the other grouping (3.0 credits):
    1. Psycho-Social Grouping
      PSYB45H3 Behaviour Modification
      PSYC18H3 The Psychology of Emotion
      PSYC35H3 Advanced Personality Psychology
      PSYC36H3 Psychotherapy
      PSYC39H3 Psychology and the Law
    2. Psycho-Biological Grouping
      PSYB64H3 Physiological Psychology
      PSYB65H3 Human Brain & Behaviour*
      PSYC33H3 Neuropsychological Rehabilitation**
      PSYC62H3 Drugs and the Brain
  8. Students are required to take 1.0 D-level credit, with at least 0.5 credit from the following list:
    PSYD30H3 Current topics in Personality Psychology
    PSYD32H3 Personality Disorders
    PSYD33H3 Current topics in Abnormal Psychology
    PSYD35H3 Clinical Psychopharmacology
  9. Additional credits in Psychology (1.0 credits)
  10. Students must select 2.0 credits from the following courses:
    HLTB17H3 Conceptual Models of Health
    HLTB40H3 Health Policy and Health Systems
    HLTC05H3 Society, Health and Illness
    HLTC22H3 Health, Aging, and the Life Cycle
    HLTC23H3 Issues in Child Health and Development
    HLTC42H3 Emerging Health Issues and Policy Needs
    IDSB04H3 Introduction to International/Global Health
    IDSC11H3 Issues in Global and International Health
    LINB20H3 Sociolinguistics
    PHLA11H3 Introduction to Ethics
    PHLB07H3 Ethics
    PHLB09H3 Biomedical Ethics
    PHLB81H3 Theories of Mind
    SOCB22H3 Sociology of Gender
    SOCB49H3 Sociology of Family
    SOCB50H3 Deviance and Normality I
    (SOCB51H3) Deviance and Normality II

* These credits must be successfully completed before the first work term.
** These credits must be successfully completed before the second work term.

SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN PSYCHOLOGY (SCIENCE)

Program Requirements

The Program requires completion of 12.5 credits, including at least 4.0 credits at the C- or D-level, of which at least 1.0 credit must be at the D-level:

  1. PSYA01H3 Introductory Psychology: Part I
    and
    PSYA02H3 Introductory Psychology: Part II
    (1.0 credit)
  2. Statistical Methods (1.0 credit)
    1. PSYB07H3 Data Analysis in Psychology
      and
    2. [PSYC08H3 Advanced Data Analysis in Psychology or PSYC09H3 Applied Multiple Regression in Psychology]
  3. Laboratory Methods (1.0 credit)
    1. PSYB01H3 Psychological Research Laboratory
      and
    2. 0.5 credit from among the following:
      PSYC04H3 Brain Imaging Laboratory
      PSYC05H3 Human Movement Laboratory
      PSYC06H3 Psychophysiology Laboratory
      PSYC11H3 Social Psychology Laboratory
      PSYC26H3 Developmental Psychology Laboratory
      PSYC58H3 Cognitive Psychology Laboratory
      NROC63H3 Neuroscience Laboratory
  4. PSYC02H3 Scientific Communication in Psychology (0.5 credit)
  5. PSYC85H3 History of Psychology
  6. Credits at the B-level and C-level (5.0 credits)
    Students are required to take 3.0 credits at the B-level or C-level from one of the two content groups listed below and 2.0 credits from the other group:
    1. Social and Developmental (courses listed in the 10- and 20-series);
    2. Perception, Cognition and Physiology (courses listed in the 50- and 60-series)
  7. Credits at the D-level (1.0 credit)
    Students must take a 0.5 credit from each of the groupings listed below:
    1. Group One
      PSYD11H3 Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships
      PSYD12H3 Social Psychology of the Self
      PSYD14H3 Psychology of Morality
      PSYD15H3 Current Topics in Social Psychology
      PSYD16H3 Critical Analysis in Social Psychology
      PSYD18H3 Psychology of Gender
      PSYD20H3 Current Topics in Developmental Psychology
      PSYD22H3 Socialization Processes
    2. Group Two
      PSYD34H3 Human Intelligence
      PSYD50H3 Current Topics in Memory and Cognition
      PSYD51H3 Current Topics in Perception
      PSYD66H3 Current Topics in Human Brain and Behaviour
  8. Additional credits in Psychology (2.5 credits)
    Students must choose 2.5 further credits from any of the remaining courses in Psychology. In selecting the 2.5 credits, 1.0 credit must be at the C-level. Supervised study or thesis courses may be used to fulfill a maximum of 0.5 credit.
SPECIALIST (CO-OPERATIVE) PROGRAM IN PSYCHOLOGY (SCIENCE)

The Program combines academic studies in the field of psychology with practical work experience. The work experience provided by the program enables students to explore career opportunities relevant to their studies in psychology. Completion of the program does not, however, represent a professional qualification in psychology, which requires further study at the graduate level. Work settings may also provide students with the opportunity to observe psychologists interacting with other professionals, hence providing a broader and more informed basis for the selection of a post graduate program appropriate to the student's talents and interests. Some work settings will provide the opportunity for participation in basic or applied research. For information on admissions, fees, work terms and standing in the Program, please see section 6B.5 (Co operative Programs) in this Calendar.

Program Admission
Prospective Applicants: For direct admission from secondary school or for students who wish to transfer to U of T Scarborough from another U of T faculty or from another post secondary institution, see section 6B.5 (Co-operative Programs) in this Calendar.

Current U of T Scarborough students
: Application procedures can be found at the Registrar's Office website at: www.utsc.utoronto.ca/subjectpost. The minimum qualifications for entry are 4.0 credits including PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3 plus a cumulative GPA of at least 2.75. Students who have completed 10.0 credits, or more, are not eligible to apply to the program. Students currently enrolled in the Specialist Co-op in Psychology, who have completed 10.0 credits, or more, are not eligible to transfer to the Specialist Co-op in Mental Health Studies, or vice-versa.

Work Terms
The program requires eight four month terms of study and two four month work terms over a four year period. To be eligible for their first work term, students must have completed at least 10.0 credits, including PSYB01H3, PSYB07H3, PSYC02H3 and PSYC08H3. Students must also successfully complete Arts & Science Co-op Work Term Preparation Activities, which include multiple networking sessions, speaker panels and industry tours along with seminars covering resumes, cover letters, job interviews and work term expectations, prior to their first work term. Certain other courses specified below before the first work term is undertaken.

To be eligible for their second work term, students must have completed at least 12.5 credits, including certain courses specified below, and have received satisfactory evaluation for their performance and for their report on their first work term.

Course Requirements
The program requires the completion of 12.5 credits as specified for the Specialist Program in Psychology.
The program provides a theoretical and methodological foundation for the study of psychological processes relevant to social behaviour, life-span development, perception, memory, language and thought. Students can apply for work term employment in settings such as survey research firms and in government departments and other agencies involved in providing support to persons with disabilities, educational organizations, and research and development departments in the industry.

Program Requirements
The Program requires completion of 12.5 credits, including at least 4.0 credits at the C- or D-level, of which at 1.0 credit must be at the D-level:

  1. PSYA01H3 Introductory Psychology: Part I
    and
    PSYA02H3 Introductory Psychology: Part II
    (1.0 credit)
  2. Statistical Methods (1.0 credit)
    1. PSYB07H3 Data Analysis in Psychology*
      and
    2. [PSYC08H3 Advanced Data Analysis in Psychology or PSYC09H3 Applied Multiple Regression in Psychology]*
  3. Laboratory Methods (1.0 credit)
    1. PSYB01H3 Psychological Research Laboratory*
      and
    2. 0.5 credit from among the following:
      PSYC04H3 Brain Imaging Laboratory
      PSYC05H3 Human Movement Laboratory
      PSYC06H3 Psychophysiology Laboratory
      PSYC11H3 Social Psychology Laboratory
      PSYC26H3 Developmental Psychology Laboratory
      PSYC58H3 Cognitive Psychology Laboratory
      NROC63H3 Neuroscience Laboratory
  4. PSYC02H3 Scientific Communication in Psychology (0.5 credit)*
  5. PSYC85H3 History of Psychology
  6. Credits at the B-level and C-level (5.0 credits)
    Students are required to take 3.0 credits at the B-level or C-level from one of the two content groups listed below and 2.0 credits from the other group:
    1. Social and Developmental (courses listed in the 10- and 20-series);
    2. Perception, Cognition and Physiology (courses listed in the 50- and 60-series);
  7. Credits at the D-level (1.0 credit)
    Students must take 0.5 credit from each of the groupings listed below:
    1. Group One
      PSYD11H3 Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships
      PSYD12H3 Social Psychology of the Self
      PSYD14H3 Psychology of Morality
      PSYD15H3 Current Topics in Social Psychology
      PSYD16H3 Critical Analysis in Social Psychology
      PSYD18H3 Psychology of Gender
      PSYD20H3 Current Topics in Developmental Psychology
      PSYD22H3 Socialization Processes
    2. Group Two
      PSYD34H3 Human Intelligence
      PSYD50H3 Current Topics in Memory and Cognition
      PSYD51H3 Current Topics in Perception
      PSYD66H3 Current Topics in Human Brain and Behaviour
  8. Additional credits in Psychology (2.5 credits)
    Students must choose 2.5 further credits from any of the remaining courses in Psychology. In selecting the 2.0 credits, 1.0 credit must be at the C-level. Supervised study or thesis courses may be used to fulfill a maximum of 0.5 credit.

(*)  These credits must be successfully completed before the first work term.

MAJOR PROGRAM IN MENTAL HEALTH STUDIES (SCIENCE)

Program Requirements

The program requires 7.0 credits, of which at least 2.0 credits must be at the C- or D-level:

  1. PSYA01H3 Introductory Psychology: Part I
    and
    PSYA02H3 Introductory Psychology: Part II
    (1.0 credit)
  2. STAB22H3 Statistics I
    or
    STAB23H3 Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences
    or
    PSYB07H3 Data Analysis in Psychology
    (0.5 credit)
  3. Laboratory Methods (1.0 credit)
    [PSYB01H3 Psychological Research Laboratory or PSYB04H3 Foundations in Psychological Research]
    and
    PSYC37H3 Psychological Assessment
  4. PSYB30H3 Personality
    and
    PSYB32H3 Abnormal Psychology
    (1.0 credit)
  5. Students are required to take 1.0 credit from either the psycho-social grouping or the psycho-biological grouping listed below, as well as 0.5 credit from the other group (1.5 credits):
    1. Psycho-Social Grouping
      PSYB45H3 Behaviour Modification
      PSYC18H3 The Psychology of Emotion
      PSYC35H3 Advanced Personality Psychology
      PSYC36H3 Psychotherapy
      PSYC39H3 Psychology and the Law
    2. Psycho-Biological Grouping
      PSYB64H3 Physiological Psychology
      PSYB65H3 Human Brain & Behaviour
      PSYC31H3 Clinical Neuropsychology
      PSYC33H3 Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
      PSYC62H3 Drugs and the Brain
  6. Credits at the D-level (0.5 credit)
  7. Additional credits in Psychology (1.5 credits)
MAJOR PROGRAM IN PSYCHOLOGY (SCIENCE)

Program Requirements

The Program requires completion of 7.0 credits, of which at least 2.0 credits must be at the C- or D-level:

  1. PSYA01H3 Introductory Psychology: Part I
    and
    PSYA02H3 Introductory Psychology: Part II
    (1.0 credit)
  2. PSYB01H3 Psychological Research Laboratory
    or
    PSYB04H3 Foundations in Psychological Research
    (0.5 credit)
  3. STAB22H3 Statistics I (recommended)
    or
    STAB23H3 Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences
    or
    PSYB07H3 Data Analysis in Psychology
    (0.5 credit)
  4. Credits at the B-level and C-level (2.5 credits)
    Students are required to take 2.0 credits at the B-level or C-level from one of the two content groups listed below and 0.5 credit from the other group:
    1. Social and Developmental (courses listed in the 10- and 20-series);
    2. Perception, Cognition and Physiology (courses listed in the 50- and 60-series)
  5. Credits at the D-level (0.5 full credit)
    Students must choose one half credit from the D-level offerings in Psychology. Certain D-level NRO courses may be used to fulfill this requirement with the approval of the Supervisor of Studies.
  6. Additional credits in Psychology (2.0 credits)
    Students must choose 2.0 further credits from any of the remaining courses in Psychology. At least 1.0 credit from these must be at the C-level.
MINOR PROGRAM IN PSYCHOLOGY (SCIENCE)

Program Requirements
The Program requires completion of 4.0 credits, of which 1.0 credit must be at the C-level:

  1. PSYA01H3 Introductory Psychology: Part I
    and
    PSYA02H3 Introductory Psychology: Part II
    (1.0 credit)
  2. PSYB01H3 Psychological Research Laboratory
    or
    PSYB04H3 Foundations in Psychological Research
    (0.5 credit)
  3. STAB22H3 Statistics I
    or
    STAB23H3 Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences
    or
    PSYB07H3 Data Analysis in Psychology
    (0.5 credit)
  4. Students are required to select 0.5 credit at the B-level from each of the two content groups listed below (1.0 credit):
    1. Social, Developmental and Personality (courses listed in the 10-, 20- or 30-series);
    2. Learning, Perception, Cognition and Physiology (courses listed in the 40-, 50- or 60-series);
  5. 1.0 additional credit in Psychology at the C-level.

NOTE: students in the Minor in Psychology can register in no more than 1.0 full credit equivalent in psychology at the C-level.


Psychology Courses


PSYA01H3    Introductory Psychology: Part I

This course provides a general overview of topics including research techniques in psychology, evolutionary psychology, the biology of behaviour, learning and behaviour, sensation, perception, memory and consciousness. The most influential findings from each of these areas will be highlighted.

Exclusion: PSY100H, PSY100Y, (PSY101H)
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYA02H3    Introductory Psychology: Part II

This course provides a general overview of topics including language, intelligence, development, motivation and emotion, personality, social psychology, stress, mental disorders and treatments of mental disorders. The most influential findings from each of these areas will be highlighted.

Exclusion: PSY100H, PSY100Y, (PSY102H)
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYB01H3    Psychological Research Laboratory

This course surveys the basic research techniques and designs used in the diverse field of psychological research, both in experimental and non-experimental areas. The topics range from the general principles of scientific research to concrete design issues, from sampling techniques to the typical problems faced when interpreting data.

Prerequisite: PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYB03H3    Introduction to Computers in Psychological Research

The course will provide introductory knowledge and hands-on training in computer-based implementations of experimental design, data processing and result interpretation in psychology. The course covers implementations of experimental testing paradigms, computational explorations of empirical data structure and result visualization with the aid of specific programming tools (e.g., Matlab).

Prerequisite: PSYA01H3 and PSYA02H3
Corequisite: PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3
Enrolment Limits: 70
Breadth Requirement: Quantitative Reasoning
NOTE: Priority will be given to Specialist, Specialist Co-op, and Major students in Psychology, Mental Health Studies and Neuroscience. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.

PSYB04H3    Foundations in Psychological Research

A practical introduction to research methods in psychology. Students will learn experimental designs commonly used in psychological research, how to assess whether a design has been applied correctly or incorrectly, and whether the conclusions drawn from the data are warranted. This course is designed for students who need to be able to evaluate and critique research, rather than conduct novel research.

Prerequisite: PSYA01H3 and PSYA02H3
Exclusion: PSYB01H3
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYB07H3    Data Analysis in Psychology

This course focuses on the fundamentals of the theory and the application of statistical procedures used in research in the field of psychology. Topics will range from descriptive statistics to simple tests of significance, such as Chi-Square, t-tests, and one-way Analysis-of-Variance. A working knowledge of algebra is assumed. Students in the Specialist programs in Psychology, Psycholinguistics or Neuroscience will be given priority for this course.

Exclusion: ANTC35H3, MGEB11H3/(ECMB11H3), MGEB12H3/(ECMB12H3), PSY201H, (SOCB06H3), STAB22H3, STAB52H3, STA220H, STA221H, STA250H, STA257H
Breadth Requirement: Quantitative Reasoning

PSYB10H3    Introduction to Social Psychology

Surveys a wide range of phenomena relating to social behaviour.
Social Psychology is the study of how feelings, thoughts, and behaviour are influenced by the presence of others. The course is designed to explore social behaviour and to present theory and research that foster its understanding.

Prerequisite: PSYA01H3 and PSYA02H3
Exclusion: PSY220H
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYB20H3    Introduction to Developmental Psychology

Developmental processes during infancy and childhood.
This course presents students with a broad and integrative overview of child development. Major theories and research findings will be discussed in order to understand how the child changes physically, socially, emotionally, and cognitively with age. Topics are organized chronologically beginning with prenatal development and continuing through selected issues in adolescence and life-span development.

Prerequisite: PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3
Exclusion: PSYB21H3, PSY210H
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYB21H3    Introduction to Developmental Psychology: Focus on Education

Child and adolescent development in education. This course presents students with a broad and integrative overview of child development as it pertains to education. Topics are organized chronologically beginning with prenatal development and continuing through selected issues in adolescence and life-span development. In addition to the lecture component, students will complete a field placement in which they observe children's behaviour and think critically about development. (Note: course includes 12-20 hours of field placements)

Prerequisite: Enrolment in CTEP
Exclusion: CTE100H, PSYB20H3, PSY210H
Recommended Preparation: PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYB30H3    Personality

This course is intended to introduce students to the scientific study of the whole person in biological, social, and cultural contexts. The ideas of classical personality theorists will be discussed in reference to findings from contemporary personality research.

Prerequisite: PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3
Exclusion: PSY230H
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYB32H3    Abnormal Psychology

The study of abnormal psychology is a search for why people behave, think, and feel in unexpected, sometimes bizarre, and typically self-defeating ways. Much less is known than we would like. However, this course will focus on the ways in which psychopathologists have been trying to learn the causes of abnormal behaviour and what they know about preventing and alleviating it.

Prerequisite: PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3
Exclusion: PSY240H, PSY340H
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYB45H3    Behaviour Modification: Origins and Applications

A survey of attempts to regulate abnormal human behaviour.
Basic principles of behavioural change including reinforcement, extinction, punishment and stimulus control; operant and respondent conditioning procedures; research strategies. Other topics include behavioural contracting, cognitive-behaviour therapy, rational-emotive therapy, and systematic desensitization; treatment of phobias; treatment of alcohol and drug abuse.

Prerequisite: PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3
Exclusion: PSY260H
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYB51H3    Perception and Cognition

Theory and research on perception and cognition, including visual, auditory and tactile perception, representation, and communication. Topics include cognition and perception in the handicapped and normal perceiver; perceptual illusion, noise, perspective, shadow patterns and motion, possible and impossible scenes, human and computer scene-analysis, ambiguity in perception, outline representation. The research is on adults and children, and different species. Demonstrations and exercises form part of the course work.

Prerequisite: PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3
Exclusion: NROC64H3, PSY280H
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYB57H3    Memory and Cognition

Discussion of experiments and theories in human memory and cognition. This course provides an analysis of the research on encoding, storage and retrieval of information in human memory. Also surveyed are the related topics of attention, thinking, and problem solving, and their role in a general model of information processing.

Prerequisite: PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3
Exclusion: PSY270H
Recommended Preparation: PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3 or their equivalent
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYB64H3    An Introduction to Physiological Psychology

A survey of the biological mechanisms underlying fundamental psychological processes. Topics include the biological basis of motivated behaviour (e.g., emotional, ingestive, sexual, and reproductive behaviours; sleep and arousal), sensory processes and attention, learning and memory, and language.

Prerequisite: PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3
Exclusion: NROC61H3, PSY290H
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYB65H3    Human Brain and Behaviour

The neurological basis of human behaviour: an introduction to human neuro-psychology. Hemispheric specialization, diseases of the central nervous system, behavioural consequences of damage to each of the cortical lobes, speech disorders, psychopharmacology and the biological basis of psychiatric disorders will be covered.

Prerequisite: PSYA01H3 & PSYA02H3
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC02H3    Scientific Communication in Psychology

How we communicate in psychology and why. The differences between scientific and non-scientific approaches to behaviour and their implications for communication are discussed. The focus is on improving the student's ability to obtain and organize information and to communicate it clearly and critically, using the conventions of the discipline.

Prerequisite: PSYB01H3 & [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3]
Enrolment Limits: Limited to students in the Specialist Programs in Psychology and in Mental Health Studies.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC03H3    Computers in Psychological Research: Advanced Topics

The course will provide advanced knowledge and hands-on training in computer-based implementations of experimental design, data processing and result interpretation in psychology. The course covers implementations of experimental testing paradigms, computational explorations of empirical data structure, and result visualization with the aid of specific programming tools (e.g., Matlab).

Prerequisite: [PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3] and PSYB03H3
Enrolment Limits: 35
Breadth Requirement: Quantitative Reasoning
NOTE: Priority will be given to Specialist, Specialist Co-op, and Major students in Psychology, Mental Health Studies and Neuroscience. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.

PSYC04H3    Brain Imaging Laboratory

The course introduces brain imaging techniques, focusing on techniques such as high-density electroencephalography (EEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), together with magnet-resonance-imaging-based neuronavigation. Furthermore, the course will introduce eye movement recordings as a behavioural measure often co-registered in imaging studies. Students will learn core principles of experimental designs, data analysis and interpretation in a hands-on manner.

Prerequisite: PSYB01H3 and [PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3]
Enrolment Limits: 35; Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op programs in Psychology. Students in any Mental Health Studies program and the Major in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC05H3    Human Movement Laboratory

In this course students will be introduced to the study of human movement across a range of topics (e.g., eye-movements, balance, and walking), and will have the opportunity to collect and analyze human movement data. Additional topics include basic aspects of experimental designs, data analysis and interpretation of such data.

Prerequisite: PSYB01H3 and [PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3]
Enrolment Limits: 35; Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op programs in Psychology. Students in any Mental Health Studies program and the Major in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC06H3    Psychophysiology Laboratory

This course will provide students with an introduction to physiological processes that are related to psychological processes. Students will gain a theoretical background in psychophysiology as well as read key empirical papers related to the psychological correlates of each physiological system. This course will be a primary methods course for psychology specialists, such that students will acquire advanced skills involved in the acquisition of psychophysiological data and become well-versed in appropriate psychophysiological theory and inference. 

Prerequisite: PSYB01H3 and [PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3] and PSYC02H3
Enrolment Limits: 35; Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op programs in Psychology. Students in any Mental Health Studies program and the Major in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC08H3    Advanced Data Analysis in Psychology

This course is a continuation of PSYB07H3. The primary focus of this course is on the understanding of Analysis-of-Variance and its application to various research designs. Examples will include a priori and post hoc tests. Finally, there will be an introduction to multiple regression, including discussions of design issues and interpretation problems.

Prerequisite: [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3] and one additional B-level half-credit in Psychology
Exclusion: (STAC52H3), PSY202H
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology, Mental Health Studies, Neuroscience and Paramedicine. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Quantitative Reasoning

PSYC09H3    Applied Multiple Regression in Psychology

An introduction to multiple regression and its applications in psychological research. The course covers the data analysis process from data collection to interpretation: how to deal with missing data, the testing of assumptions, addressing problem of multicolinearity, significance testing, and deciding on the most appropriate model. Several illustrative data sets will be explored in detail. The course contains a brief introduction to factor analysis. The goal is to provide the students with the skills and understanding to conduct and interpret data analysis in non-experimental areas of psychology.

Prerequisite: [PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3] and an additional 0.5 credit at the B-level in Psychology
Enrolment Limits: 90
Breadth Requirement: Quantitative Reasoning
NOTE: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology, Mental Health Studies, and Neuroscience. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.

PSYC11H3    Social Psychology Laboratory

Introduces conceptual and practical issues concerning research in social psychology, and provides experience with several different types of research.
This course is designed to consider in depth various research approaches used in social psychology (such as attitude questionnaires, observational methods for studying ongoing social interaction). Discussion and laboratory work.

Prerequisite: PSYB01H3 and [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3] and PSYB10H3
Exclusion: PSY329H
Enrolment Limits: 35; Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op programs in Psychology. Students in any Mental Health Studies program and the Major in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYC12H3    The Psychology of Prejudice

A detailed examination of selected social psychological topics introduced in PSYB10H3. This course examines the nature of attitudes, stereotypes and prejudice, including their development, persistence, and automaticity. It also explores the impact of stereotypes on their targets, including how stereotypes are perceived and how they affect performance, attributions, and coping.

Prerequisite: [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3] and PSYB10H3 plus one additional B-level half credit in PSY
Exclusion: PSY322H
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYC13H3    Social Cognition: Understanding Ourselves and Others

A comprehensive survey of how cognitive processes (e.g., perception, memory, judgment) influence social behaviour. Topics include the construction of knowledge about self and others, attitude formation and change, influences of automatic and controlled processing, biases in judgment and choice, interactions between thought and emotion, and neural specializations for social cognition.

Prerequisite: [PSYB10H3 or PSYB57H3] and [PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3]
Exclusion: PSY326H, PSY473H, PSY417H
Enrolment Limits: 100
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences
NOTE: Priority will be given to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op, and Major programs in Psychology, Mental Health Studies and Neuroscience. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.

PSYC14H3    Cross-Cultural Social Psychology

A survey of the role of culture in social thought and behaviour. The focus is on research and theory that illustrate ways in which culture influences behaviour and cognition about the self and others, emotion and motivation. Differences in individualism and collectivism, independence and interdependence as well as other important orientations that differ between cultures will be discussed. Social identity and its impact on acculturation in the context of immigration will also be explored.

Prerequisite: [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3] and PSYB10H3 plus one additional B-level half-credit in PSY
Exclusion: PSY321H
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYC18H3    The Psychology of Emotion

Emotion is examined in everyday life and in relation to the arts. The focus of this course is on a contrast between action and experience oriented approaches to emotion. An effort is made to synthesize the many theories of emotion coming from psychoanalysis, functionalism, behaviourism, social constructionism, and phenomenology.

Prerequisite: PSYB10H3
Exclusion: PSY331H, (PSY394H), PSY494H
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYC21H3    Advanced Developmental Psychology

An examination of selected issues pertaining to adult development and aging.
Examples of topics which may be considered: adaptation to parenthood, work-related functioning, continuity versus change in adulthood.

Prerequisite: PSYB20H3 and one additional B-level half-credit in PSY
Exclusion: PSY313H, PSY311H
Recommended Preparation: PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3 or their equivalent
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies, and the Specialists in Paramedicine and Psycholinguistics. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYC23H3    Developmental Psychobiology

A review of the interplay of psychosocial and biological processes in the development of stress and emotion regulation. Theory and research on infant attachment, mutual regulation, gender differences in emotionality, neurobiology of the parent-infant relationship, and the impact of socialization and parenting on the development of infant stress and emotion.

Prerequisite: PSYB20H3
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC26H3    Developmental Psychology Laboratory

This course introduces conceptual and practical issues concerning research in developmental psychology.
Developmental psychology focuses on the process of change within and across different phases of the life-span. Reflecting the broad range of topics in this area, there are diverse research methods, including techniques for studying infant behaviour as well as procedures for studying development in children, adolescents, and adults. This course will cover a representative sample of some of these approaches.

Prerequisite: PSYB01H3 and [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3] and PSYB20H3
Exclusion: PSY319H
Enrolment Limits: 24; Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op programs in Psychology. Students in any Mental Health Studies program and the Major in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYC31H3    Clinical Neuropsychology

Clinical neuropsychology is an applied science concerned with the behavioural expression of brain dysfunction. In this course we will first examine the brain and localization of neuropsychological function. We will then explore the science and practice of clinical neuro-psychology where tests measuring different neuropsychological domains (e.g., memory, attention and so on) are employed in patient populations to infer brain dysfunction. Students in the Specialist (Co-operative) Program in Mental Health Studies should enrol in PSYC32H3, not in this course.

Prerequisite: PSYB01H3 and [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3] and PSYB32H3 and PSYB65H3
Exclusion: PSYC32H3, (PSY393H)
Enrolment Limits: 75; Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology, Mental Health Studies and Neuroscience. Students in the Specialist program in Integrative Biology and the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC32H3    Clinical Neuropsychology Laboratory

The applied science concerned with the behavioural expression of brain dysfunction for students in the Specialist (Co-op) program in Mental Health Studies.  Lecture and demonstration material will be as described for PSYC31H3, Clinical Neuropsychology, but students will also complete a laboratory component. The laboratory will afford the student the opportunity for hands-on experience with a number of neuropsychological measures and will emphasize the learning of specific test administration and interpretation.

Prerequisite: PSYB01H3 and [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3] and PSYB32H3 and PSYB65H3
Exclusion: PSYC31H3
Enrolment Limits: Enrolment is limited to students in the Specialist (Co-operative) Program in Mental Health Studies.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC33H3    Neuropsychological Rehabilitation

An examination of the therapeutic methods used to improve the capacity of a brain damaged individual to process and use incoming information, enhancing functioning in everyday life. Students will be introduced to methods that aim to restore cognitive function by compensatory techniques. Neuropsychological rehabilitation problems caused by deficits in attention, visual processing, language, memory, reasoning/problem solving, and executive functioning will be stressed. Lectures and demonstrations. Students in the Specialist (Co-operative) Program in Mental Health Studies will have priority for entry to the course.

Prerequisite: [PSYC31H3 or PSYC32H3] & PSYB57H3
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC35H3    Advanced Personality Psychology

This course is intended to advance students' understanding of contemporary personality theory and research. Emerging challenges and controversies in the areas of personality structure, dynamics, and development will be discussed.

Prerequisite: [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3] and PSYB30H3 plus one additional B-level half-credit in PSY
Exclusion: PSY337H
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYC36H3    Psychotherapy

This course will provide students with an introduction to prominent behavioural change theories (i.e. psychodynamic, cognitive/behavioural, humanist/existential) as well as empirical evidence on their efficacy. The role of the therapist, the patient and the processes involved in psychotherapy in producing positive outcomes will be explored.

Prerequisite: PSYB32H3
Exclusion: PSY343H
Enrolment Limits: Limited to students in the Mental Health Studies programs.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYC37H3    Psychological Assessment

This course deals with conceptual issues and practical problems of identification, assessment, and treatment of mental disorders and their psychological symptomatology. Students have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the psychological tests and the normative data used in mental health assessments. Lectures and demonstrations on test administration and interpretation will be provided.

Prerequisite: PSYB32H3
Exclusion: PSY330H
Enrolment Limits: Limited to students in the Mental Health Studies programs.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYC39H3    Psychology and the Law

This course focuses on the application of psychology to the law, particularly criminal law including cognitive, neuropsychological and personality applications to fitness to stand trial, criminal responsibility, risk for violent and sexual recidivism and civil forensic psychology.

Prerequisite: PSYB32H3
Exclusion: (PSYC53H3), PSY328H, PSY344H
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYC50H3    Higher-Level Cognition

This course examines advanced cognitive functions through a cognitive psychology lens. Topics covered include: thinking, reasoning, decision-making, problem-solving, creativity, and consciousness.

Prerequisite: PSYB57H3 and [PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3 or STAB23H3]
Enrolment Limits: 100
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences
NOTE: Priority will be given to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted as space permits.

PSYC51H3    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision

This course will provide an in-depth examination of research in the field of visual cognitive neuroscience. Topics will include the visual perception of object features (shape, colour, texture), the perception of high-level categories (objects, faces, bodies, scenes), visual attention, and comparisons between the human and monkey visual systems.

Prerequisite: PSYB51H3 or PSYB57H3 or PSYB65H3
Exclusion: PSY380H
Enrolment Limits: 75; Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op, and Major programs in Psychology, Mental Health Studies and Neuroscience. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC52H3    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Attention

This course is about understanding how the human brain collects information from the environment so as to perceive it and to interact with it. The first section of the course will look into the neural and cognitive mechanisms that perceptual systems use to extract important information from the environment. Section two will focus on how attention prioritizes information for action. Additional topics concern daily life applications of attentional research.

Prerequisite: [PSYB51H3 or PSYB57H3] and [PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3]

Exclusion: PSY475H
Enrolment Limits: 100
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences
NOTE: Priority will be given to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology, Mental Health Studies and Neuroscience. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.

PSYC54H3    Cognition and Representation

Recent research on the psychology of representation, in pictures, words, metaphors, analogies and symbols.
Topics will include developmental and cross-cultural research on children's drawing, the perception of pictures by the sighted, and blind people identifying raised pictures. It will also include studies on children and adults using literal and non-literal representation, including metaphors, similes, and analogies. It will include cross-cultural research on forms used as symbols, and studies on children and machines using symbols. Teaching method will be lectures and demonstrations.

Prerequisite: [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3] and a PSYB20-series or a PSYB50-series half-credit
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC55H3    Cognitive Neuroscience

The goal of this course is to present and analyze current methods, findings and theories relating brain function to cognitive processes such as perception, action, attention, memory, learning, and problem-solving. Recently developed research methods of functional neuro-imaging (including PET, MEG, and functional MRI) will be described along with the important research findings that they have generated.

Prerequisite: PSYB57H3 and PSYB65H3
Exclusion: (PSY393), PSY493H
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC56H3    Music Cognition

Studies the perceptual and cognitive processing involved in musical perception and performance.
This class acquaints students with the basic concepts and issues involved in the understanding of musical passages. Topics will include discussion of the physical and psychological dimensions of sound, elementary music theory, pitch perception and melodic organization, the perception of rhythm and time, musical memory, musical performance, and emotion and meaning in music.

Prerequisite: [PSYA01H3 and PSYA02H3] and [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3] and a PSYB50-series half-credit
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology and Mental Health Studies. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC57H3    Cognitive Neuroscience of Decision Making

This course will introduce students to current understanding, and ongoing debates, about how the brain makes both simple and complex decisions. Findings from single-cell neurophysiology, functional neuroimaging, and computational modeling will be used to illuminate fundamental aspects of choice, including reward prediction, value representation, action selection, and self-control.

Prerequisite: [PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3] and PSYB65H3
Recommended Preparation: PSYB03H3
Enrolment Limits: 100
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences
NOTE: Priority will be given to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology, Mental Health Studies and Neuroscience. Students in the Minor in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.

PSYC58H3    Cognitive Psychology Laboratory

This course introduces conceptual and practical issues concerning research in cognitive psychology.
Students will be introduced to current research methods through a series of practical exercises conducted on computers. By the end of the course, students will be able to program experiments, manipulate data files, and conduct basic data analyses.

Prerequisite: PSYB01H3 and [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3] and [PSYB51H3 or PSYB57H3]
Exclusion: PSY379H
Recommended Preparation: PSYC08H3
Enrolment Limits: 35; Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op programs in Psychology. Students in any Mental Health Studies program and the Major in Psychology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC59H3    Cognitive Neuroscience of Language

This course provides an overview of the cognitive and neural processes and representations that underlie language abilities. Core topics include first language acquisition, second language acquisition and bilingualism, speech comprehension, and reading. Insights into these different abilities will be provided from research using behavioural, neuroimaging, computational, and neuropsychological techniques.

Prerequisite: PSYB65H3 and [PSYB51H3 or PSYB57H3] and [PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3 or STAB23H3]
Enrolment Limits: 100
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences
NOTE: Priority will be given to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology, Mental Health Studies and Neuroscience. Students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op program in Psycholinguistics and the Minor in Psychology will be admitted as space permits.

PSYC62H3    Drugs and the Brain

An examination of behavioural and neurobiological mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of drug dependence.
Topics will include principles of behavioural pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, neurobiological mechanisms of drug action, and psychotropic drug classification. In addition, concepts of physical and psychological dependence, tolerance, sensitization, and reinforcement and aversion will also be covered.

Prerequisite: [PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3] and [at least one of PSYB64H3, PSYB65H3 or NROB60H3] and [one additional B-level or C-level half credit in PSY or NRO]
Exclusion: PSY396H, PCL475Y
Enrolment Limits: Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op and Major programs in Psychology, Mental Health Studies, and Neuroscience. Students in the Specialist program in Integrative Biology will be admitted if space permits.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC68H3    Diseases of the Brain and Mind

This course surveys the principal methods used to diagnose, investigate and treat a range of neurological diseases from a clinical perspective. Taught by the faculty of the brain sciences research program at Sunnybrook Research Institute, this course provides a conceptual and practical appreciation of modern and traditional neuroscience techniques.

Prerequisite: PSYB65H3 & PSYC62H3 & [one additional C-level half credit in PSY or NRO] & [cumulative GPA of at least 3.0]
Enrolment Limits: 50; Restricted to students in the Specialist/Specialist Co-op, and Major programs in Psychology, Mental Health Studies and Neuroscience.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYC85H3    History of Psychology

A survey of developments in Western philosophy and science which influenced the emergence of modern psychology in the second half of the Nineteenth Century. Three basic problems are considered: mind-body, epistemology (science of knowledge), and behaviour/motivation/ethics. We begin with the ancient Greek philosophers, and then consider the contributions of European scholars from the Fifteenth through Nineteenth Centuries. Twentieth Century schools are discussed including: psychoanalysis, functionalism, structuralism, gestalt, behaviourism, and phenomenology.
This course is restricted to 3rd and 4th year students in Specialist Programs in Psychology, Mental Health Studies & Psycholinguistics.

Prerequisite: Two B-level half-credits in Psychology or permission of the instructor
Exclusion: PSY450H, (PSY300H)
Recommended Preparation: PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3 or their equivalent
Breadth Requirement: History, Philosophy & Cultural Studies

PSYC90H3    Supervised Study in Psychology

An intensive research project intended to provide laboratory/field experience in data collection and analysis. The project must be completed over 2 consecutive terms.
These courses provide an opportunity to engage in research in an area after completing basic coverage in regularly scheduled courses. The student must demonstrate a background adequate for the project proposed and should present a clear rationale to prospective supervisors. Regular consultation with the supervisor is necessary, and extensive data collection and analysis will be required. Such a project will culminate in a written research report.
Students must first find a supervisor before the start of the academic term in which the project will be initiated. They must then obtain a permission form from the Department of Psychology's website (www.utsc.utoronto.ca/psych/undergraduates) that is to be completed and signed by the intended supervisor, and returned to the Psychology Office. At that time, the student will be provided with an outline of the schedule and general requirements for the course, including the structure of the required log-book.
Students seeking supervision off campus are further advised to check the appropriateness of the proposed advisor with the Program Supervisor. If the proposed supervisor is not appointed to the Psychology faculty at UTSC then a secondary advisor, that is appointed at UTSC, will be required.

Prerequisite: 3.0 full credits in Psychology and permission of the proposed supervisor. (Note: Normally students need a cumulative GPA of at least 2.7 for permission to be granted.)
Exclusion: COGC91H3, NROC90H3, PSY303H, PSY304H

PSYC93H3    Supervised Study in Psychology

An intensive research project intended to provide laboratory/field experience in data collection and analysis. The project must be completed over 2 consecutive terms.
These courses provide an opportunity to engage in research in an area after completing basic coverage in regularly scheduled courses. The student must demonstrate a background adequate for the project proposed and should present a clear rationale to prospective supervisors. Regular consultation with the supervisor is necessary, and extensive data collection and analysis will be required. Such a project will culminate in a written research report.
Students must first find a supervisor before the start of the academic term in which the project will be initiated. They must then obtain a permission form from the Department of Psychology's website (www.utsc.utoronto.ca/psych/undergraduates) that is to be completed and signed by the intended supervisor, and returned to the Psychology Office. At that time, the student will be provided with an outline of the schedule and general requirements for the course, including the structure of the required log-book.
Students seeking supervision off campus are further advised to check the appropriateness of the proposed advisor with the Program Supervisor. If the proposed supervisor is not appointed to the Psychology faculty at UTSC then a secondary advisor, that is appointed at UTSC, will be required. 

Prerequisite: 3.0 full credits in Psychology and permission of the proposed supervisor. (Note: Normally students need a cumulative GPA of at least 2.7 for permission to be granted.)
Exclusion: COGC92H3, NROC93H3, PSY303H, PSY304H

PSYD11H3    Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships

This course focuses on social psychological theory and research pertaining to close interpersonal relationships. The course will cover topics including perceptions of and interactions within close relationships, development and maintenance of relationships, and relationship conflict and dissolution.

Prerequisite: PSYB10H3 & [PSYC12H3 or PSYC14H3]
Exclusion: PSY420H, PSY424H, (PSY324), PSYD15H3 if taken in Fall 2010, Winter 2011, or Summer 2011.
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYD12H3    Social Psychology of the Self

This seminar explores the topic of the self from an experimental social-psychological perspective, including an in depth analysis of the fundamental processes of the “hyphenated self:” self-knowledge, self-esteem, self-regulation, for just a few examples. This course is designed to not only introduce students to much of the important theory and research in the social psychology of the self, but also to develop critical thinking skills.

Prerequisite: PSYB10H3 & [PSYC12H3 or PSYC14H3]
Exclusion: PSY326H, PSY420H
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYD14H3    Psychology of Morality

This course provides an in-depth introduction to the field of moral psychology. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in the science of human morality; the goal of this course is to offer an introduction to the research in this field. The course will incorporate perspectives from a variety of disciplines including philosophy, animal behaviour, neuroscience, economics, and almost every area of scientific psychology (social psychology, developmental psychology, evolutionary psychology, and cognitive psychology). By the end of the course students will be well versed in the primary issues and debates involved in the scientific study of morality.

Prerequisite: PSYB10H3 and [PSYC12H3 or PSYC13H3 or PSYC14H3]
Exclusion: PSYD15H3 (if taken in Fall 2015)
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYD15H3    Current Topics in Social Psychology

An intensive examination of selected issues and research problems in social psychology.

Prerequisite: PSYB10H3 & [PSYC12H3 or PSYC14H3]
Exclusion: PSY326H, PSY420H
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYD16H3    Critical Analysis in Social Psychology

The development of social psychology is examined both as a discipline (its phenomena, theory, and methods) and as a profession. The Natural and Human Science approaches to phenomena are contrasted. Students are taught to observe the lived-world, choose a social phenomenon of interest to them, and then interview people who describe episodes from their lives in which these phenomena occurred. The students interpret these episodes and develop theories to account for their phenomena before searching for scholarly research on the topic.

Prerequisite: PSYC11H3 or PSYC12H3 or [PSYB10H3 plus one C-level half-credit in PSY]
Exclusion: PSY420H
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYD17H3    Social Neuroscience

This course provides an overview of the emerging field of social neuroscience. It explores how integrating theory and methods from cognitive psychology, physiology, and neuroscience can be used to address fundamental questions in social psychology and, ultimately, broaden our understanding of mind, brain, and behaviour in a social world.

Prerequisite: PSYC12H3 & [PSYB64H3 or PSYB65H3]
Exclusion: PSY473H, (PSY373H)
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYD18H3    Psychology of Gender

This course focuses on theory and research pertaining to gender and gender roles. The social psychological and social-developmental research literature concerning gender differences will be critically examined. Other topics also will be considered, such as gender-role socialization.

Prerequisite: PSYB10H3 plus two C-level half-credit in PSY
Exclusion: PSY323H
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYD20H3    Current Topics in Developmental Psychology

An intensive examination of selected issues and research problems in developmental psychology.
The specific content will vary from year to year with the interests of both instructor and students. Lectures, discussions, and oral presentations by students.

Prerequisite: PSYC21H3 or PLIC24H3 or [PSYB20H3 plus one C-level half-credit in PSY]
Exclusion: PSY410H
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYD22H3    Socialization Processes

The processes by which an individual becomes a member of a particular social system (or systems). The course examines both the content of socialization (e.g., development of specific social behaviours) and the context in which it occurs (e.g., family, peer group, etc.). Material will be drawn from both social and developmental psychology.

Prerequisite: PSYB10H3 & PSYB20H3 plus one C-level half-credit in PSY
Exclusion: PSY311H, PSY410H
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYD30H3    Current Topics in Personality Psychology

An intensive examination of selected issues and research problems in personality psychology. The specific content will vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: PSYB30H3 and PSYC35H3
Exclusion: PSY430H
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYD31H3    Cultural-Clinical Psychology

This course provides an in-depth introduction to the field of cultural-clinical psychology. We examine theoretical and empirical advances in understanding the complex interplay between culture and mental health, focusing on implications for the study and treatment of psychopathology. Topics include cultural variations in the experience and expression of mental illness.

Prerequisite: PSYB32H3 and [an additional 0.5 credit at the C-level PSY]
Exclusion: PSYD33H3 (if taken in Fall 2013/2014/2015 or Summer 2014/2015)
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYD32H3    Personality Disorders

This course reviews the latest research on the causes, longitudinal development, assessment, and treatment of personality disorders. Students will learn the history of personality disorders and approaches to conceptualizing personality pathology. Topics covered include “schizophrenia-spectrum” personality disorders, biological approaches to psychopathy, and dialectical behaviour therapy for borderline personality disorder.

Prerequisite: PSYB30H3 & PSYB32H3 plus 0.5 credit at the C-level in PSY
Exclusion: PSY430H
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYD33H3    Current Topics in Abnormal Psychology

An intensive examination of selected issues and research problems in abnormal psychology. The specific content will vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: PSYB32H3 plus one C-level half-credit in PSY
Exclusion: PSY440H
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Social & Behavioural Sciences

PSYD34H3    Human Intelligence

Part I of this course reviews the classical theories as well as past research strategies and findings in the field of human intelligence. Part II examines current work in the area. Part III critically considers the concept of heritability, how it is estimated, and its application to the investigation of individual and group differences on IQ tests.

Prerequisite: PSYB01H3 and [PSYB07H3 or (SOCB06H3) or STAB22H3]
Recommended Preparation: PSYC08H3
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYD35H3    Clinical Psychopharmacology

This course reviews the psychopharmacological strategies used for addressing a variety of mental health conditions including anxiety, depression, psychosis, impulsivity, and dementia. It will also address the effects of psychotropic drugs on patients or clients referred to mental health professionals for intellectual, neuropsychological and personality testing. Limitations of pharmacotherapy and its combinations with psychotherapy will be discussed.

Prerequisite: PSYB65H3 & PSYC62H3
Enrolment Limits: This course is restricted to students in the Mental Health Studies programs.
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYD37H3    Social Context of Mental Health and Illness

This course is an opportunity to explore how social practices and ideas contribute to the ways in which society, families and individuals are affected by mental health and mental illness.

Prerequisite: 10.0 credits completed and enrolment in the Combined BSc in Mental Health Studies/Masters of Social Work or Specialist/Specialist-Co-op programs in Mental Health Studies
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYD50H3    Current Topics in Memory and Cognition

An intensive examination of selected topics. The specific content will vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: PSYB57H3 plus one C-level half-credit in PSY
Exclusion: PSY470H, PSY471H
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYD51H3    Current Topics in Perception

The course provides an intensive examination of selected topics in recent research on perception. Topics may include research in vision, action, touch, hearing and multisensory integration. Selected readings will cover psychological and neuropsychological findings, neurophysiological results, synaesthesia and an introduction to the Bayesian mechanisms of multisensory integration.

Prerequisite: PSYB51H3 and [[0.5 credit from the PSYC50-series of courses] or NROC64H3]
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYD54H3    Current Topics in Visual Recognition

The course provides an intensive examination of selected topics in the research of visual recognition. Multiple components of recognition, as related to perception, memory and higher-level cognition, will be considered from an integrative psychological, neuroscientific and computational perspective. Specific topics include face recognition, visual word recognition and general object recognition.

Prerequisite: [PSYB51H3 or PSYB57H3] and [0.5 credit from the PSYC50-series of courses or NROC64H3]
Exclusion: [PSYD50H3 if taken in Winter 2014, 2015, or 2016], PSYD51H3
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYD66H3    Current Topics in Human Brain and Behaviour

An extensive examination of selected human brain and behaviour topics introduced in PSYB65H3. The neural bases of mental functions such as language, learning, memory, emotion, motivation and addiction are examples of the topics that may be included. Students will be expected to read and discuss current empirical research in this field.

Prerequisite: PSYB65H3
Corequisite: One additional C-level half-credit in Psychology
Recommended Preparation: PSYB07H3 or STAB22H3 or their equivalent
Enrolment Limits: 24
Breadth Requirement: Natural Sciences

PSYD98Y3    Thesis in Psychology

This course offers the opportunity to engage in a year long research project under the supervision of an interested member of the faculty in Psychology. The project will culminate in a written report in the form of a thesis and a poster presentation. During the course of the year, at appropriate times, students will meet to present their own research proposals, to appraise the proposals of others, and to discuss the results of their investigation. Students must first find a supervisor, which is usually confirmed before the start of the academic term in which the project will be initiated. Students will meet as a group with the coordinator as well as individually with their supervisor. This course is restricted to Specialists in Psychology and Mental Health Studies with a cumulative GPA of 3.3 or higher. Students planning to pursue graduate studies are especially encouraged to enrol in the course. Students must obtain a permission form from the Psychology departmental website (www.utsc.utoronto.ca/psych/undergraduates) that is to be completed and signed by the intended supervisor, and submitted to the Psychology Office. At that time, the student will be provided with an outline of the schedule and general requirements for the course. Students seeking supervision off campus will need to arrange co-supervision with a faculty member in Psychology at this campus.

Prerequisite: PSYB01H3 & PSYB07H3 & PSYC08H3, Psychology or Mental Health Studies Specialist, cumulative GPA of 3.3 or higher. Note: Registration in D-level courses on ROSI is tentative. This is to ensure spaces in these courses for students who need them to graduate at the end of the current session. ROSI will show your status in the course and its final confirmation.
Exclusion: NROD98Y3, COGD10H3, PSY400Y

(PLIB25H3)  Second Language Acquisition
PLIC24H3  First Language Acquisition
PLIC54H3  Speech Physiology and Speech Disorders in Children and Adults
PLIC55H3  Psycholinguistics
PLIC75H3  Language and the Brain
PLID34H3  The Psycholinguistics of Reading
PLID44H3  Acquisition of the Mental Lexicon
PLID50H3  Speech Perception
PLID55H3  Disorders of Speech and Language
PLID56H3  Special Topics in Language Disorders in Children

These courses may be used as Psychology courses to fulfill Psychology program requirements.  (See the Linguistics section of this Calendar for full descriptions).


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