October 3 - Where are the Nations of Immigrants? An Historian Talks to the 21st Century

 

Prof. Donna Gabaccia is a Professor of History at the University of Toronto and past Director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. She is the author of 14 books, and dozens of articles, on immigrant class, gender, and food studies in the United States; on Italian migration around the world, and on migration in world history.  Her 2015 book, Gender and International Migration, co-authored with sociologist and demographer Katharine Donato, was awarded an Honourable Mention from the American Sociological Association’s Znaniecki Prize.  Her work in public history earned her the 2013 University of Minnesota Outstanding Community Service Award for Faculty and the 2012 Society of American Archivists, Hamer-Kegan Award for the Immigration History Research Center Project, “Digitizing Immigrant Letters.”  She is currently Chair of the Executive Board of the Toronto Ward Museum. She teaches undergraduate, and graduate, courses in History, Women’s Studies and Food Studies, focusing on migration, gender, and diasporas, in world history, digital history, and gender in the kitchen.

 

October 3 - Where are the Nations of Immigrants?  An Historian Talks to the 21st Century

Even as the countries of Europe and the United States question the continued importance, and role, of immigrants and refugees in their societies and economies, many in the United States continue to pride themselves on being members of an American “nation of immigrants.” Few people there, or elsewhere, realize that the demographic and cultural impact of international migration -past and present- has been much greater on other countries, including Canada, Australia, and Argentina. Why did historical migrations produce so few nations of immigrants?  And, in our own changing times, will Canada replace the United State as a nation of immigrants that serve as a model for other countries? 

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