Celebration of Research Excellence Lecture Series

 

Celebration of Research Excellence Lecture Series

Research Recognition Award Recipient 2015

Marc Cadotte, Department of Biological Sciences:

Healthy ecosystems, healthy cities

Governments use many reasons to justify spending money on conservation. One  reason is that biodiversity provides benefits to people. But what are those benefits? This talk discusses what we know, and more importantly, what we need to know about the importance of biodiversity to ensure we have healthy environments.

Date: Thursday, October 19, 2017

Location: Room AA160  /  Time: 12:00 to 1:00 pm

Celebration of Research Excellence Lecture Series

Research Excellence Faculty Scholar 2016

Frank Wania, Department of Physical & Environmental Sciences:

Dilution is not a pollution solution

Why is the Inuit’s traditional diet contaminated with industrial chemicals? Why are pesticides more prevalent in mountainous nature reserves than close to agricultural areas? Why are we often more contaminated than the food we eat? Identifying, understanding and quantifying the processes that cause contaminants to be amplified allows us to explain those counter-intuitive observations and ultimately can help us designing better chemicals and products.

Date: Thursday, November 16, 2017

Location: Room AA160  /  Time: 12:00 to 1:15 pm

Celebration of Research Excellence Lecture Series

Research Excellence Faculty Scholar 2016

Michael Inzlicht, Department of Psychology: 

Against self-control

The notion that self-control leads to the good life—that it helps people live full, healthy, and happy lives—is an idea that has stood the test of time, being extolled by luminaries such as Plato, Freud, and Yoda. In this talk, I want to suggest that self-control—defined as effortful self-restraint—might not be all that important in helping people meet their longstanding goals. Instead, I suggest that desire and motives are more important.

Date: Thursday, December 7, 2017

Location: Room AA160  /   Time: 12:00 to 1:15 pm

Celebration of Research Excellence Lecture Series

Research Recognition Award Recipient 2016

Anthony Ruocco, Department of Psychology:

Mental illness and the brain: Research implications for detection and treatment of borderline personality disorder

Borderline personality disorder is a serious mental disorder that includes dangerous and impulsive behaviours, severe mood changes and even attempts at suicide. Attention and other brain functions of those people with the disorder work slightly differently. Could studying these brain function differences help us identify who will develop the disorder and how best to treat it?

Date: Thursday, January 25, 2018

Location: Room AA160  Time: 12:00 to 1:15 pm

Celebration of Research Excellence Lecture Series

Research Recognition Award Recipient 2017

Li Chen, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies:

Litigation and justice in late imperial China

Although Confucian moralists had long advised against conflicts and litigation, even illiterate peasants in late imperial China (1400s-1911) often brought lawsuits to the local governments to protect their interests. It was an enormous challenge to handle the numerous cases in nineteenth-century China with a population of nearly 400 million, especially as the 2,000 or so officials often had not received any legal training before they were appointed to manage the local governments. This talk reveals how ordinary people in early modern China made use of the otherwise intimidating legal system, how justice was administered in a Confucian society, and how findings from this research might help us understand legal and social practices today. 

Date: Thursday, February 8, 2018

Location: Room AA160  /  Time: 12:00 to 1:15 pm

Celebration of Research Excellence Lecture Series

Principal's Research Award Recipient 2017

Jamie Donaldson, Department of Physical & Environmental Sciences: 

Skimming the surface, but not superficially: Atmospheric chemistry at interfaces

Chemistry in the atmosphere impacts us all -- think about air pollution and climate change. But not all chemical interactions take place in the air. What happens when air meets the ocean surface, or when air meets building surfaces, for instance, can also contribute to pollution and global warming. Professor Donaldson presents work from his research group and its collaborators, that has uncovered some unexpected, yet key, findings that have the potential for significant impact.

Date: Thursday, March 1, 2018

Location: Room AA160  /  Time: 12:00 to 1:15 pm

Celebration of Research Excellence Lecture Series

Research Excellence Faculty Scholar 2016

Lisa Jeffrey, Department of Computer & Mathematical Sciences:

Rabbits and foxes: Who will win?

Something that will never change is the fact that the world is constantly changing. But we can make sense of many things thanks to differential equations like Newton’s law of cooling, that tells us how quickly a hot mug of coffee will cool to room temperature, or the predator-prey equation, that helps us predict the relative populations of predator fox and their rabbit prey. Differential equations are the language in which the laws of nature are expressed. Understanding these number sentences, and the properties of their solutions, is fundamental to much of contemporary science and engineering. 

Date: Thursday, March 22, 2018

Location: Room AA160  /  Time: 12:00 to 1:15 pm

 

Celebration of Research Excellence Lecture Series

Canada Research Chair 2013-2018 

Marney Isaac, Department of Physical & Environmental Sciences / Centre for Critical Development Studies:

Title TBD

Date: Thursday, April 5, 2018

Location: Room AA160  /  Time: 12:00 to 1:15 pm

Celebration of Research Excellence Lecture Series

Canada Research Chair 2016-2021

Bebhinn Treanor, Department of Biological Sciences:

Title TBD

Date: Thursday, April 19, 2018

Location: Room AA160  /  Time: 12:00 to 1:15 pm