Programs

UTSC Philosophy offers five programs:

  • Specialist program in philosophy
  • Specialist (co-operative) program in philosophy
  • Major program in philosophy
  • Major (co-operative) program in philosophy
  • Minor program in philosophy
  • Minor program in biomedical ethics


For a detailed list of the requirements necessary for successful completion of each program, please visit the Philosophy section of the UTSC Academic Calendar. This page also includes a complete list of courses being offered, including course descriptions, timetables, and instructors.

 

What do we offer?


Our B-level courses are medium-sized lecture classes covering one of the major areas in philosophy: for example theory of knowledge, ancient philosophy, or political philosophy.

Our C-level courses are smaller and more discussion-based; here we cover significant sub-areas of these major areas in more detail: rather than a general course on theory of knowledge, a C-level course might discuss skepticism; rather than a general course on ancient philosophy, a C-level course might discuss Plato.

Our department offers concentrations at three levels of intensity: minor, major, and specialist programs.

Our specialist program is for the student with a very high level of dedication to philosophy. Specialists take 24 half-courses, which works out in practice to between three and four in a typical semester. The specialist can be confident of acquiring a thorough and deep exposure to a great many areas of philosophy.

Our majors take 14 half-courses, which works out in practice to two or three in a typical semester. This leaves room for a major in a second field. A double-major in philosophy and, for example, physics, English, math, economics, neuroscience, or linguistics can provide synergies that are valuable in many ways: one’s philosophical training enables one to look more deeply at the foundations of one’s other field; one’s training in the other field provides one with valuable data against which to formulate or assess philosophical theories.

Specialists and majors take a high percentage of their courses in smaller, more intimate C- and D-level courses, where papers are marked intensively by professors.

Our specialists and majors have a very high level of esprit de corps, meeting regularly through the Association of Philosophy Students for debates, talks, movie nights, and other social events, and to put on an annual international undergraduate conference.

Finally, the minor in philosophy requires eight half-courses: one or two in a typical semester. This program is for the student who wishes to do more with philosophy than get their feet wet but who does not have room for our major program, or for the student who discovers philosophy late in the undergraduate career but seeks an intensive exposure as a ‘capstone’ experience. A minor in philosophy can serve as a distinguishing credential for one who pursues a career outside of philosophy, or as preparation for MA study in philosophy.