Educator Exchange Video Archive

Power and Knowledge in the Classroom and Beyond

Power and Knowledge in the Classroom and Beyond

 
January 11, 2018
The intent of this workshop is to look at power as a central feature of classroom dynamics and teaching-learning processes. As instructors, we have to strike a delicate balance between our institutional, pedagogical and subject-matter authority and our desire to create genuinely open and inclusive learning spaces for collective meaning-making and knowledge production. We invite workshop participants to reflect on how we can productively reimagine power-knowledge frameworks in- and outside the classroom. Engaging in critical conversations about power and knowledge is all the more important today with an increased political and institutional push for experiential and community-engaged forms of learning. We see this as an opportunity to share power and value a multitude of knowledges and experiences outside of traditional academic practice.
 
This workshop will provide pragmatic ways to engage thoughtfully in power and knowledge in the classroom. We will present concrete examples from our shared experience teaching community-engaged university courses, including a youth-led participatory action research course in East Scarborough and a Walls to Bridges course, an innovative learning community in correctional settings for both incarcerated and traditionally-enrolled students. Despite the focus on community-engaged learning, the broader conversation about power and knowledge in and out of the classroom will be relevant to all instructors and course formats.
 
 
Presenters: 
 
• Jennifer Esmail, Coordinator, Academic Initiatives, Centre for Community Partnerships
• Ahmed Allahwala, Human Geography

Teaching from Anti Racist Pedagogy AS IF IT MATTERS

Teaching from Anti Racist Pedagogy AS IF IT MATTERS

November 21st, 2017
We now live in a diverse, postmodern, ever-evolving society. As always, race and social class are inextricably linked together. The public education system has to be a major player in the transformation of Canada into a much more inclusive and positive society for all people. (Paul Orlowski, 2001: 266). Current educational innovations in schools seek to enhance the teaching, learning and administration of education for a diverse school body. Within Canadian contexts, a key question has been how schools respond to the needs and concerns of a diverse school body.  Could the Anti-racist education be a first step in the transformation process? I argue that the task of genuine educational transformation is not simply to reform existing teaching pedagogical practices, but to begin by addressing the pointed problems of social difference and knowledge production in our teaching, as well as emphasizing social and cultural values that promote alternative readings of the world. Among the questions raised are: How do we take up diversity and difference in our teaching? How do we identify the invisible and hidden biases that might hinder students’ learning? By employing critical educational pedagogies and social theories is it possible to articulate a pedagogic dis-course to understand the political organization and issues of equity or inequality in our universities?  The pedagogic challenge includes assumptions of what is normative, what is valid knowledge and what are the alternatives to the dominant discourses.
 
Using an anti-racist teaching pedagogy as if it matters, I explore interconnections between educational institutions and society through a discursive framework that illustrates the functioning and relationships of sub-systems within the larger society (Wane, 2000, 2015).  I propose that we begin to get beyond the initial impulse to chalk up conflict and resistance to individualized/personalized ‘bad attitude’, and to become aware of the historical context of contemporary social relations globally. 

 
Presenter:
  • Njoki Wane, Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education; President’s Teaching Award

 


Using Assessment to Nurture Critical Thinking

Using Assessment to Nurture Critical Thinking

November 8th, 2017
A primary goal of virtually all educators is to help their students to think deeply about important concepts and ideas and to use their knowledge to construct innovative responses to complex issues and problems.  When assessment is used primarily to assess the end product or performance, important opportunities to support and extend student learning are often missed.  An important element of nurturing critical thinking in higher education involves self-regulated learning and collaborative thinking that are both enhanced through the use of “assessment for” and “assessment as” learning.
In the first half of this workshop, Garfield will connect a framework for critical inquiry to effective assessment by examining how assessing the intellectual tools for rigorous thought can provide rich opportunities for students to peer and self-assess. The second half of the session will provide an opportunity for instructors to consider tweaks they may make to assignments used in their classes to ensure critical inquiry is nurtured.
 
Presenter:
 

  • Garfield Gini-Newton, Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, OISE

Journal Clubs: Teaching Students to Read Academic Articles

Journal Clubs: Teaching Students to Read Academic Articles

September 26th, 2017
Journal clubs are commonplace in graduate education, where they serve largely as a forum for encouraging graduate students to stay current with the primary literature. By contrast, journal clubs are rare in undergraduate education. While it may not be so important for undergraduate students to keep up with the literature, journal clubs can be reconfigured to help meet the objectives of a quality undergraduate education. In this session, we will discuss both the pedagogical value and logistical considerations of running journal clubs in an undergraduate science course.
 
Presenter:

  • Jason Brown, Lecturer, Biological Sciences

Community Engaged Pedagogy

Community Engaged Pedagogy

 
March 9th, 2017
This interactive workshop will address the myriad ways in which community engagement and pedagogy can be combined to produce discipline-rich learning outcomes alongside rewarding teaching experiences. Drawing from examples that span a range of community engaged learning (CEL) methods, including internships, service learning, eld trips and international study tours, we will explore opportunities for integrating CEL as a means of enriching teaching and learning.
A one hour presentation will be followed with an additional hour for idea exchange.

 
Presenter:

  • Shauna Brail, Associate Professor, Teaching Stream & Director, Urban Studies Program

PowerPoint Slides: Community Engaged Pedagogy

 


Putting Comments Where They Matter

Putting Comments Where They Matter

January 11th, 2017
Writing Intensive Assignments with real-time coordinated feedback from multiple sources.
Many students struggle with the fundamentals of writing, let alone the niceties of argumentation in university essays.  Over a four-year period, I tracked student writing performance in my large, year-long, B-level political science course.  Despite an extensive investment of TA and other class resources toward improving student writing, my tracking revealed precisely no improvement in student writing performance over the course of six writing assignments and an entire academic year.  What went wrong? 
This presentation traces the evolution of writing assignments, support, and assessment in POLB50.  The practice of providing feedback with grades on writing assignments turned out to be mostly ineffective and immensely inefficient.  A new approach, which includes a flexible assignment structure and real-time targeted feedback across all stages of the writing process, has improved student confidence and performance.  
A one hour presentation will be followed with an additional hour for idea exchange.
 
Presenter:

  • Christopher Cochrane - Associate Professor - Political Science

Engaging Students in Active Learning

Engaging Students in Active Learning

February 25th, 2016
In this session, I will share both practical advice and research results from our experience with active learning in two computer science courses. One is an introductory, first-year course with very diverse students, and the other is a third-year course for specialists. Bring your own experiences and questions to share, and expect to try an activity from my own classroom. (You’ll even learn a wee bit of computer science!)
 
Presenter:

  • Diane Horton (Computer Science, St. George)

Instructional Uses of Social / Digital Media

Instructional Uses of Social / Digital Media

March 3rd, 2014
What are the latest exciting and innovative ways for instructors to use social media or other types of digital media?  Find out at this session, where you’ll also be able to witness a meeting of minds from across the disciplines, coming together to share their creative uses of new media to enhance students’ learning.
 
 
 
Presenters:

  • Leslie Chan, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Critical Development Studies / International Studies
  • Bill Gough, Vice-Dean, Graduate Education and Program Development, and Associate Professor, Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences
  • Daniel Tysdal, Lecturer, Department of English
  • Brian Sutherland (moderator), Educational Technologies Administrator

Writing as Skill, Writing to Learn

Writing as Skill / Writing to Learn

February 6th, 2014
In this session, faculty from diverse fields (French, Management, and English) will discuss different approaches to teaching writing or using writing as a teaching tool.  Topics will include the following: how important learning takes place incrementally (contemplative pedagogy, “slow learning”); uses of blogs, journals, portfolios and Twitter; writing strategies in a second language environment; ways of scaffolding a series of writing assignments; helping students overcome their resistance to writing and become more self-aware writers, able to leverage their own individual writing process.
 
Presenters:

  • Corinne Beauquis, Senior Lecturer and Associate Director, Centre for French and Linguistics
  • April Franco, Associate Professor, Department of Management
  • Anne Milne, Assistant Professor, Department of English
  • Sarah King (moderator), Senior Lecturer and Coordinator, The Writing Centre