History

(B.A.)

Discipline Representative: A. N. Sheps (287-7133)

The study of history is intended to enhance our understanding of human society by examining the experiences of particular peoples and their societies in the past. Its findings depend upon the precise evaluation of specific evidence. History's concerns and goals are humanistic; its methods draw from all forms of scholarly endeavour. History courses, therefore, can play a part in a number of interdisciplinary programmes and can serve as an adjunct to courses in Politics, Philosophy, Literature, Economics, and Sociology. History can also be usefully combined with language study.

The History curriculum combines a variety of approaches and teaching in order to satisfy a number of purposes.HISA01Y provides both a general introduction to the study of history at the university level, and the preparation for further studies in European history. HISA02S is a general interest course. A series of survey courses HISB02-09) provides a comprehensive foundation of knowledge in their particular areas, and also serves as preparation for more detailed and advanced studies. In upper-level courses students investigate more specific areas, periods, or problems. D-series courses are conducted as seminars. In them students make close and thorough studies of particular questions and present their findings in discussions and major essays. There are sequences of courses at all levels in the following areas: Medieval European, Modern European, British, American, Canadian, Russian, and Ancient Greek and Roman.

Specialist Programme in History

Supervisor: M. Eksteins (287-7148)

1 Number of Courses

Students must complete ten full-course equivalents in History (HIS or GRH). These ten must includeHISA01Y and five upper-level full-course equivalents (C/D-level courses on the Scarborough Campus, 300/400-level courses on the St. George Campus). At least one of the five must be a D/400-level course. In addition, students must complete two full-course equivalents in disciplines other than History. Students are encouraged to follow a sequence of language courses in fulfillment of this requirement.

2 Pre-1815 Courses

Of the ten at least two full-course equivalents must deal with the period prior to 1815 (all GRH and CLA political and social history courses, and as indicated in the HIS course descriptions).

3 Areas of Study

Students are also required to take courses in at least three different areas as indicated in the course descriptions.

Among the five upper-level full-course equivalents at least two courses must be within one area (one and one-half full-course equivalents may meet this requirement).

Major Programme in History

Supervisor: M. Eksteins (287-7148)

1 Number of Courses

Students must complete seven full-course equivalents in History (HIS or GRH) or CLA political and social history courses. These seven must includeHISA01Y and three upper-level courses(C/D-level courses on the Scarborough Campus, 300/400-level courses on the St. George Campus).

2 Pre-1815 Course

Of the seven at least one full-course equivalent must deal with the period prior to 1815 (All GRH courses and as indicated in the HIS course descriptions).

3 Areas of Study

Students are also required to take courses in at least two different areas as indicated in the course descriptions.

Minor Programme in History

Supervisor: M. Eksteins (287-7148)

Students must complete four full courses or the equivalent in History, of which at least one full course (or two half courses) must be at the C- and/or D-level.

Note: Students are advised to consult the prerequisites for C-level and D-level courses when planning their individual programmes.

Courses Offered in 1994-95

HISA01Y The European World: An Introduction to History

Telephone ID #: 07510163

A survey of European history from the Middle Ages to the present.

This course examines the most prominent changes in social and economic organization, in thought, and in politics, as Europe developed from a feudal and agrarian to a modern and industrial order. The teaching method is based on lectures and tutorials. A set of readings from primary and secondary sources will be assigned, but further reading by the student is essential.

Exclusion: HIS105, HIS109

0.5 Pre-1815 credit

European Area

Session: Winter Day

J. Pearl, M. Eksteins

Offered 1995/96 and 1996/97

HISB02Y Britain from the Eighteenth Century to the Present

Telephone ID #: 07520263

An examination of the political, social, economic, and religious forces which transformed an aristocratic society into an industrial power, and of the reasons for the decline of British power in the twentieth century.

The course will be concerned with the problems caused by the transformation of an agrarian into a highly industrialized economy, of an aristocratic into a liberal democratic society, and of a society based on the ideology of the Enlightenment into one committed to that of evangelical humanitarianism. It will also consider why, in the twentieth century, the British abandoned their imperial role and concentrated on the establishment of a welfare state. Two lectures per week.

Exclusion: HIS239

British Area

Session: Summer Evening and Winter Day

F. Iacovetta

Offered 1995/96 and 1996/97

HISB03Y History of the United States

Telephone ID #: 07520363

Major themes from the Revolution to the present.

The course will focus on such questions as independence, political organization, political parties, territorial expansion, nationalism and sectionalism, reform movements, the slavery and civil rights question, the response to industrialization, progressivism, and the United States as a world power. Two lectures per week.

Exclusion: HIS271

American Area

Session: Winter Day

A. N. Sheps

Offered 1995/96 and 1996/97

HISB04Y Introduction to Canadian History

Telephone ID #: 07520463

An introduction to the history of Canada from the first European contacts to the present.

Topics studied include: exploration and settlement; the institutions and life of New France; the British Conquest and its results; the impact of the American Revolution on British North America; development of the British colonies in North America; the confederation movement; the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the new nation-state established in 1867. Two hours of lectures per week.

Exclusion: HIS260, 261, 262, 263

Canadian Area

Session: Winter Evening

F. Iacovetta, I. R. Robertson

Offered 1995/96 and 1996/97

HISB05F History of Africa since 1800

Telephone ID #: 07520533

An introduction to the history and cultures of Africa, primarily sub-Saharan African societies.

The main topics will include: population movements, trade and technology, the growth of African kingdoms and empires, the impact of the interaction between Africa and the industrial West, the historical development of African peoples during and through the partition of Africa, colonial domination and resistance, economic change and modern nation-building.

Prerequisite: None

Exclusion: (HUMB30)

Session: Winter Evening

TBA

HISB06Y Europe in the Middle Ages

Telephone ID #: 07520663

A chronological survey of economic, political, religious, and social developments in Western Europe (including Britain) from the late Roman period to the fifteenth century.

The object of this course is to familiarize students with the foundations of Western society as they evolved in conjunction with the early settlement, colonization, and subsequent expansion of Europe. Particular attention is paid: (i) to the peculiar circumstances which determined national boundaries and which led to the divisions and conflicts of the modern world, and (ii) to the origin and development of our own religious, legal, educational and political institutions. Readings are from P. Brown, The World of Late Antiquity; G. Duby, Rural Economy and Country Life in the Medieval West; D. Hay, The Medieval Centuries; R. W. Southern, Western Society and the Church in the Middle Ages; and others. Two hours of lectures per week.

Exclusion: HIS220

Pre-1815 credit

Medieval Area

Session: Winter Day

TBA

Offered 1996/97

HISB07Y Russia from the Thirteenth Century to the Present

Telephone ID #: 07520763

The Russian people, state, and culture, with emphasis on the major social, institutional, and ideological changes from the rise of Moscow to the present.

Wherever possible readings have been selected from primary source materials so that students will become acquainted not only with the facts but the flavour of Russian history. Lectures and discussion.

Exclusion: HIS250

0.5 Pre-1815 credit

Russian Area

Session: Winter Day

E. W. Dowler

Offered 1995/96 and 1996/97

HISB08S The Sixteenth Century Religious Reformations

Telephone ID #: 07520853

How and why does a culture rework its worldview? What happens when it does?

In the early sixteenth century most west Europeans were Catholics; by the end of the century Catholicism had changed greatly and substantial minorities had replaced it with other forms of Christianity (e.g. Lutheranism, Calvinism, Anglicanism, "anabaptism"). The course explores the breakup of the medieval church, the creation of the modern forms of Western Christianity, and the connections between ideas and social change.

Exclusion: (HISB13) HISC83Y)

Prerequisite:HISA01Y

0.5 Pre-1815 credit

European Area

Session: Winter Day

TBA

Not offered 1995/96

Offered 1996/97

HISC10Y The Sexes Since 1350

Telephone ID #: 07531063

An exploration of changing definitions of femininity and masculinity from the Renaissance to the recent past.

Topics will include: changes in expectations for men and women in their domestic, parental, and public roles (with the latter including education, employment, politics, and war); relations between the sexes; feminism and anti-feminism. The focus will be on the British Isles, Western Europe, and Canada, and on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Lecture and discussion: three hours.

Exclusion: (HISB10) HIS308

Prerequisite: One of HISA01, HISB02,HISB03,HISB04, orWSTA01 (JHSA01)

Session: Winter Day

L. J. Abray

Offered 1995/96 and 1996/97

HISC11Y France from Reformation to Revolution 1500-1789

Telephone ID #: 07531163

The development of French politics and society from the wars of religion to the reign of Louis XVI.

This period is characterized by rapid, often traumatic change in which France forcefully asserted itself as the principal power on the European continent. Special consideration will be given to the relations between political developments and social, religious and intellectual phenomena. One two-hour lecture and one tutorial session per week.

Exclusion: (HISB11) HIS349

Prerequisite: HISA01Y

Pre-1815 credit

European Area

Session: Winter Day

J.L. Pearl

Not offered 1995/96

HISC18Y Europe in the Enlightenment,
1700-1789

Telephone ID #: 07531863

An examination of the ideals of the Enlightenment against the background of the social and political reality of Europe in the eighteenth century.

Emphasis will be placed on the incongruity of theory and practice in the writings and policies of the enlightened despots. In the first term the course will focus on the ideas of the Enlightenment and the social, economic, and intellectual milieu which spawned them. In the second term the attempts of the so-called enlightened despots to apply Enlightenment ideas to the life of their states will be examined. Lectures and discussion.

Exclusion: (HISB18) HIS244

Prerequisite:HISA01

Pre-1815 credit

European Area

Session: Winter Day

E. W. Dowler

Offered 1995/96 and 1996/97

HISC23Y Tudor and Stuart England

Telephone ID #: 07532363

England from the end of the Wars of the Roses to the Glorious Revolution, 1485-1688.

The course gives an overview of political, economic, social, and cultural patterns. Special attention will be given to four themes: the powers and personalities of the rulers; Parliament and the rule of law; the great religious crisis and its spillover into civil war; the cultural heritage. Two lecture hours and one tutorial per week.

Exclusion: (HISB23) HIS238

Prerequisite: Any B-level full-course equivalent

Pre-1815 credit

British Area

Session: Winter Evening

TBA

Offered 1995/96 and 1996/97

HISC31S Slavery and the American South

Telephone ID #: 07533153

An examination of Southern society and slavery from the colonial period to the Civil War. Topics will include the origins and growth of slavery and the plantation, the economics of slavery, race relations, daily life under slavery and Southern political and social structure and ideas.

Exclusion: (HISB31)

Prerequisite:HISB03

American Area

Session: Winter Day

M. Wayne

HISC45F Immigrants and Race Relations in Canadian History

Telephone ID #: 07534533

The history of immigrants, immigration policy, and race relations in Canada from the European-Native contact period to the post-World War II era. Organized partly chronologically and partly by theme, the lectures and reading material will introduce students both to the perspectives and methodologies of the field and to the diversity of the ethnic/racial experience in Canada. Immigrants' lives as pioneer farmers, male sojourners, industrial workers, domestics, entrepreneurs, radicals, and as members of families are considered. The course highlights the experience of such groups as Canada's first peoples, the famine Irish, West Coast Asians, continental Europeans, and American and West Indian Blacks.

Prerequisite:HISB04

Session: Summer Evening

F. Iacovetta

Not offered Winter Session 1994/95 and 1996/97

Offered 1995/96

HISC46Y Atlantic Canada

Telephone ID #: 07534663

An examination of the Maritime provinces and Newfoundland from the first European contacts to Confederation in each province.

Subjects to be investigated include: native peoples and the impact of European contact; French regime and the development of a distinctive Acadian people; the dispersal of the Acadians; British settlement; responses to the American Revolution; the Loyalist impact; colonial economies and social structures; literary and intellectual developments; struggles for responsible government, and its eventual loss in Newfoundland; religious and ethnic tensions; fishermen's movements in Newfoundland; the coming of Confederation. One two-hour lecture per week, plus tutorials. Written work will include two research papers.

Exclusion: (HISB46) HIS468

Prerequisite:HISB04

0.5 Pre-1815 credit

Canadian Area

Session: Winter Day

I. R. Robertson

Offered 1995/96 and 1996/97

HISC47Y The Canadian Left, 1867 to the Present

Telephone ID #; 07534763

An investigation of farmer, labour, and socialist movements since Confederation, their roots in the changing social structure, and their political manifestations.

The emphasis will be on the twentieth century, and attempts will be made to assess the significance of the international affiliations and/or origins of the various movements, and to account for the unique character of the Canadian Left. In broad terms, the course objectives are (i) to encourage the study of social classes who have been excluded from the exercise of power in Canada, and to examine the ways in which they have organized to protect their interests; and (ii) to explore the relationship between social change and popular, reform, radical, and socialist movements. One two-hour lecture per week, plus tutorials. Written work will include two research papers.

Exclusion: (HISB47)

Prerequisite:HISB04

Canadian Area

Session: Winter Day

I. R. Robertson

Not offered 1995/96

Offered 1996/97

HISC48S Black Canadian History, 1606-1919

Telephone ID #: 07534853

An examination of the history and presence of people of African descent from their earliest known arrival in Canada to the end of World War I, placing the black Canadian historical experience within the context of Canadian history.

Topics will include: black immigration, slavery in New France, British North America and Canada, the impact of American slavery, Canadian anti-slavery movements, and Caribbean immigration, the growth and development of Canada's black communities, and their religious, educational and political experiences and institutions.

Prerequisite:HISB04Y

Canadian Area

Session: Winter Evening

TBA

HISC78F Social History of Imperial Russia, 1700-1900

Telephone ID #: 07537833

The development of Russian society from the revolutionary reforms of Peter the Great to the counter-revolutionary reforms of Alexander III. The evolution of social classes, the nature of Russian peasant society, women in society, urbanization, and proletarianization will be among topics discussed in this course.

Prerequisite:HISB07

Russian Area

Session: Winter Evening

E.W. Dowler

Not offered 1995/96

HISC86F Revolutionary France, 1780-1800

Telephone ID #: 07538633

The age of revolution and its continuing importance.

The course will study the elements of tradition and continuity in this period as well as the more obvious areas of radical break with the past. A two hour lecture period and a one hour tutorial per week.

Prerequisite:HISA01Y

0.5 Pre-1815 credit

European Area

Session: Winter Day

J.L. Pearl

Not offered 1995/96

HISC87Y Germany in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Telephone ID #: 07538763

A thematic treatment of German history from the end of the Holy Roman Empire to the present.

The course will concentrate on social, economic, and cultural interpretations of Germany's political experience.

Two consecutive hours of lectures and one hour of tutorial per week. A set of readings from primary and secondary sources will be assigned, but extensive further reading is essential.

Exclusion: (HISB17) HIS317

Prerequisite:HISA01

European Area

Session: Winter Evening

M. Eksteins

Not offered 1995/96

Offered 1996/97

HISD01F
HISD02S
HISD03Y Independent Studies

A directed reading course for students in their final year of undergraduate study who have demonstrated a high level of academic maturity and competence. Qualified students will have an opportunity to investigate an historical field which is of common interest to both student and supervisor and which is not available for study otherwise. Candidates must find a willing supervisor and must submit a written application before the dates given below. Students meet regularly with the supervisor to discuss progress in their investigations and complete a 7,500-10,000 word paper for a term course and a 15,000-20,000 word paper for a year course.

Exclusions: (HISC01/02/03) HIS497, HIS498, HIS499

Prerequisite: At least one B-level full-course equivalent in History; permission of instructor to be obtained in the previous term, by 15 April for HISD01(HISC01) andHISD03(HISC03) and by 1 December forHISD02(HISC02). See History Supervisor for detailed application procedures.

Session: Winter Day

The History Faculty

HISD10F History of Feminism since the Eighteenth Century

Telephone ID #; 07541033 The ideas and careers of women and men who challenged the roles assigned to women from the French Revolution to the present.

The campaign for equality for women is one of the longest struggles against discrimination in western history. After industrialization feminists waged a broadening crusade for economic, educational, civil, and political rights. These campaigns, their social contexts, and the ideas of the antifeminists will be studied through examination of the feminists' own writings and of modern scholarly interpretations. Attention will also be paid to comparisons between historical and contemporary feminisms and between feminism and other campaigns against discrimination.

Prerequisite:HISC10Y

British/European Areas

Session: Winter Day

TBA

Offered 1995/96 and 1996/97

HISD11S Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe 1500-1800

Telephone ID #: 07541153

A seminar investigating concepts of law, court systems, and penalties in Early Modern Europe.

The course will examine how legal systems reflected their societies. Lay courts and ecclesiastical courts (inquisitions) will be studied. The use of torture, corporal, and capital punishment will be examined in the context of societies and their values. Limited enrolment: 20.

Prerequisite:HISA01 and one B or C level course in history.

0.5 Pre-1815 credit

British/European Areas

Session: Winter Day

J.L. Pearl

Not offered 1995/96

HISD32Y Colonial and Revolutionary America and the British Empire, 1607-1787

Telephone ID #: 07543263

An examination of the origins of American society and institutions in the seventeenth century and their development in the eighteenth century, the origins, course and effect of the American Revolution and the Constitution and their relation to Western political thought, and the impact of the Revolution on British North America and Britain.

A two-hour weekly seminar, based on suggested readings and class discussion.

Exclusion: HISD34F/S, HIS470

Prerequisite: Any one ofHISB02,HISB03,HISB04 orHISC18 (HISB18)

Pre-1815 credit

American/British Areas

Session: Winter Day

A. N. Sheps

Offered 1995/96

HISD46S Selected Topics in Canadian Women's History

Telephone ID #: 07544653

A seminar investigating the role, lives, and struggles of women in Canada from the time of initial European contacts with the First Peoples to the post-World War Two era.

The course will highlight the changing position of women in Canadian society, the relations between men and women and among women from different class, ethnic/racial, and political backgrounds, and the impact of state policies on women and gender relations. Topics could include native women in fur trade society, rural women, women and the law, sexuality and crime, middle-class women's roles in religion, reform, and politics, working class and radical women, and immigrant and minority women. Limited enrolment: 15.

Prerequisites: Any course in Canadian history orHISC10Y orHISD10F/S

Canadian Area

Session: Winter Evening

TBA

Not offered 1995/96

Courses in Classical Studies (see Classical Studies for full course descriptions offered in 1994/95):

GRHB01Y Greek History from the Bronze Age to the Death of Alexander

Pre-1815 credit

Ancient Greek and Roman

Session: Winter Day

A. Boddington


CLAC41F/S Slavery in the Roman Economy

Prerequisite:CLAA01Y

Exclusion: GRHB04Y

Session: Winter Day

J. H. Corbett

Not Offered 1995/96


CLAB42F/S Army and Empire in the Roman World

Prerequisite:CLAA01Y

Exclusion: GRHB04Y

Session: Winter Day

J. H. Corbett

Not Offered 1995/96


CLAC50F/S Women, Family and Household in Ancient Greece

Prerequisite:CLAA01Y

Exclusion: CLAC06F/S, CLA219H; CLA220H; CLA331H

Session: Winter Day

M. E. Irwin

Not Offered 1995/96


Courses Not Offered in 1994-95

HISA02F/S The Twentieth-Century World HISC16Y Modern France 1750 to the present
Exclusion: (HISB16)

Prerequisites: HISA01 or permission of instructor

HISC33F/S Society and Politics in the United States, 1790-1850
Prerequisite: HISB03

HISC35Y Twentieth-Century America

Exclusion: (HISB35) HIS372

Prerequisite: HISB03

HISC49F/S Canada Between the World Wars
Prerequisite: HISB04
HISC79F/S Social History of Revolutionary Russia, 1900 to the Present
Prerequisite: HISB07Y
HISC84F/S Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
Exclusions: (HISB14), (HISC14)
Prerequisite: HISA01

HISD15Y The Making of Modern Society

Exclusions: (HISB15) HISC15

Prerequisite:HISA01 and two other courses in post 1815 History, either European or North American

HISD17Y European Society and Culture in the Twentieth Century

Exclusions: (HISC17) HIS318, HIS412

Prerequisite:HISA01 and one B- or C-level course in History

HISD34F/S Revolutionary America, 1760-1790

Exclusion: (HISC34)HISD32Y

Prerequisite: Any one ofHISB02 orHISB03 orHISB04

HISD62Y The Crusades

Exclusion: (HISC62)

Prerequisite:HISB06

HISD78Y The Russian Intelligentsia

Exclusion: HISC78)

Prerequisite:HISB07 or RUSA01