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Environmental Science
(B.Sc.)

Contents
Courses
EESA01H3 EESA05H3 EESA06H3 EESA07H3 EESA08H3 EESA09H3 EESA10H3 EESA11H3
EESB02H3 EESB03H3 EESB04H3 EESB05H3 EESB09H3 EESB15H3 EESC03H3 EESC04H3
EESC07H3 EESC13H3 EESC15H3 EESC16H3 EESC18H3 EESC19H3 EESC21H3 EESC24H3
EESC30H3 EESC31H3 EESD02H3 EESD06H3 EESD07H3 EESD09H3 EESD10Y3 EESD11H3
EESD15H3 EESD32H3 IMCB01H3 STEB07H3 STEB21H3 STEB40H3 STEB42H3 STEB43H3
STEB44H3 STEC11H3 STEC15H3 STEC53H3 STEC60H3 STEC61H3

Faculty List

J.A. Westgate, B.Sc. (Reading), Ph.D. (Alberta), Professor Emeritus
R. B. Bryan, B.A. (Dublin), Ph.D. (Sheffield), Professor
N. Eyles, B.Sc. (Leicester), M.Sc. (Memorial University NFLD), Ph.D. (East Anglia), D.Sc. (Leicester), P.Geo., Professor
B. Greenwood, B.Sc., Ph.D. (Bristol), Ph.D. Hons. Causa (Uppsala), Professor
K.W.F. Howard, B.Sc., M.Sc. Ph.D. (Birmingham), Professor
V. Timmer, B.Sc.F., M.Sc.F., (University of New Brunswick), Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor
D.D. Williams, B.Sc. (University College, North Wales), Dip. Ed. (Liverpool), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Waterloo), D.Sc. (Wales), Professor
R.R. Fulthorpe, B.Sc., M.Sc., (Toronto), Ph.D. (Carleton) Associate Professor
W.A. Gough, B.Sc., M.Sc. (Toronto), Ph.D. (McGill), Associate Professor
A.G. Price, B.Sc. (Wales), M.Sc., Ph.D. (McGill), Associate Professor
A. Mohajer, M.Sc. (Florida State), Ph.D. (London), P. Geo., Adjunct Associate Professor
R.E. Gerber, B.Sc. (Waterloo), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Toronto). P.Geo., Adjunct Assistant Professor
M.J. Simpson, B.Sc., Ph.D. (Alberta) Assistant Professor
F. Wania, B.A. (Bayreuth), Ph.D. (Toronto), Assistant Professor
M. Doughty, B.Sc. (Toronto), P.Geo., M.Sc. (Toronto) Technician

Discipline Representative: N. Eyles (416-287-7231)
Human activity is a major cause of environmental change. Study of the dynamics of both natural and anthropogenic changes requires knowledge spanning many scientific disciplines. Recent environmental degradation such as surface and subsurface water pollution, air and soil pollution, climate change, depletion of resources, extinction of species and problems of waste disposal are all a result of the lack of understanding of environmental systems and processes. Environmental degradation has an impact not only on human beings but on all species and most natural systems, so that its understanding requires approaches and skills from many disciplines such as biology, chemistry, geology, geography, mathematics, physics, and ecology.
   A Specialist Program with three Streams, a Major Program, a Minor Program and, in addition, a Co-op Specialist Program are all available within Environmental Science at UTSC. The three specialist streams are: Environmental Geoscience, Environmental Biology and Environmental Chemistry. The Streams of the Major Program are designed for students who wish to pursue another Major or Specialist Program in a related discipline. All streams have a common core in the first two years; this reflects the strong interdisciplinary requirements of an integrated approach to the study of the environment and allows students to switch between streams if they wish.

A Joint Program in Environmental Science and Technology is offered in collaboration with the School of Engineering Technology and Applied Science of Centennial College.

The overall purpose of the various programs in Environmental Science is to provide education and training which will produce highly qualified scientists with excellent field and laboratory experience, with a view to future employment in consulting, government, non-governmental organizations and research and teaching.

All streams of the Specialist (Environmental Geoscience, Environmental Biology, Environmental Chemistry) and the Major (Environmental Science, Environmental Biology, Water Science) Programs are eligible for inclusion in the Co-operative Program in Physical Sciences and the Early Teacher Project in Physical Sciences. Please refer to the Physical Sciences Scarborough and the Co-operative Program sections of this Calendar for further details.

SPECIALIST (CO-OPERATIVE) PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Supervisor of Studies: A.G. Price (416-287-7327)
Co-op Co-ordinator: R. Louden (416-287-7254)
The Environmental Science Co-op Program is part of the Physical Sciences Co-op Program (see the Physical Sciences Scarborough section of this Calendar).
   The Co-operative Program allows students to take any one of three specialist streams in Environmental Science. Each of these streams has a strong basis in the fundamental sciences such as biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics, but emphasizes the environmental sciences such as geology, geography, atmospheric sciences and ecology. The Program is broadly based for the practicing environmental scientist and includes study in the areas of: Environmental Impact Assessment; Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems; Scientific Computing; Statistics. One of the thrusts of the specialist Program is the importance of field and laboratory work, which allows students the opportunity to develop skills which are directly useful in the work place.

For information on admissions, fees, work term and standing in the Program, please see the
Co-operative Programs section of this Calendar.

Work Terms

Students who entered the Program in 2001/2002 or later, must complete three work terms along with the academic Program. Students who entered before 2001/2002, must complete two work terms, with an optional third work term with permission of the Co-ordinator. Students must complete the Introduction to Environmental Science Co-op Tutorial before going on their first work term. Students are not permitted to complete more than one summer work term.

Course Requirements

For Program outlines, please refer to the description of the Specialist Program in Environmental Science below. Note that while it is strongly encouraged, courses need not be taken in exactly the indicated order. If an alternative ordering is adopted, care must be taken to ensure that prerequisites are satisfied and conflicts avoided.
NOTE: Each student's program requires the annual approval of the Supervisor of Studies. Students are individually responsible for ensuring that they have completed all Program and degree requirements for graduation.

SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Supervisor of Studies: A.G. Price (416-287-7327)
This Program has a firm base in the traditional environmental disciplines, that is, the earth, atmospheric and ecological sciences, but is built on an excellent grounding in the fundamental sciences of biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics. The acquisition of practical skills through extensive field and laboratory experience is emphasized. The Program is integrated in nature with a common core extending through all years of each of three specialist streams: Environmental Geoscience, Environmental Biology and Environmental Chemistry.
   A list of suggestions for elective courses can be obtained from the Supervisor of Studies.

Environmental Geoscience Stream

Advisor: A.G. Price (416-287-7327)
Total requirements: 14.5 FCE
Year 1:
EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science
EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth
BGYA01H Introductory Biology: Part I
BGYA02H Introductory Biology: Part II
CHMA10H Introductory Chemistry I: Structure and Bonding
CHMA11H Introductory Chemistry II: Reactions and Mechanisms
[MATA30H Calculus I
or
(MATA31H)] Calculus I (OAC)
[MATA35H Calculus II for Biological Sciences
or
MATA36H Calculus II for Physical Sciences
or
MATA37H] Calculus II for Mathematical Sciences
PHYA10H Introduction to Classical Physics

Year 2:
BGYB50H Ecology
PSCB57H Introduction to Scientific Computing
STAB22H Statistics
CHMB55H Environmental Chemistry
EESB02H Principles of Geomorphology
EESB03H Principles of Climatology
EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
EESB05H Principles of Soil Science
EESB15H Earth History

Year 3:
EESC03H Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
EESC04H Biodiversity and Biogeography
EESC07H Groundwater
EESC13H Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing
EESC15H Research Seminar in Environmental Science
EESC31H Glacial Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
and
0.5 FCEs from the following:
EESC19H Marine Systems
EESC18H The Great Lakes: A Lacustrine System

Year 4:
1.0 FCE from the following:
EESC21H Urban Environmental Problems of the Greater Toronto Area
EESD02H Contaminant Hydrogeology
EESD06H Climate Change Impact Assessment
EESD09H Research Project in Environmental Science
EESD10Y Research Project in Environmental Science
EESD11H Process Hydrology
EESD15H Cleaning up our Mess: Remediation of Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments
EESD32H Contaminant Fate in Terrestrial Environments
and
1.0 FCE from any other EES courses
Strongly recommended: EESC16H, EESD07H or BGYC53H

Environmental Biology Stream

Advisor: D.D. Williams (416-287-7423)
Total requirements: 14.5 FCE
Year 1:
EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science
EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth
BGYA01H Introductory Biology: Part I
BGYA02H Introductory Biology: Part II
CHMA10H Introductory Chemistry I: Structure and Bonding
CHMA11H Introductory Chemistry II: Reactions and Mechanisms
[MATA30H Calculus I
or
(MATA31H)] Calculus I (OAC)
[MATA35H Calculus II for Biological Sciences
or
MATA36H Calculus II for Physical Sciences
or
MATA37H Calculus II for Mathematical Sciences]
PHYA10H Introduction to Classical Physics

Year 2:
BGYB50H Ecology
BGYB51H Evolutionary Biology
BGYB52H Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Laboratory
EESB09H Biotechnology - Environmental Implications
EESB15H Earth History
STAB22H Statistics
[PSCB57H Introduction to Scientific Computing
or
CSCA08H] Introduction to Computer Programming
and
1.0 FCE from the following:
EESB03H Principles of Climatology
EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
EESB05H Principles of Soil Science
CHMB55H Environmental Chemistry

Year 3:
EESC03H Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
EESC04H Biodiversity and Biogeography
EESC15H Research Seminar in Environmental Science
EESC30H Microbial Biogeochemistry
BGYC59H Advanced Population Ecology
BGYC61H Advanced Community Ecology
BGYC63H Conservation Biology
and
0.5 FCE from the following:
(BGYC56H) Limnology
BGYC57H Evolutionary and Applied Biology of Insects
BGYC65H Environmental Toxicology

Year 4:
EESC13H Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing
and
0.5 FCE from the following:
EESD06H Climate Change Impact Assessment
EESD15H Cleaning up our Mess: Remediation of Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments
EESD32H Contaminant Fate in Terrestrial Environments
and
0.5 FCE from the following:
BGYC52H Ecology Field Course
BGYC53H Marine Biology
BGYC67H Inter-University Advanced Field Ecology
BGYD51H River Ecology

Strongly recommended:
BGYD01Y Supervised Study in Environmental Biology
or
EESD10Y Research Project in Environmental Science

Environmental Chemistry Stream

Advisor: J. Donaldson (416-287-7213)
Total requirements: 14.5 FCE
Year 1:
EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science
EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth
BGYA01H Introductory Biology: Part I
BGYA02H Introductory Biology: Part II
CHMA10H Introductory Chemistry I: Structure and Bonding
CHMA11H Introductory Chemistry II: Reactions and Mechanisms
[MATA30H Calculus I
or
(MATA31H)] Calculus I (OAC)
[MATA35H Calculus II for Biological Sciences
or
MATA36H Calculus II for Physical Sciences
or
MATA37H] Calculus II for Mathematical Sciences
PHYA10H Introduction to Classical Physics

Year 2:
BGYB50H Ecology
STAB22H Statistics
CHMB55H Environmental Chemistry
CHMB20H Chemical Thermodynamics and Elementary Kinetics
CHMB21H Chemical Structure and Spectroscopy
CHMB41H Organic Chemistry I
CHMB42H Organic Chemistry II
and
1.0 FCE from the following:
EESB03H Principles of Climatology
EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
EESB05H Principles of Soil Science
EESB15H Earth History

Year 3:
EESC03H Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
EESC13H Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing
EESC15H Research Seminar in Environmental Science
EESC07H Groundwater
CHMB16H Techniques in Analytical Chemistry
CHMB31H Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry
PSCB57H Introduction to Scientific Computing

Year 4:
EESD02H Contaminant Hydrogeology
EESD15H Cleaning up our Mess: Remediation of Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments
CHMC11H Principles of Analytic Instrumentation
and
0.5 FCE from the following:
CHMC21H Topics in Biophysical Chemistry
CHMC31Y Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry
CHMC41H Intermediate Organic Chemistry
CHMC47H Bio-Organic Chemistry

JOINT SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Supervisor of Studies: A.G. Price (416-287-7327)
This program is offered in collaboration with The School of Engineering Technology and Applied Science at Centennial College. The program may be taken in partial fulfillment of an Honours (Specialist) B.Sc. Degree from UTSC. In addition to completing the requirements for the degree, students will qualify for the Environmental Protection Technologist Diploma from Centennial College.

Program Admission requirements:

Limited enrolment. Students who are not admitted directly from high school must submit a joint program application form and request the program through ROSI.

Programme Requirements:

Students must complete 16.5 full course equivalents (FCE), as follows:
  1. Introductory (3.5 FCE):
    1. EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science
      and
      EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth
    2. CHMA10H Structure and Bonding
      and
      CHMA11H Reactions and Mechanisms
    3. BGYA01H Introductory Biology: Part I
      and
      BGYA02H Introductory Biology: Part II
    4. STAB22H Statistics
      or
      PSCB57H Introduction to Scientific Computing
  2. Fundamentals and Principles (3.5 FCE):
    1. BGYB50H Ecology
      and
      PHYA10H Introduction to Classical Physics
    2. [MATA30H Calculus I
      or
      (MATA31H)] Calculus I (OAC)
      and
      MATA36H Calculus II for Physical Sciences
    3. 1.5 FCE of the following:
      EESB02H Principles of Geomorphology
      EESB03H Principles of Climatology
      EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
      EESB05H Principles of Soil Science
      EESB09H Biotechnology - Environmental Implications
      EESB15H Earth History
  3. Applied and Technical (6.0 FCE):
    (These courses will be taught at Centennial College's Morningside Campus)
    1. STEB21H Organic Chemistry and Applications
      STEB07H Analytical Chemistry and Applications*
      IMCB01H Microbiology Basics*
      STEB40H Applied Environmental Microbiology
      STEC11H Applied Microbiological Analysis
      STEC15H Applied Analytical Instrumentation
    2. STEB42H Water Quality Control*
      STEB43H Engineering Equipment and Processes*
      STEC60H Applied Hydrology and Spills Management
      STEC61H Hazardous Wastes and Modern Industrial Processes
    3. STEB44H Environmental Legislation and Regulations*
      and
      [STEC53H Environmental Audits, Sampling and Data Management
      or
      EESC13H] Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing
  4. Advanced (3.5 FCE):
    1. EESC03H Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
      EESC04H Biodiversity and Biogeography
      EESC07H Groundwater
      EESC18H The Great Lakes: A Lacustrine System
      EESD02H Contaminant Hydrogeology
      EESD11H Process Hydrology
      EESD15H Cleaning up our mess: Remediation of Terrestrial and Aquatic Systems

* A minimum grade of 60% is required in courses marked with an asterisk in order to maintain standing in the program.

MAJOR PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Supervisor of Studies: A.G. Price (416-287-7327)
The Major Program is designed to provide an excellent background in the basic principles of Environmental Science and its application to current environmental issues. It is intended for students with an interest in environmental issues but who do not wish to specialize in the field. It is appropriate for students pursuing a three-year degree or those pursuing a four-year degree with more than one area of specialization (e.g. Biology, Chemistry, Physics, International Development Studies, Society and Environment). The program is offered in three streams: General Environmental Science, Environmental Biology and Water Science.

General Environmental Science Stream

Advisor: A.G. Price (416-287-7327)
Total requirements: 7.0 FCE
Year 1:
EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science
EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth
BGYA01H Introductory Biology: Part I
BGYA02H Introductory Biology: Part II

Year 2:
EESB02H Principles of Geomorphology
EESB03H Principles of Climatology
EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
EESB05H Principles of Soil Science
EESB15H Earth History
and
[STAB22H Statistics
or
CSCA08H Introduction to Computer Programming
or
PSCB57H] Introduction to Scientific Computing

Year 3:
BGYB50H Ecology
EESC03H Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
EESC13H Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing
EESC31H Glacial Sedimentology and Stratigraphy

Environmental Biology Stream

Advisor: R. Fulthorpe (416-287-7221)
Total Requirements: 7.0 FCE
Year 1:
EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science
EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth
BGYA01H Introductory Biology: Part I
BGYA02H Introductory Biology: Part II

Year 2:
BGYB50H Ecology
BGYB51H Evolutionary Biology
BGYB52H Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Lab
EESB03H Principles of Climatology
EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
EESB05H Principles of Soil Science

Year 3:
EESC04H Biodiversity and Biogeography
STAB22H Statistics
1.0 FCE from the following:
BGYC57H Evolutionary and Applied Biology of Insects
BGYC63H Conservation Biology
BGYC65H Environmental Toxicology
CHMB55H Environmental Chemistry
EESB09H Biotechnology - Environmental Implications
EESC30H Microbial Biogeochemistry

Water Science Stream

Advisor: A.G. Price (416-287-7327)
Total Requirements: 8.0 FCE
Year 1:
EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science
EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth
BGYA01H Introductory Biology: Part I
BGYA02H Introductory Biology: Part II
EESA07H Water

Year 2:
EESB02H Principles of Geomorphology
EESB03H Principles of Climatology
EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
BGYB50H Ecology

Year 3:
EESC03H Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
EESC07H Groundwater
EESC13H Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing
[EESC18H The Great Lakes: A Lacustrine System
or
EESC19H] Marine Systems
EESC31H Glacial Sedimentology and Stratigraphy

1.0 FCE from the following:
BGYC53H Marine Biology
BGYC65H Environmental Toxicology
BGYD51H River Ecology
CLAB05H The Mediterranean World I: Greece
CLAB06H The Mediterranean World II: Rome
EESD02H Contaminant Hydrogeology
EESD11H Process Hydrology

MINOR PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Supervisor of Studies/Advisor: A.G. Price (416-287-7327)
Total requirements: 4.0 FCE
The Minor Program is designed to provide insights into the basic principles of Environmental Science and its application to current environmental issues. It is intended for students with an interest in environmental issues but who do not have the necessary background for specialization in the field. It is appropriate for students pursuing a three year degree in science or those pursuing a four year degree in the social sciences or in management and economics.

Year 1:
EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science
EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth

Year 2:
Any 1.5 FCE from the following:
EESB02H Principles of Geomorphology
EESB03H Principles of Climatology
EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
EESB05H Principles of Soil Science
EESB15H Earth History

Year 3:
1.5 FCE of any other EES courses of which 1.0 FCE must be at the C- or D-level.

SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN LIBERAL SCIENCES

(See the Physical Sciences Scarborough section of this Calendar.)

EESA01H3 Introduction to Environmental Science
The scientific method and its application to natural systems. The physical and biological processes which drive ecosystem functions. Anthropogenic changes in ecosystem functions at local and global scales. Emphasis on the degradation of the atmosphere, soil, water and biological resources caused by human activity. Renewable and non-renewable resource sustainability.

EESA05H3 Environmental Hazards
An investigation of the geological background and possible solutions to major hazards in the environment.
   Environmental hazards to be studied include: landslides, erosion, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts, flooding, glaciation, future climate change, subsidence, and the disposal of toxic wastes. Of interest to a wide range of students in the life, social, and physical sciences; an opportunity for the non-specialist to understand headline-making geological events of topical interest. No prior knowledge of the Earth Sciences is required.
Exclusion: GLG103H, (GLGA03H)

EESA06H3 Introduction to Planet Earth
This course explores the composition, structure and origin of the Earth and the physical and biological processes that operate in and on it; the history of the Earth as revealed in the rock record. The flows of energy and mass through natural systems, and the impact of human activity on system processes, with particular reference to land use change, soil degradation and atmospheric pollution.
Exclusion: (EESA02H), (EESA03H), (GGRA05H), GGR100Y, GLG110H, (GLG140H), (GLG141H), (JGF150Y), (JGG150Y)

EESA07H3 Water
This course consists of a survey of the planet's water resources and the major issues facing the use of water. Topics include: Earth, the watery planet; water, the last great resource; Canada's waters; Ontario's waters; water and man; water contamination; and protecting our waters. Case studies such as the Walkerton tragedy will be studied. No prior knowledge of environmental science is required.

EESA08H3 GIS for the Beginning Student
The application of Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques and analysis is expanding across a wide spectrum of fields – from scientific modeling through environmental impacts to use in business planning. This course explains the basic functionality and structure of GIS and how it deals with spatial information. In-class labs will be drawn from various fields. No previous computing experience, other than that of using a web browser, is required – students will be using a web-based GIS.
Exclusions: Any other GIS course, e.g. (SOSA01H), EESC03H

EESA09H3 Air
A survey of current air quality and meteorological issues. Topics include air pollution, urban smog, acid rain, urban heat island, global warming and severe weather. Material will focus on a description of each issue and mitigation efforts employed. No prior knowledge of environmental science is required.
EESA10H3 Human Health and the Environment
Because of pollution, our surroundings are becoming increasingly hazardous to our health. The past century has seen intense industrialization characterized by the widespread production and use of chemicals and the intentional and unintentional disposal of a wide range of waste materials. This course explores the relationship between the incidence of disease in human populations and the environmental pollution. Emphasis will be placed on understanding where and what pollutants are produced, how they are taken up by humans and their long term effects on health; the role of naturally-occurring carcinogens will also be examined. The course will include a view of risk assessment and toxicology using case studies. No prior knowledge of environmental or medical science is required.

EESA11H3 Environmental Pollution
This course illustrates the environmental effects of urban expansion, changing methods of agriculture, industrialization, recreation, resource extraction, energy needs and the devastation of war. Drawing on information from a wide spectrum of topics – such as waste disposal, tourism, the arctic, tropical forests and fisheries – it demonstrates what we know about how pollutants are produced, the pathways they take through the global environment and how we can measure them. The course will conclude with an examination of the state of health of Canada's environments highlighting areas where environmental contamination is the subject of public discussion and concern. No prior knowledge of environmental science is required.

EESB02H3 Principles of Geomorphology
The physical and chemical processes responsible for the development of regolith at the surface of the earth and the mechanics of entrainment, transport and deposition of mass by rivers, wind, glaciers, water waves, gravitational stresses, etc., which control the evolution of surface morphology.
   Field excursions and laboratory exercises will allow students to apply theory to natural systems and to understand the dynamics of one man-modified geomorphic system.
Exclusion: (GGRB19Y)
Prerequisite: EESA06H, (EESA02H), (GGRA05H)

EESB03H3 Principles of Climatology
This is an overview of the physical and dynamic nature of meteorology, climatology and related aspects of oceanography. Major topics include: atmospheric composition, nature of atmospheric radiation, atmospheric moisture and cloud development, atmospheric motion including air masses, front formation and upper air circulation, weather forecasting, ocean circulation, climate classification, climate change theory and global warming.
Exclusion: GGR203H, GGR312H, (GGRB03Y)
Prerequisite: EESA06H or (EESA02H) or (GGRA05H) or an A-level science course with permission of the instructor.

EESB04H3 Principles of Hydrology
The water and energy balances; fluxes through natural systems. Process at the drainage basin scale: precipitation, evaporation, evapotranspiration and streamflow generation. The measurement of water fluxes, forecasting of rainfall and streamflow events. Human activity and change in hydrologic processes.
Exclusions: (GGRC28Y), (GGRC38H), GGR206H.
Prerequisite: EESA01H or EESA06H or any B-level EES course.

EESB05H3 Principles of Soil Science
A study of the processes of pedogenesis and the development of diverse soil profiles, their field relationships and their response to changing environmental conditions.
   An examination of the fundamental soil properties of importance in soil management. An introduction to the techniques of soil examination in the field, soil analysis in the laboratory and the basic principles of soil classification.
Exclusion: (GGRC27Y), (GGRB35H)
Prerequisite: Any A-level course in Environmental Science or IDSB02H

EESB09H3 Biotechnology - Environmental Implications
An examination of the environmental implications of the applications of recent advances in biotechnology. Fundamental biotechnological techniques are explained, followed by an examination of current applications and the potential ecological effects of these applications. Topics covered include bioremediation, biomass conversion, the manufacture of biological control agents, and the genetic engineering of crop plants, fish and other aquaculture species, and livestock, and wildlife forensics.
Prerequisite: [BGYA01H & BGYA02H] or (EESA04H)
Recommended Background: BGYB50H

EESB15H3 Earth History
Planet Earth is at least 4,400 million years old and a geological record exists for at least the last 3,900 million years in the form of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The changing dynamics of convection deep within the Earth's mantle and associated super-continent assembly and breakup along with meteorite impacts, are now recognized as the major controls on development of the planet's atmosphere, oceans, biology, climate and geo-chemical cycles. This course reviews this long history and the methods and techniques used by geologists to identify ancient environments.
Prerequisite: [EESA01H & EESA06H] or permission of the instructor

EESC03H3 Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
This course focuses on the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) for solving a range of scientific problems in the environmental sciences and describing their relationship with – and applicability to – other fields of study (e.g. geography, computer science, engineering, geology, ecology and biology). Topics include (but are not limited to): spatial data types, formats and organization; geo-referencing and coordinate systems; remotely sensed image manipulation and analysis; map production.
Prerequisites: EESA06H & 1.5 FCEs in B- or C-level EES courses.
Recommended: A prior introductory GIS course, e.g. EESA08H (GIS for the Beginning Student) and some experience with the use of computers (Windows or Unix-based.)

EESC04H3 Biodiversity and Biogeography
Theoretical and practical aspect of the evolution of organismal diversity in a functional context; examination of species distributions and how these are organized for scientific study. Emphasis will be on the highly diverse invertebrate animals. Topics include biomes, dispersal, adaptation, speciation, extinction, and the influence of climate history and humans.
Prerequisite: BGYB50H or (BGYB50Y) or permission of the instructor

EESC07H3 Groundwater
Groundwater represents the world's largest and most important fresh water resource.
   This basic course in hydrogeology introduces the principles of groundwater flow and aquifer storage and shows how a knowledge of these fundamental tools is essential for effective groundwater resource management and protection. Special emphasis is placed on the practical methods of resource exploration and assessment; examples of the approach are given for aquifers under environmental stress in southern Ontario, the US and Africa.
Prerequisite: EESA06H & 1 FCE in B-level EES courses

EESC13H3 Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing
To familiarize students with the relevant legislation, qualitative and quantitative approaches and applications for environmental impact assessments and environmental auditing. The focus will be on the assessment of impacts to the natural environment, however, socio-economic impacts will also be discussed. Environmental auditing and environmental certification systems will be discussed in detail. Examples and case studies from forestry, wildlife biology and land use will be used to illustrate the principles and techniques presented in the course. Students will acquire “hands-on” experience in impact assessment and environmental auditing through case studies.
Exclusions: GGR393H, (INI220Y), GGRC41H
Prerequisites: 2.5 FCE of EES courses or permission of the instructor

EESC15H3 Research Seminar in Environmental Science
Concepts and methods developed in Environmental Science will be applied to practical environmental problems, within the framework of individual or group projects; a research proposal and a research seminar will be produced. The course is also designed to ensure interaction between students from disparate streams of environmental science through participation in joint seminars with faculty and with environmental practitioners from the community at large.
Prerequisite: Permission of co-ordinator

EESC16H3 Field Camp I
Many environmental problems can only be assessed by collecting geological and other environmental data in the field. This course will provide students with the necessary skills for fieldwork investigations in a range of environments. The camp will be held in Arizona in May 2005.
Prerequisite: EESB15H and permission of the instructors.

EESC18H3 The Great Lakes: A Lacustrine System
North America is endowed with eight of the twelve largest fresh-water lakes in the world. The hydrodynamics and hydraulics of the Canadian Great Lakes are used as examples from large lacustrine systems. Fundamental concepts in physical limnology are related to features found in the Great Lakes. Topics include: classification and origin of lakes, temperature structure, seasonal circulation, heat budgets, Langmuir circulation, seiches, waves and water levels. Morphological forms and morphodynamical behaviour as a result of sediment transport process are examined particularly with respect to coastal processes.
Exclusion: (EESC05H)
Prerequisite: EESB02H
Recommended Course: EESB03H

EESC19H3 Marine Systems
The world's oceans constitute more than 70% of the earth's surface environments. This course will introduce students to the dynamics of ocean environments, ranging from the deep ocean basins to marginal seas to the coastal ocean. The large-scale water circulation is examined from an observationally based water mass analysis and from a theoretical hydro-dynamical framework. The circulation of marginal seas, the role of tides, waves and other currents are studied in terms of their effects upon the coastal boundary.
Exclusion: (EESC14H)
Prerequisite: EESB03H
Recommended Course: EESB02H

EESC21H3 Urban Environmental Problems of the Greater Toronto Area
Urban areas such at the GTA are the focus of many acute environmental problems such as the disposal of solid and liquid wastes, and the contamination of soil, air and water by industrial activity. Specific cases of such problems drawn from the GTA will be reviewed, with reference to field investigations, environmental audits, due diligence and liability, and remedial solutions. Students will carry out their own field investigations and will report on
specific issues, paying particular regard to government legislation and guidelines issued by regulatory agencies. This course is essential to students in the environmental science Program, but is also directly relevant to business and management students.
Exclusion: (EESD08H)
Prerequisites: 10 FCEs in an EES Program, or permission of the instructor.

EESC24H3 Advanced Readings in Environmental Science
An advanced supervised readings course which can be taken in any session. Students will follow structured independent readings in any area of Environmental Science. A description of the objectives and scope of the individual offering must be approved by the Discipline Representative and the Supervisor of Studies. Two papers are required in the course; they will be graded by the supervisor and one other faculty member. The course may not be used as a substitute for EES Program requirements.
Prerequisites: A minimum GPA of 2.5, and 3 FCEs in EES courses. Permission of the Supervisor of Studies and Discipline Representative.

EESC30H3 Microbial Biogeochemistry
This course examines the diversity of microorganisms, their adaptations to special habitats, and their role in the ecosystem and geochemical cycling. Other topics include microbial phylogeny, physiological diversity, species interactions and state of the art methods of detection and enumeration.
Exclusion: (BGYC55H)
Prerequisites: [CHMA10H & CHMA11H or (CHMA02Y)] and [BGYB50H & BGYB51H or (BGYB50Y)]

EESC31H3 Principles of Glacial Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
The last 2.5 million years has seen the repeated formation of large continental ice sheets over North America and Europe. The landscape of Ontario is a fossil landscape inherited from the last Laurentide Ice Sheet that disappeared only 10,000 years ago; much of southern Ontario is buried by glacial sediments and the Great Lakes are the direct result of glaciation. The course will review the cause of glaciations and their geological and geomorphological effects paying special regard to the long record of past glacial and interglacial climates preserved in the Toronto region.
Exclusion: (GLG301H), (GLGB02H)
Prerequisite: EESA06H or (EESA03H)

EESD02H3 Contaminant Hydrogeology
Natural hydrochemical processes; the use of major ions, minor ions, trace metals and environmental isotopes in studying the occurrence and nature of ground water flow. Point and non-point sources of ground water contamination and the mechanisms of contaminant transport.
Prerequisite: CHMB55H and at least 1 FCE in Environmental Science at the C-level.

EESD06H3 Climate Change Impact Assessment
Climate change over the last 150 years is reviewed by examining the climate record using both direct measurements and proxy data. Projection of future climate is reviewed using the results of sophisticated climate modeling. The climate change impact assessment formalism is introduced and applied to several examples. Students will acquire practical experience in climate change impact assessment through case studies.
Exclusion: (GGRD06H)
Prerequisite: EESB03H, (GGRB03Y)

EESD07H3 Field Camp II
This field camp will familiarize students with several geological settings and modern environments. The camp will be held in Arizona in May 2005 in conjunction with EESC16H.
Prerequisite: EESC16H and permission of the instructors

EESD09H3
EESD10Y3 Research Project in Environmental Science
The design, implementation, and reporting of a substantial research project involving laboratory and/or fieldwork. Existing faculty research allows a broad range of possible topics. The course should be undertaken after the end of the 3rd Year, subject to faculty availability. Faculty permission and supervision is required; open only to those students who have either completed or are undertaking specialist courses in the area of intended study. Students having a B+ or higher standing may be eligible for summer financial support from research projects. Permission of the co-ordinator must be obtained.
Exclusions: GLG470Y, GLG471H, (GGRD01Y), (GLGD02H), (GLGD03Y)
Prerequisite: EESC15H

EESD11H3 Process Hydrology
The motion of water at the hillslope and drainage basin scales. The relationship between surface and subsurface hydrological processes. Soil hydrologic processes emphasising infiltration. Streamflow generation mechanisms, hydrometric and isotopic research methods. Problems of physically based and empirical modelling of hydrological processes. Snowmelt energetics and modelling.
Exclusion: (GGRC28Y), (GGRD07H)
Prerequisites: EESB04H or (GGRC38H) or (GGRB09H)

EESD15H3 Cleaning up our Mess: Remediation of Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments
This course consists of a study of the ways in which hazardous organic and inorganic materials can be removed or attenuated in natural systems. The theory behind various technologies, with an emphasis on bioremediation techniques and their success in practice. An introduction to the unique challenges associated with the remediation of surface and ground water environments, soils, marine systems, and contaminated sediments.
Prerequisite: BGYA01H & BGYA02H & EESB04H & EESB05H & CHMB55H

EESD32H3 Contaminant Fate in Terrestrial Environments
This course will present fundamental chemical concepts and reactions that occur in soils with emphasis on contaminant behaviour. Students will learn the basics of soil chemistry and how these processes relate to quantities, attenuation, sequestration, and movement of ions, heavy metals, and organic molecules in terrestrial environments.
Prerequisites: CHMB55H & EESB05H

IMCB01H3 Microbiology Basics
Basic principles of microbiology including study of microscopic organisms (bacteria, viruses, protozoans, algae, and fungi), the isolation, cultivation and identification of microbes, host-parasite relationships as they relate to disease, microbial and molecular genetics, growth and control of microbes, and the human immune response to microbes.  Limited to students in the Joint Program in Industrial Microbiology or the Joint Program in Environmental Science and Technology.
Exclusions: BGYC17H, MBY377H, (MBY375Y)
Prerequisites: BGYA01H & BGYA02H

STEB07H3 Analytical Chemistry and Applications
Quantitative analysis with pharmaceutical precision and accuracy to industrial and environmental protocols. Standard wet chemistry and instrumental techniques, data analysis and presentation. Conformity with health, safety and environmental regulatory requirements. Limited to students enrolled in the Joint Specialist Program in Environmental Science and Technology or the Joint Specialist Program in Industrial Microbiology
Exclusion: CHMC11H, CHMB16H.
Prerequisites: IMCB03H or CHMA11H and permission of instructor
Note: CHMC11H or CHMB16H may be taken after STEB07H, but STEB07H cannot be taken after CHMC11H or CHMB16H

STEB21H3 Organic Chemistry and Applications
An introduction to the theory and practical applications of organic chemistry. An introduction to the principles of structure, properties identification and reactions of organic compounds as related to biology and other areas of science. Enrolment is limited to students enrolled in the Joint Specialist program in Environmental Science and Technology.
Prerequisites: CHMA11H
Exclusion: CHMB41H & CHMB42H. Note: CHMB41H and CHMB42H may be taken after STEB21H, but STEB21H may not be taken after CHMB41H or CHMB42H.

STEB40H3 Applied Environmental Microbiology
The principles of Environmental Biology: water, air and soil testing procedures. Analysis of contaminated and spiked samples using Ministry of Environment and Industry standards, procedures and protocols. Limited to students enrolled in the Joint Specialist program in Environmental Science and Technology
Prerequisites: BGYA02H and IMCB01H

STEB42H3 Water Quality Control
The characteristics of raw water and wastewater, water supply systems, sources of supply, methods of treatment, alternative sources of water and methods of distribution. The disposal of wastewater, the collection system and sewage treatment methods. Limited to students enrolled in the Joint Specialist program in Environmental Science and Technology

STEB43H3 Engineering Equipment and Processes
Energy and mass in engineering systems, hydrostatics, fluid flow, Bernoulli's theorem. Pumping systems, head losses through hydraulic systems, the efficiency of pumps and motors. Process equipment systems with emphasis on pumps, pipes and valves. Limited to students enrolled in the Joint Specialist program in Environmental Science and Technology
Prerequisites: PHYA10H3

STEB44H3 Environmental Legislation and Regulations
The concepts of law and legal process as they apply in Canada. The Ontario Environmental Protection Act and other environmental legislation. Research on selected Canadian statutes with a written report and oral presentation. Limited to students enrolled in the Joint Specialist program in Environmental Science and Technology
Exclusions: (EESC28H)

STEC11H3 Applied Microbiological Analysis
The basic principles of Environmental Microbiology, immunology, molecular biology and genetics and toxicity testing using microorganisms. Laboratories are performed using current Ministry of Environment methodologies. Limited to students enrolled in the Joint Specialist program in Environmental Science and Technology
Prerequisite: STEB40H

STEC15H3 Applied Analytical Instrumentation
The theory and practices of chemical sampling and analysis used by the Ministry of Environment and Energy. The emphasis will be on the analysis of environmental samples using MOEE procedures and College equipment. Limited to students enrolled in the Joint Specialist program in Environmental Science and Technology
Prerequisites: CHMA11H & STEB07H
Exclusions: CHMC16H  Note: STEC15H may not be taken after CHMC16H, but CHMC16H may be taken after STEC15H.

STEC53H3 Environmental Audits, Sampling and Data Management
Ministry approved Industrial Auditing protocols. The presentation and manipulation of graphs, spreadsheets and tests, using popular software titles. The ISO series, with emphasis on EMS and ISO 14001. Limited to students enrolled in the Joint Specialist program in Environmental Science and Technology
Exclusions: EESC13H3

STEC60H3 Applied Hydrology and Spills Management
The movement of water in its natural state; techniques to measure and control the flow of surface and subsurface water. Current techniques to prevent contamination of subsurface water and surface water by chemical spills. Limited to students enrolled in the Joint Specialist program in Environmental Science and Technology
Prerequisites: EESB04H & STEB42H

STEC61H3 Hazardous Wastes and Modern Industrial Processes
Each student will be assigned research on a different pollutant, which might be one of the following: heavy metal ions in water, mercury, aromatic solvents, polymeric resins, PCB's, halogenated solvents, organic acids, Freon or pesticides. Limited to students enrolled in the Joint Specialist program in Environmental Science and Technology
Prerequisites: CHMA11H & STEB21H & STEB07H

UTSC LOGO Calendar 2004-2005
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