University of Toronto at Scarborough 2002/2003 Calendar
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Sociology

(B.A.)

Faculty List

W.W. Isajiw, B.A. (LaSalle), M.A., Ph.D. (Catholic Univ. of America), Professor Emeritus
J. Hannigan, B.A., M.A. (Western Ontario), Ph.D. (Ohio State), Professor
R. O'Toole, B.A. (Leeds), PGCE (London), M.A. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Toronto) Professor
J. Tanner, B.Sc. (Hons.) (London) PGCE (Leicester), M.A., Ph.D. (Alberta) Professor
M. Hammond, B.A. (California), M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Associate Professor
P-C. Hsiung, B.A. (National Chun-sing University), M.A. (Chinese Cultural University), M.A. (UCLA), Ph.D. (UCLA), Associate Professor
A. Sev'er, B.A., M.A. (Windsor), Ph.D. (York, Canada), Associate Professor
S. Ungar, B.A. (McGill), M.A., Ph.D. (York, Canada), Associate Professor
R.B. Bernard, B.A. (York), M.A. (McGill), Ph.D. (UCLA), Assistant Professor
J. Hermer, B.A. (Western), M.A. (Carleton), D.Phil. (Oxon.), Assistant Professor
P. Landolt, B.A., M.A. (York), M.A., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Assistant Professor

Discipline Representative: J. Tanner (416-287-7293)

Sociology is the scientific study of interaction among people, the social relations which they establish, and the social groups which they form. Sociology attempts to explain how society is ordered, how it functions, and what accounts for social cohesion, social stratification, social mobility, and social change. It studies the consequences of co-operation, competition, and conflict.

Students may wish to take Sociology courses as a part of a general education, in anticipation of the usefulness of certain courses in future occupations or professions, or as part of a Specialist, Major or Minor Program.

The introductory course, SOCA01, is intended to familiarize students with the distinctive theories, methods and questions of sociology as a part of a liberal education. In addition, the SOCA01 course provides a minimum background of knowledge about sociology, and hence is a prerequisite to all of the more advanced courses.

Students who want to learn about certain areas of sociology which may be useful in later occupational situations may consult faculty advisors who are prepared to assist them in course selection. There are no formal requirements for these special areas and they will not be designated on diplomas.

The faculty advisers for special areas of concentration are:
Social Work Prof. A. Sev'er
Urban Studies Prof. J. Hannigan
Education Prof. J. Tanner
PLANNING A PROGRAM IN SOCIOLOGY
Students are obliged to take required courses in the Major and Specialist Programs as early in their careers as possible. For example, SOCB01, SOCB03 and SOCB06 should be taken during the second year, and SOCC05 should be taken during the third year. Failure to do so may lead to timetable conflicts and could prolong the completion of the Program. Students are reminded that they are not permitted to register in courses for which they have not completed the prerequisites indicated in the Calendar. They may only enter a course for which they lack the prerequisites by obtaining the permission of the instructor prior to registration. Instructors have the right to request removal of any student ineligible for enrollment.

SPECIALIST (CO-OPERATIVE) PROGRAM IN SOCIOLOGY

Supervisor of Studies: S. Ungar
ungar@utsc.utoronto.ca
Co-op Co-ordinator: C. Moffatt (416-287-7113)

The Co-operative Program allows students to pursue an in-depth study of Sociology combined with two four-month work terms in areas complementary to the area of study. Placements can be with research institutes, the private sector, public institutions, and non-government organizations.

This is a limited enrolment program. For information on admissions, fees, work placements, and standing in the program, please see the Calendar section Co-operative Programs: General Information, page 65.

Work Terms

In order to be eligible for placement, students must complete a minimum of 9 F.C.E., including SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y and SOCB06H and complete the Introduction to Humanities and Social Sciences Co-op Tutorial.

Course Requirements

Students must complete the requirements for the Specialist Program in Sociology (see below), with the following additional requirement:
SOCC22H Qualitative Methods in Social Research
(This course may be counted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for C- and D-level courses within the Sociology Specialist Program.

SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN SOCIOLOGY

Supervisor: S. Ungar
(416-287-7299)

The Program requires completion of ten full-course equivalents as described below. No more than fourteen full-course equivalents in Sociology may be included in a four-year degree.

  1. SOCA01Y Introduction to Sociology
  2. SOCB01Y Methods in Social Research
  3. SOCB03Y Classic Sociological Theory
  4. SOCB06H Social Statistics
  5. Two full-course equivalents at B-level in Sociology
  6. SOCC05Y Contemporary Sociological Theory
  7. One and a half full-course equivalents at C-level
  8. One full-course equivalent at D-level
  9. One other full-course equivalent in Sociology

Enrolment in the Specialist Program is limited.

Students must normally apply to enter the Program after completing 4 or 5 F.C.E. including SOCA01Y. Decisions are made on Program admissions only twice a year, in May and in August, and are based on student requests submitted to the Registrar through ROSI. Admission is determined on the basis of a student's overall GPA and grade in SOCA01Y. For students applying after 8-10 credits, admission will be on the basis of overall GPA and grades in SOC courses taken. Specialist students will be entitled to priority access to SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y and SOCB06H for fall-winter sessions, in the summer early registration period.

MAJOR PROGRAM IN SOCIOLOGY

Supervisor: S. Ungar
(416-287-7299)

The Program requires completion of seven full-course equivalents in Sociology including:

  1. SOCA01Y Introduction to Sociology
  2. SOCB01Y Methods in Social Research
  3. SOCB03Y Classic Sociological Theory
  4. SOCB06H Social Statistics
  5. Three and a half full-course equivalents in Sociology, at least one and a half of which must be at the C-level

Enrolment in the Major Program is limited.

Students must normally apply to enter the Program after completing 4 or 5 F.C.E. including SOCA01Y. Decisions are made on Program admissions only twice a year, in May and in August, and are based on student requests submitted to the Registrar through ROSI. Admission is determined on the basis of a student's overall GPA and grade in SOCA01Y. For students applying after 8-10 credits, admission will be on the basis of overall GPA and grades in SOC courses taken. Major students will be entitled to priority access to SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y and SOCB06H for fall-winter sessions, in the summer early registration period.

MINOR PROGRAM IN SOCIOLOGY

Supervisor: S. Ungar
(416-287-7299)

The Program requires completion of four full-course equivalents in Sociology including:

  1. SOCA01Y Introduction to Sociology
  2. SOCB01Y Methods in Social Research
  3. SOCB03Y Classic Sociological Theory
  4. One full-course equivalent in Sociology at the C-level

Admission to the Minor Program in Sociology is not limited. All students who apply for this Program will be admitted. However, students are warned that they are not guaranteed admission to B-level and C-level courses during winter session, and thus will be accommodated only after other Program students have been admitted to these courses. Thus some courses may be unavailable, or available only in the summer.

SOCA01Y3 Introduction to Sociology

An introduction to the basic concepts, principles and methods of sociology as a discipline for the study of society.

Major topics studied include: the nature of social groups, social processes, culture, socialization, deviant behaviour, population, community, stratification, social institutions and social change.

Two hours of lecture per week.
Exclusion: SOC101
A. Sev'er/S. Ungar/M. MacKinnon

SOCB01Y3 Methods in Social Research

The course will be divided into three basic units. It will start with a critical overview of the logic and methods of social scientific research. Topics will include the logic of research, research design and causal analysis, and methods of data collection. Once the fundamentals have been covered, an effort will be made to teach students how to "read" and critically evaluate research reports. Several studies will be examined in detail, and then students will be given the opportunity to do their own evaluations. The final goal will be to provide some practical experience in doing research. Using data sets provided by the instructor, students will be taught how to interpret tables and to employ data to test hypotheses.

Three hours of lecture per week.

Limited enrolment: 170
Exclusion: SOC200
Prerequisite: SOCA01Y
R. Bernard

SOCB03Y3 Classic Sociological Theory

This course will locate the development of sociological theories within the general frame of the history of social thought.

After a brief review of the antecedents of sociological thought in social philosophy from classical antiquity to the 18th century, the emergence of sociology is examined within the context of critical social and political changes. Special consideration is given to the works of Comte, Marx, Tocqueville, Durkheim, Weber, Simmel and Freud. The significance of their theories for contemporary developments in sociology is emphasized.

Two hours of lecture per week.

Limited enrolment: 170
Exclusion: SOC203
Prerequisite: SOCA01Y
R. O'Toole

SOCB05Y3 Urban Sociology

A review of theories of urban genesis and urban form; the interrelationship of urbanization, industrialization and modernization, issues in urban living (housing, transportation, urban-renewal, poverty, unemployment, etc.); urban social networks (ethnic and cultural heterogeneity, neighbourhood, community and other voluntary associations).

Two hours of lecture per week.
Exclusion: SOC205
Prerequisite: SOCA01Y
J. Hannigan

SOCB06H3 Social Statistics

A consideration of elementary statistics including the summarizing of data, the logic of statistical decision-making and a number of common statistical tests. Statistics is a basic tool used by sociologists. An understanding of statistics is necessary for the student who wants to become an informed reader of social research. A working knowledge of elementary algebra is required. However, the lecturer will undertake brief reviews of mathematics as the need arises. This course is intended to supplement SOCB01.

Two hours of lecture per week and a one hour tutorial per week.

Limited enrolment: 170
Exclusions: ANTC35, ECMB09, ECMB11, PSYB07, SOC201, SOC300, STAB22
Prerequisite: SOCA01Y
S. Ungar

SOCB10Y3 Social Class and Social Stratification

Description and analysis of the nature of social stratification with emphasis on the basis of stratification; different theoretical views concerning stratification; the structure and function of stratification systems, social classes and associated behaviour; social mobility; and class conflict.

Two hours of lecture per week.
Exclusion: SOC301
Prerequisite: SOCA01Y
M. Hammond

SOCB12Y3 Sociology of the Family

This course explores the family as a social institution, which shapes and at the same time is shaped by, the society in which it appears. We will study cross-cultural and historical variations in family organization. We will look at the relations between family organization and structural factors such as class, gender, and race/ethnicity. The objectives of the course are to provide students with a sociological understanding of issues related to the family, to help students develop critical skills in analyzing these issues, and to gain insights into the implications of these issues.

Two hours of lecture per week.
Exclusion: SOC214
Prerequisite: SOCA01Y
P-C Hsiung

SOCB18Y3 Sociology of Deviant Behaviour

An analysis of the social processes by which behaviour is defined and treated as criminal, immoral, disgusting, sick, or merely eccentric; the establishment and administration of sanctions, treatment and other controls; deviant subcultures; and specific categories of deviance, such as: crimes against persons, "victimless crimes"; mental illness, sexual deviation and alcoholism.

Two hours of lecture per week.
Exclusion: SOC212
Prerequisite: SOCA01Y
J. Hermer/T.B.A.

SOCB20Y3 Ethnic and Race Relations

A study of the structure and processes in a society made up of a variety of ethnic and racial groups. The focus will be on Canada. The course will study ethnic stratification, immigration, prejudice and discrimination, ethnic social mobility and ethnic conflict, assimilation and ethnic identity retention, and the problem of integration of society. Specific topics will include: conflict of generations, stereotyping, Canadian bilingualism and multiculturalism and others.

Two hours of lecture per week.
Exclusion: SOC210
Prerequisite: SOCA01Y
P. Landolt

SOCB26H3 Sociology of Education

This course examines primary, secondary and higher educational institutions in modern industrial societies. Among the topics explored are social factors in educational achievement, accessibility, school culture, the role and professional status of teachers, and knowledge and power in learning situations.
Exclusions: SOCB24, SOCB25, SOC225
Prerequisite: SOCA01Y
J. Tanner

SOCB33Y3 Sociology of Work and Industry

An introductory examination of the nature of work and people's occupational roles and behaviour in modern industrial settings.

Students will be exposed to some of the major concepts, theories and empirical research in the sociology of work and industry. Topics will include: an overview of the process of capitalist industrialization; changes in the occupational structure of the labour force; orientations to work; sources of job satisfaction and dissatisfaction, women and work, the impact of new technology; unions; employment, and unemployment; and professionalisation.

Two hours of lecture per week.
Exclusions: SOCC07, SOCC13, SOC207, SOC316, SOC317, SOC370
Prerequisite: SOCA01Y
J. Tanner

SOCC03H3 Collective Behaviour

The study of uninstitutionalized group behaviour - crowds, panics, crazes, riots and the genesis of social movements.

Two hours of lecture per week.

Limited enrolment: 60
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
J. Hermer

SOCC05Y3 Contemporary Sociological Theory

A consideration of basic questions as they arise in the work of contemporary theorists and theoretical schools of sociology. Students will be expected to develop an informed, critical perspective on current debates within the discipline.

Two hours of lecture per week.

Limited enrolment: 60
Exclusion: SOC313
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
M. Hammond

SOCC08H3 Gender and Information Technology

Examines transformations and perpetuation of gender stratification in relation to the emergence and development of information technology. It explores roles that family, ideology, state policies, and other social institutions play in the process. It also compares and contrasts effects of information technology on gender relations in the context of development and globalization. Students will develop and apply analytical skills to understand gender and information technology in everyday life.

Limited enrolment: 60
Exclusion: SOC356
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
P-C Hsiung

SOCC09H3 Sociology of Gender and Work

Explores the interaction of gender and work.

An examination of the relevance of gender to the organization and experience of paid and unpaid work. We will critically assess some of the central theoretical debates and recent research in this area of sociological inquiry. Through analysis of quantitative and qualitative research, we will specifically consider gender differences in occupational and income attainment, housework, the relation of work and family, gender and class solidarity, the construction of gender identity through occupational roles, and related topics.

Limited enrolment: 60
Exclusion: SOC366H
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y & SOCB01Y & SOCB03Y
R. Bernard

SOCC10H3 Sex, Self and Society

A sociological examination of gender as a category of analysis, research and social experience.

The single most important influence on our behaviour is being male or female. Gender is built into the way our institutions are put together, the way we are socialized, and the way access to scarce resources is structured. This course will focus on the social construction of gender, gender ideology, the impact of gender on the individual and the social structure; and the maintenance of gender inequality in the labour force, in the family, in education and in social interaction.

Two hours of lecture per week.

Limited enrolment: 60
Exclusion: SOC365
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
A. Sev'er

SOCC21Y3 Sociology of Religion

A sociological analysis of religion as a social institution.

Consideration of the problem of the definition of religion, analysis of major theoretical and empirical contributions to the field; and investigation of forms of religion in historical and contemporary contexts.

Limited enrolment: 60
Exclusions: SOCB21, SOC250, RLG210
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
R. O'Toole

SOCC25H3 Comparative Ethnic and Race Relations

A comparative study of relations between diverse ethnic and racial groups in selected societies.

The purpose of the course is to develop a critical understanding of the process of inter-group relations. The course will compare the patterns of interethnic relations in North America with those in selected European countries, Africa, Asia and Latin America.

Limited enrolment: 60
Exclusion: SOC330
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y, SOCB20Y
R. Bernard

SOCC26H3 Sociology of Urban Growth

An in-depth examination of the conditions, patterns and consequences of urban growth and development. Major topics will include the emergence of new urban institutions (legal, political, economic) and the formation and operation of urban social networks.

Two hours of lecture per week.

Limited enrolment: 60
Exclusion: SOC386
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y, SOCB05Y
J. Hannigan

SOCC29H3 Variant Family Forms

A review and sociological analysis of non-traditional family forms and innovative life styles representing departures from conventional marriage and family patterns. Included will be "singleness", "living together", androgeny as a life style, non-monogamous forms, voluntary childlessness, communes and co-operatives, and "swinging". Special reference will be made to structural and functional dimensions, role changes, special problems and community response.

Limited enrolment: 60

Two hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y, SOCB12Y
A. Se'ver

SOCC30H3 Criminal Behaviour

An advanced study of the causes and consequences of criminal behaviour, with special emphasis on Canada.

Two hours of lecture per week.

Limited enrolment: 60
Exclusions: SOC306, WDW203
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y, SOCB18Y
J. Tanner

SOCC34H3 Globalization: Causes, Consequences and Critique

Examines the post-1970's transformation of the international capitalist system and its consequences for social, economic, political, social and cultural dimensions of world society. Substantive topics include: the changing nature of global capitalism, the construction of a new regulatory regime for the capitalist markets, consequences for nation-states and citizenship, adaptive and contestatory responses to globalization.

Two hours of lecture per week.

Limited enrolment: 60
Prerequisites: (SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y SOCB03Y or IDSB01H
P. Landolt

SOCC37H3 Environment and Society

This course links studies in the classical sociology of resources and territory (as in the works of Harold Innis, S.D. Clark, and the Chicago School), with modern topics in ecology and environmentalism. The course will include empirical research, and theoretical issues, in the relationship of various social systems to their natural environments.

Limited enrolment: 60
Exclusion: SOC385
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
J. Hannigan

SOCD40H3 Supervised Independent Research

Student research by field methods, survey analysis or library or archival research. Regular supervision of data collection and analysis, culminating in a research report.

Students are advised that they must obtain consent from the supervising instructor before registering for this course.
Exclusions: SOC390, SOC391, SOC392
Prerequisites: Completion of at least fifteen full-course equivalents including SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y, SOCB06H and permission of the instructor.
S. Ungar

SOCD43H3 Advanced Seminar in Research Methods

Special topics in methodologies used in contemporary sociological research. Designed as a final year course for students taking a Specialist Program in Sociology.

Two hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y, SOCB06H, SOCC05Y
S. Ungar

SOCD44H3 Advanced Seminar on Issues in Contemporary Sociology

This course will explore a number of current issues and controversies which engage the attention of sociologists according to their sub-disciplinary specializations. It is intended to expose students to the most recent and newly emerging developments and scholarly discussions within the field. The course is designed as a final year course for students taking a Specialist Programme in Sociology.

Two hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y, SOCB06H, SOCC05Y
R. O'Toole


COURSES NOT OFFERED 2002/2003

SOCB02Y3 Sociology of Interpersonal Relations
Exclusion: SOC202
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y
SOCB04Y3 Political Sociology
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y
SOCB34Y3 Sociology of Mass Media and Communication
Exclusions: SOCB15, SOCC34
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y
SOCC02H3 Small Groups
Exclusion: SOCB07
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB02Y & SOCB03Y
SOCC04H3 Social Movements
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
SOCC11H3 Sociology of Law and Law Enforcement
Exclusions: SOC213, SOC306
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y, SOCB18Y
SOCC16H3 Sociology of Conflict and Co-operation
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
SOCC18H3 Sociology of Culture
Exclusion: SOC360
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
SOCC22H3 Qualitative Methods in Social Research
Exclusions: SOC387, SOC405
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
SOCC24H3 Changing Family Life in Canada
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Ym SOCB12Y
SOCC28H3 Sociology of Aging
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
SOCC33H3 Comparative Social Structure
Exclusion: SOCB23
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
SOCC35H3 Social Change
Exclusions: SOCB25, SOCC17
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y
SOCD42H3 Advanced Seminar in Sociological Theory
Exclusion: SOC440
Prerequisites: SOCA01Y, SOCB01Y, SOCB03Y, SOCB06H, SOCC05Y


Full Listing of Courses Not Offered

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University of Toronto at Scarborough 2002/2003 Calendar
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