University of Toronto at Scarborough 2001/2002 Calendar
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Environmental Science

(B.Sc.)

Faculty List

R. B. Bryan, B.A. (Dublin), Ph.D. (Sheffield), Professor
N. Eyles, B.Sc. (Leicester), M.Sc. (Memorial University NFLD), Ph.D. (East Anglia), D.Sc. (Leicester), Professor
B. Greenwood, B.Sc., Ph.D. (Bristol), Ph.D. Hons. Causa (Uppsala), Professor
K.W.F. Howard, B.Sc., M.Sc. Ph.D. (Birmingham), Professor
V. Timmer, B.Sc.F., M.Sc.F., (University of New Brunswick), Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor
J.A. Westgate, B.Sc. (Reading), Ph.D. (Alberta), Professor
D.D. Williams, B.Sc. (University College, North Wales), Dip. Ed. (Liverpool), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Waterloo), D.Sc. (Wales), Professor
R.R. Fulthorpe, B.Sc., M.Sc., (Toronto), Ph.D. (Carleton) Associate Professor
W.A. Gough, B.Sc., M.Sc. (Toronto), Ph.D. (McGill), Associate Professor
A.G. Price, B.Sc. (Wales), M.Sc., Ph.D. (McGill), Associate Professor
A. Mohajer, M.Sc. (Florida State), Ph.D. (London), Adjunct Associate Professor
Discipline Representative:
Until June 30, 2001
A.G. Price (416-287-7327)
July 1, 2001-June 30, 2002
N. Eyles (416-287-7231)
Human activity is a major cause of environmental change and the rate of that change has accelerated dramatically over the last century. Study of the dynamics of both natural and anthropogenic changes requires knowledge spanning many scientific disciplines. Recent environmental degradation such as surface and subsurface water pollution, air and soil pollution, climate change, depletion of resources, extinction of species and problems of waste disposal are all a result of the lack of understanding of environmental systems and processes. Environmental degradation has an impact not only on human beings but on all species and most natural systems, so that its understanding requires approaches and skills from many areas such as biology, chemistry, geology, geography, mathematics, physics, and ecology.

A Specialist Program with three Streams, a Major Program, a Minor Program and, in addition, a Co-op Specialist Program are all available within Environmental Science. The three specialist streams are: Environmental Geosciences, Environmental Biology and Environmental Chemistry. The Major Program is designed for students who wish to pursue either another Major or Specialist Program in a related discipline. All streams have a large common core in the first two years; this reflects the strong interdisciplinary requirements of an integrated approach to the study of the environment and allows students to switch between streams if they wish.

The overall purpose of the various programs in Environmental Science is to provide education and training which will produce highly qualified scientists with excellent field and laboratory experience, with a view to future employment in consulting, government research operations, regulatory agencies, non-governmental environmental and development organizations and research and teaching.

SPECIALIST (CO-OP) PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Supervisor of Studies: W.A. Gough (416-287-7245)

Co-op Co-ordinator: R. Louden (416-287-7254)

The Co-operative Program allows students to take any one of three specialist streams in Environmental Science. Each of these streams has a strong basis in the fundamental sciences such as biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics, but emphasizes the environmental sciences such as geology, geography, atmospheric sciences and ecology. The Program is broadly based for the practicing environmental scientist and including study in the areas of: Environmental Law; Environmental Impact Assessment; Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems; Scientific Computing; Statistics. One of the thrusts of the specialist Program is the importance of field and laboratory work, which allows students the opportunity to develop skills which are directly useful in the work place.

The three work placements are integral to the Co-op experience; students will be required to undertake 16-week periods of work placement in positions fitting their interests and skills and future employment intentions. Assistance will be provided by the Co-ordinator in securing appropriate placements.

Admission to the Program

Applicants may apply to the Program directly from secondary school or may apply as transfer students from college or first-year university. The timing of work placements for students who receive transfer credit will depend upon the particular university courses completed. Applicants must indicate the special code for this University of Toronto at Scarborough Program on the Application for Admission to an Ontario University. Once the University of Toronto is notified of the application, candidates are sent information on how to download the co-op supplementary application from our admissions website. To be considered for the first round of selection, applicants must return the co-op supplementary form by March 1; the final deadline is April 1. Therefore it is essential that applicants submit the initial OUAC application at least six weeks prior to these dates.

Note that enrollment in the Program is limited. Admission is considered on the basis of the applicant's academic performance, background or experience in relevant subjects, and a letter of reference from high school teacher or university instructor in mathematics or science. An interview is required.

Fees

Every student in a co-operative Program is required to pay additional fees as established by the University of Toronto.

SPECIALIST (CO-OP) PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

This Program requires twenty F.C.E.'s (four years) of study. For students who enter the Program in 2001/2002 or later, three work terms must be completed along with the academic Program. For students who entered before 2001/2002, the requirement is two work terms, with an optional third work term with permission of the Co-ordinator. To be eligible for their work term, students must be in good standing and must have completed at least 7.5 F.C.E.'s. Work placement opportunities are arranged by the Physical Sciences Division, but must be won by students in competition with all applicants for the position.

Performance on work terms will be evaluated by the employer and coordinator. Students must submit a report for each work term (including a third work term if taken).

To maintain standing in the Program, to be eligible for a work term and to receive specialist certification upon graduation, a student must:

For Program outlines, please refer to the description of the Specialist Program in Environmental Science below. Note that while it is strongly encouraged, courses need not be taken in exactly the indicated order, but if an alternative ordering is adopted, care must be taken to ensure that prerequisites are satisfied and conflicts avoided.

NOTE: Each student's program requires the annual approval of the supervisor of studies. Students are individually responsible for ensuring that they have completed all Program and degree requirements for graduation.

Introduction to Environmental Science Co-op

During their first year, students will participate in a co-op tutorial. This is designed to prepare students for their work term experience and is crucial for ensuring that students get the most benefit from their co-op placement learning opportunities. The tutorial will cover a variety of topics that will help students to develop the skills and tools they require to secure placements that best match their interests. Students will gain insights into trends in the industry as well as research opportunities. The tutorial will consist of presentations, hands-on activities and group exercises. This tutorial is in addition to the 20 full-course degree requirement. There are no additional fees associated with this tutorial.

Successful completion of this tutorial is a prerequisite for the co-op work terms (COPC05H).

COPC05H Environmental Science Co-op Work Term

Work terms are an integral part of the co-op curriculum. Practical work experience in a related field is alternated with study terms to enhance academic studies and develop professional and personal skills. Work term reports are required at the completion of each work term. Continuation in a co-op Program is based on a student's ability to meet both the academic and work term requirements. To be eligible for work terms, students must be in good standing and must have completed at least 7.5 F.C.E.'s. Students are permitted to take only one summer work term. Students are expected to take summer courses either in the year preceding or following their non-summer work term. Course credit of 0.5 F.C.E. is granted for each four month period. Work term credits are in addition to the 20 full-course degree requirements and are graded on a Credit, No Credit systems. There are no additional course fees for work terms.

SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Supervisor of Studies: W. Gough (416-287-7245)

This Program has a firm base in the traditional environmental disciplines, that is, the earth, atmospheric and ecological sciences, but is built on an excellent grounding in the fundamental sciences of biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics. The acquisition of practical skills through extensive field and laboratory experience is emphasized. The Program is integrated in nature with a common core extending through all years of each of three specialist streams: Environmental Geoscience, and two more narrowly based studies of Environmental Biology and Environmental Chemistry.

A list of suggestions for elective courses can be obtained from the Supervisor of Studies.

Environmental Geosciences Stream

Advisor: W. Gough (416-287-7245)

Total requirements: 14.0 F.C.E.

Year 1:


EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science
EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth
BGYA01Y Introductory Biology
CHMA02Y General Chemistry
PHYA10H The Physics of Classical Systems
and
MATA26Y Calculus
or
MATA29Y Introduction to Mathematical Modeling

Year 2:


BGYB50Y Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
CSCA57H Introduction to Scientific Computing
STAB22H Statistics
CHMB55H Environmental Chemistry
and 2 F.C.E.'s from the following:
EESB01H Principles of Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
EESB02H Principles of Geomorphology
EESB03H Principles of Climatology
EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
EESB05H Principles of Soil Science
EESB14H Earth Materials

Year 3:

EESC03H Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems
EESC04H Biodiversity and Biogeography
EESC07H Groundwater
EESC13H Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing
EESC15H Research Seminar

and 0.5 F.C.E.'s from the following:

EESC19H Marine Systems

EESC18H The Great Lakes

Year 4:

1.0 F.C.E. from the following:

EESC21H Urban Environmental Problems of the Greater Toronto Area
EESD02H Contaminant Hydrogeology
EESD06H Climate Change
EESD09H Research Project in Environmental Science
EESD10Y Research Project in Environmental Science
EESD11H Process Hydrology
and 1.0 F.C.E. from any other EES courses

Environmental Biology Stream

Advisor: D.D. Williams (416-287-7423)

Total requirements: 13.5 F.C.E.

Year 1:


EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science
EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth
BGYA01Y Introductory Biology
CHMA02Y General Chemistry

MATA29Y Introduction to Mathematical Modeling

or

MATA26Y Calculus

PHYA10H The Physics of Classical Systems

Year 2:


BGYB50Y Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
BGYB52H Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Laboratory
STAB22H Statistics
CSCA57H Introduction to Scientific Computing

and 1.0 F.C.E. from the following:
EESB03H Principles of Climatology
EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
EESB05H Principles of Soil Science
CHMB55H Environmental Chemistry

Year 3:

EESC03H Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems
EESC04H Biodiversity and Biogeography
EESC15H Research Seminar in Environmental Science
EESC30H Microbial Biogeochemistry
BGYC58H Advanced Population Ecology
BGYC61H Advanced Community Ecology
BGYC63H Conservation Biology

and 0.5 F.C.E. from the following:
BGYC56H Limnology
BGYC57H Evolutionary and Applied Biology of Insects
BGYC65H Environmental Toxicology

Year 4:


EESC13H Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing
and 0.5 F.C.E. from the following:
EESD14H Contaminants in Terrestrial Environments
EESD15H Cleaning Up Our Mess: Remediation of Environments
EESC23H Late Cenozoic Environments
EESD06H Climate Change

and 0.5 F.C.E. from the following:
BGYC52H Ecology Field Course
BGYC53H Marine Biology
BGYD51H River Ecology
BGYC67H Inter-University Advanced Field Ecology

Strongly recommended:
BGYD01Y Supervised Study in Environmental Biology
or
EESD10Y Research Project in Environmental Science

Environmental Chemistry Stream

Advisor: J. Donaldson (416-287-7213)

Total requirements: 15.0 F.C.E.

Year 1:


EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science
EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth
BGYA01Y Introductory Biology
CHMA02Y General Chemistry
PHYA10H Dynamics of Classical Systems
and
MATA26Y Calculus
or
MATA29Y Introduction to Mathematical Modeling

Year 2:


BGYB50Y Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
CSCA57H Introduction to Scientific Programming
STAB22H Statistics
CHMB55H Environmental Chemistry
CHMB16H Techniques in Analytical Chemistry
CHMB31H Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry

and 1.0 F.C.E. from the following:
EESB03H Principles of Climatology
EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
EESB05H Principles of Soil Science

Year 3:

EESC03H Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems
EESC13H Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing
EESC15H Research Seminar
EESC07H Groundwater
CHMB22Y Introduction to Physical Chemistry
CHMB44Y Organic Chemistry I

Year 4:

EESD02H Contaminant Hydrogeology

EESD14H Contaminants in Terrestrial Ecosystems

CHMC11H Principles of Analytic Instrumentation

and 0.5 F.C.E. from the following:
CHMC21H Topics in Biophysical Chemistry
CHMC31H Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry
CHMC41H Intermediate Organic Chemistry
CHMC47H Bio-Organic Chemistry

MAJOR PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Advisor: A.G. Price (416-287-7327)

Total requirements: 7.0 F.C.E.

The Major Program is designed to provide an excellent background in the basic principles of Environmental Science and its application to current environmental issues. It is intended for students with an interest in environmental issues but who do not wish to specialize in the field. It is appropriate for students pursuing a three year degree or those pursuing a four year degree with more than one area of specialization (e.g. Biology, Chemistry, Physics, International Development Studies, Society and Environment).

Year 1:

EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science

EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth

BGYA01Y Introductory Biology

Year 2:


EESB01H Principles of Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
EESB02H Principles of Geomorphology
EESB03H Principles of Climatology
EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
EESB05H Principles of Soil Science
and
STAB22H Statistics
or
CSCA57H Introduction to Scientific Computing

Year 3:

EESC03H Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems

EESC13H Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing

BGYB50Y Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

MINOR PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Advisor: A.G. Price (416-287-7327)

Total requirements: 4.0 F.C.E.

The Minor Program is designed to provide insights into the basic principles of Environmental Science and its application to current environmental issues. It is intended for students with an interest in environmental issues but who do not have the necessary background for specialization in the field. It is appropriate for students pursuing a three year degree in science or those pursuing a four year degree in the social sciences or in management and economics.

Year 1:

EESA01H Introduction to Environmental Science

EESA06H Introduction to Planet Earth

Year 2:


Any 1.5 F.C.E. from the following:
EESB01H Principles of Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
EESB02H Principles of Geomorphology
EESB03H Principles of Climatology
EESB04H Principles of Hydrology
EESB05H Principles of Soil Science

Year 3:

1.5 F.C.E. of any other EES courses of which 1.0 F.C.E. must be at the C- or D-level.

EESA01H3 Introduction to Environmental Science

An introduction to the physical and biological processes which underlie the way in which ecosystems function, from local to global scales. The scientific method and its application to the investigation of natural systems. An examination of the ways in which human activity has modified the ways in which natural systems function. Human history and development and the role of changes in societal attitudes (paradigms) in determining the rates of human-induced environmental change. Particular emphasis on degradation of the atmosphere, soils, water and biological resources resulting from human activity; population growth, soil erosion, climate change, loss of biodiversity; renewable and non-renewable resource utilization; sustainability.

Two hour lecture every week and a two hour practical every other week.

A.G. Price

EESA05H3 Environmental Hazards

An investigation of the geological background and possible solutions to major hazards in the environment.

Environmental hazards to be studied include: landslides, erosion, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts, flooding, glaciation, future climate change, subsidence, and the disposal of toxic wastes. Of interest to a wide range of students in the life, social, and physical sciences; an opportunity for the non-specialist to understand headline-making geological events of topical interest. No prior knowledge of the Earth Sciences is required. Two hour lecture per week.

Exclusion: GLG103 (GLGA03)

Faculty

EESA06H3 Introduction to Planet Earth

The composition, structure and origin of the Earth and the physical and biological processes that operate in and on it; the history of the Earth as revealed in the rock record.

The flows of energy and mass through natural systems, and the impact of human activity on system processes, with particular reference to land use change, soil degradation and atmospheric pollution.

Two hour lecture every week and a two hour practical every other week.

Exclusion: (EESA02), (EESA03), GGRA05, GGR100, GLG110, 140, 141, JFG150

N. Eyles/A.G. Price

EESB01H3 Principles of Sedimentology and Stratigraphy

An analysis of the wide range of sedimentary environments found on planet earth and their stratigraphic record over the last 3500 million years. Techniques for describing and dating sedimentary strata will be demonstrated during local field excursions. Of interest to students in life and physical sciences.
Two hour lecture every week.
Exclusion: GLG301 (GLGB02)
Prerequisite: EESA06H (EESA03H)
N. Eyles

EESB02H3 Principles of Geomorphology

The physical and chemical processes responsible for the development of regolith at the surface of the earth and the mechanics of entrainment, transport and deposition of mass by rivers, wind, glaciers, water waves, gravitational stresses, etc., which control the evolution of surface morphology.

Field excursions and laboratory exercises will allow students to apply theory to natural systems and to understand the dynamics of one man-modified geomorphic system.

Two hour lecture every week and a two hour practical every other week.

Exclusion: (GGRB19)

Prerequisite: EESA06H (EESA02H) (GGRA05)

B. Greenwood

EESB03H3 Principles of Climatology

An overview of the physical and dynamic nature of meteorology, climatology and related aspects of oceanography.

Major topics include: atmospheric composition, nature of atmospheric radiation, atmospheric moisture and cloud

development, atmospheric motion including air masses, front formation and upper air circulation, weather forecasting, ocean circulation, climate classification, climate change theory and global warming.

Tutorials include the accessing and analysis of meteorological and climatological data through the Internet.

Two hour lecture and two hour practical per week.

Exclusion: GGR203, GGR312 (GGRB03)

Prerequisite: EESA06H (EESA02H) (GGRA05) or an A-level science course with permission of the instructor.

W. Gough

EESB04H3 Principles of Hydrology

The water and energy balances are considered as the basis for the measurement of the flows of water through the terrestrial part of the hydrologic cycle, and the measurement of the components of both balances is described.

Conventional or operational modelling of hydrologic processes and the application of these techniques in related fields. Emphasis is placed on the measurement and estimation of water fluxes at the drainage basin scale. Objectives include a better understanding of how water moves through natural systems, the ways in which human activity changes hydrologic process, and the kinds of modelling used in planning exercises.

Two hour lecture every week and a two hour practical every other week.

Exclusions: (GGRC28), (GGRC38), GGR206.

Prerequisite: EESA01H or EESA06H (EESA02H) (GGRA05), IDSB02H, EESB02H (GGRB19), EESB03H (GGRB03)

A.G. Price

EESB05H3 Principles of Soil Science

A study of the processes of pedogenesis and the development of diverse soil profiles, their field relationships and their response to changing environmental conditions.

An examination of the fundamental soil properties of importance in soil management. An introduction to the techniques of soil examination in the field, soil analysis in the laboratory and the basic principles of soil classification.

Two hour lecture every week and a two hour practical every other week.

Exclusion: (GGRC27), (GGRB35)

Prerequisite: Any A-level course in Environmental Science or IDSB02H

T.B.A.

EESB09H3 Biotechnology - Environmental Implications

An examination of the environmental implications of the applications of recent advances in biotechnology. Fundamental biotechnological techniques are explained, followed by an examination of current applications and the potential ecological effects of these applications. Topics covered include bioremediation, biomass conversion, the manufacture of biological control agents, and the genetic engineering of crop plants, fish and other aquaculture species, and livestock, and wildlife forensics. Ecological concerns over the use of genetically engineered organisms will be examined, and the technique used to monitor environmental effects will be discussed.

Prerequisite: BGYA01Y (BIOA03Y) or (EESA04H)

Recommended Background: BGYB50Y

T.B.A.

EESB13H3 Deformation of Earth Materials

Local, regional and plate tectonic stresses; earth material deformation and failure.

Principles of geomechanics; geotechnical influences on rock behaviour; controls on important earth processes such as folding, faulting and mass wasting. Geological structures observed at field sites in Ontario, and interpreted from geological maps, reveal the history of earth movements in the area. Insights into how earth materials might behave in the future under changing stress conditions.

Two hour lecture every week.

Prerequisite: EESA01H or EESA06H (EESA03H)

K. Howard/N. Eyles/J. Westgate

EESB14H3 Earth Materials

Introduction to minerals and rocks, including their physical and chemical properties, classification, origin and uses. Laboratory exercises will emphasize examination and identification of minerals and rocks in hand specimens.

Two hour lecture and two hour practical every other week.

Exclusions: EESB11H & EESB12H

Prerequisites: EESA01H & EESA06H

J. Westgate

EESC03H3 Remote Sensing & Geographic Information Systems

Fundamentals of GIS and remote sensing: spatial data types, data capture, data input and output formats, georeferencing and coordinate systems, topology, spatial analysis techniques, remotely sensed image analysis and map production.

Application of GIS technology to "real-world" situations and both regional and global environmental problems using multiple datasets will be demonstrated.

Extensive hands-on experience with GIS software (ArcView - Windows; Grass - Unix; Idrisi - DOS; others if time permits) and various hardware devices (e.g. digitizer, plotter, etc.)

Two hour lecture and two hour practical every week.

Prerequisites: EESA06H & 1.5 F.C.E.'s in B- or C-level EES courses.

M. Doughty

EESC04H3 Biogeography and Biodiversity

Theoretical and practical aspects of the diversity of animal form and function, together with examination of the distribution patterns of representative taxa.

This course will familiarize students with the diversity of animal life and how this is organized for scientific study. Much of the course will be concerned with invertebrate animals, as it is amongst their phyla that the vast majority of the structural and functional diversity of organisms lies. Information on important animal groups and their evolution will be set in the context of past and present global distribution patterns. Coverage will begin with consideration of the evolution of diversity in a functional context. Subsequent topics will include the major biomes (marine and terrestrial), continental drift, dispersal, endemism, concepts of abundance and rarity, comparison of the biota of continents and islands, and the fundamental influence of climate. Important biological processes to be studied will include adaptation, speciation, colonization and extinction. The course will conclude with discussion of the invasive role of mankind in shaping modern biogeography.

Two hour lecture and three hour practical per week.

Exclusion: (BIOC29)

Prerequisites: [BGYA01Y (BIOA03Y)] or [EESA04H & any 0.5 F.C.E. B- or C-level Biology or Environmental Science course.]

D.D. Williams

EESC07H3 Groundwater

Groundwater represents the world's largest and most important fresh water resource.

This basic course in hydrogeology introduces the principles of groundwater flow and aquifer storage and shows how a knowledge of these fundamental tools is essential for effective groundwater resource management and protection. Special emphasis is placed on the practical methods of resource exploration and assessment; examples of the approach are given for aquifers under environmental stress in southern Ontario, the US and Africa.

Four hour lecture per week.

Prerequisite: EESA06H and 1 F.C.E. in B-level EES courses

K. Howard

EESC13H3 Environmental Impact Assessment and Auditing

To familiarize students with the relevant legislation, qualitative and quantitative approaches and applications for environmental impact assessments and environmental auditing. The focus will be on the assessment of impacts to the natural environment, however, socio-economic impacts will also be discussed. Environmental auditing and environmental certification systems will be discussed in detail. Examples and case studies from forestry, wildlife biology and land use will be used to illustrate the principles and techniques presented in the course. Students will acquire "hands-on" experience in impact assessment and environmental auditing through case studies.

Exclusions: GGR393, INI220, GGRC41

Prerequisites: 2.5 F.C.E. of EES courses or permission of the instructor

D. Puttock

EESC15H3 Research Seminar in Environmental Science

Concepts and methods developed in Environmental Science will be applied to practical environmental problems, within the framework of individual or group projects; a research proposal and a research seminar will be produced. The course is also designed to ensure interaction between students from disparate streams of environmental science through participation in joint seminars with faculty and which environmental practitioners from the community at large.

Three hour lecture per week.

Prerequisite: Permission of co-ordinator

Coordinator: B. Greenwood

EESC16H3 Field Camp I

Designed to familiarize the student with field work in the Earth Sciences; many environmental problems can only be assessed by collecting geological and other data in the field.

This course is designed for students in the Environmental Systems Stream, but students in other streams may register. The course is normally taken at the end of 2nd Year (May) or just before the beginning of the 3rd Year (September) in conjunction with EESD07H.

The camp will be held in alternate years in Costa Rica or Arizona (May) or the Rocky Mountains (September).

Prerequisite: EESB01H, EESB13H/EESB14H and permission of the instructors.

N. Eyles/K. Howard

EESC18H3 The Great Lakes: A Lacustrine System

North America is endowed with eight of the twelve largest fresh-water lakes in the world. The hydrodynamics and hydraulics of the Canadian Great Lakes are used as examples from large lacustrine systems. Fundamental concepts in physical limnology are related to features found in the Great Lakes. Topics include: classification and origin of lakes, temperature structure, seasonal circulation, heat budgets, Langmuir circulation, seiches, waves and water levels. Morphological forms and morphodynamical behaviour as a result of sediment transport process are examined particularly with respect to coastal processes. Specific anthropogenic influences will be illustrated using case studies from the local environment. Field excursions will be an integral part of the course. Two hours of lectures and two hours of laboratory / tutorial per week.
Exclusion: EESC05H
Prerequisite: EESB02H
Recommended Course: EESB03H
Session: Winter Day
B. Greenwood/W. Gough

EESC20H3 Soil Erosion Control

Primarily for students with a good background in Environmental Science. Fundamental theoretical understanding of the processes of soil erosion by wind, water and gravity. Prediction of soil erosion response to natural and anthropogenic changes in the controlling environmental factors. Detailed instruction in soil erosion control methodology and the development of soil conservation strategies. Emphasis on the organization of group research exercises utilizing the Soil Erosion Laboratory. Practical training in research methodology. Experimental testing of new methods for soil erosion control.

Two hour lecture every week and a two hour practical every other week.
Exclusion: EESC11H
Prerequisite: EESB04 or EESB05
Recommended Course: EESB02H
R.B. Bryan

EESC21H3 Urban Environmental Problems of the Greater Toronto Area

Urban areas such at the GTA are the focus of many acute environmental problems such as the disposal of solid and liquid wastes, and the contamination of soil, air and water by industrial activity. Specific cases of such problems drawn from the GTA will be reviewed, with reference to field investigations, environmental audits, due diligence and liability, and remedial solutions. Students will carry out their own field investigations and will report on specific issues, paying particular regard to government legislation and guidelines issued by regulatory agencies. This course is essential to students in the environmental science Program, but is also directly relevant to business and management students.

Two hour lecture and one hour practical per week.

Exclusion: (EESD08H)

Prerequisites: 10 F.C.E.'s in an EES Program, or permission of the instructor.

N. Eyles

EESC23H3 Late Cenozoic Environments

The record of global environmental change during the last three million years as evidenced in terrestrial and marine sediments and ice-cores recovered from the Antarctic and Greenland Ice Sheets; the hominid fossil record and its palaeoenvironmental context; methods used in palaeoenvironmental research, including a survey of appropriate dating techniques.
Two hour lecture and one hour practical per week.
Exclusion: (EESC06H)
Prerequisite: Two B-level EES courses.
J. Westgate

EESC24H3 Advanced Readings in Environmental Science

An advanced supervised readings course which can be taken in any session. Students will follow structured independent readings in any area of Environmental Science. A description of the objectives and scope of the individual offering must be approved by the Discipline Representative and the Supervisor of Studies. Two papers are required in the course; they will be graded by the supervisor and one other faculty member. The course may not be used as a substitute for EES Program requirements.

Prerequisites: A minimum GPA of 2.5, and 3 F.C.E.'s in EES courses. Permission of the Supervisor of Studies and Discipline Representative.

Faculty

EESC28H3 Environmental Law

An introduction to environmental law and the statutory and regulatory framework for environmental management in Ontario. Legal methods available for the resolution of environmental problems; the scope and limits of those methods. Common law and statutory tools; environmental assessment legislation.

Two hour lecture and one hour tutorial per week.

Exclusion: INI422, EESC01

Prerequisite: 1.5 F.C.E.'s in any of the Environmental Science Programs, or permission of the instructor.

L. Nemchin

EESC30H3 Microbial Biogeochemistry

Micro-organisms are central to the movement and fate of organic and inorganic chemicals in the environment, nutrients and contaminants alike. This course will look at the transformative capabilities of micro-organisms and the features of their physiologies and their natural habitats that make these critical behaviours possible. Topics will include waste treatment, pesticide degradation, composting, carbon sequestration and release, trace metal cycling and contaminant immobilization, bio-prospecting, and the mechanisms and rates of microbial evolution. Emerging environmental technologies based on micro-organismal biochemical diversity will be examined, including bio-remediation, bio-bleaching, metal recovery, bio-plastics production, single cell protein production will be introduced.

Exclusion: BGYC55

Prerequisite: CHMA02 and BGYB50

R. Fulthorpe

EESD02H3 Contaminant Hydrogeology

Natural hydrochemical processes; the use of major ions, minor ions, trace metals and environmental isotopes in studying the occurrence and nature of ground water flow. Point and non-point sources of ground water contamination and the mechanisms of contaminant transport.

Two hour lecture and two hour practical every week.

Exclusion: (GLGD01)

Prerequisite: [EESC07H & CHMA02Y], or [MATB41H & CHMB22Y or CHMB11Y]

K. Howard

EESD06H3 Climate Change

Climate change is studied first from a paleoclimatic perspective by examining the climate record and theoretical frameworks explaining climate variability. Orbital forcing, chaos theory, and the Gaia hypothesis are critically assessed. The second approach is to examine the simulation of climate and climate change, particularly anthropogenically induced change. Potential impacts of global warming are explored.
Two hour lecture and one hour practical per week.
Exclusion: (GGRD06)
Prerequisite: EESB03H (GGRB03)
W. Gough

EESD07H3 Field Camp II

This field camp will familiarize students with several geological settings and modern environments.

Designed for students in the Environmental Systems Stream, but students in other environmental streams may register. The course is normally taken at the end of 2nd Year (May) or just before the beginning of the 3rd Year (September) in conjunction with EESC16H. The camp is held in alternate years in Costa Rica or Arizona (May) or the Rocky Mountains (September).

Limited Enrolment: 15

Prerequisite: EESC16H and permission of the instructors

K. Howard/N. Eyles

EESD09H3

EESD10Y3 Research Project in Environmental Science

The design, implementation, and reporting of a substantial research project involving laboratory and/or fieldwork. Existing faculty research allows a broad range of possible topics. The course should be undertaken after the end of the 3rd Year, subject to faculty availability. Faculty permission and supervision is required; open only to those students who have either completed or are undertaking specialist courses in the area of intended study. Students having a B+ or higher standing may be eligible for summer financial support from research projects. Permission of the co-ordinator must be obtained.

Exclusions: GLG470, GLG471; GGRD01Y, (GLGD02, GLGD03)

Prerequisite: EESC15H

Coordinator: W. Gough

EESD11H3 Process Hydrology

The motion of water in terrestrial systems at the hillslope scale, with particular reference to the relationships between surface and subsurface hydrologic processes.

Streamflow generation; the physical processes of infiltration and soil water motion are described in detail. The application of physically based modeling to snowmelt processes; the difficulties of using physically based models in general for the prediction of natural system behaviour.

Two hours of lectures and one hour of practical work per week.

Prerequisites: EESB04H (GGRC38) or GGRB09

Exclusion: (GGRC28Y) (GGRD07)

T. Price

EESD15H3 Cleaning up our Mess: Remediation of Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments

A study of the ways in which hazardous organic and inorganic materials can be removed or attenuated in natural systems.

The theory behind various technologies, with an emphasis on bioremediation techniques and their success in practice. An introduction to the unique challenges associated with the remediation of surface and ground water environments, soils, marine systems, and contaminated sediments. Two hour lecture, and one hour tutorial per week.

Prerequisite: BGYA01Y & EESB04H & EESB05H & CHMB55H

R. Fulthorpe

COURSES NOT OFFERED 2001/2002

EESB10H3 Introduction to Geophysics
Exclusion: (EESD12)
Prerequisite: EESA06H (EESA03H) or EESA05H or permission of the instructor

EESC12H3 Glacial and Periglacial Geomorphology
Exclusion: GLGC06H, GEO326
Prerequisite: EESB01H

EESC19H3 Marine Systems
Exclusion: EESC14H
Prerequisite: EESB03H
Recommended Course: EESB02H

EESC22H3 Environmental Geophysics and Subsurface Exploration Techniques
Exclusion: EESC08H
Prerequisite: EESB01

EESD04H3 Sedimentary Systems
Exclusion: (GGRC25) (GGRD04)
Prerequisite: EESB02H (GGRB19) (EESC05H)

EESD13H3 Environmental Hazard Assessment
Prerequisite: EESB10H or permission of the instructor

EESD14H3 Contaminants in Terrestrial Environments
Prerequisites: [CHMB55H or CHMC35H] & EESB05H


Full Listing of Courses Not Offered

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University of Toronto at Scarborough 2001/2002 Calendar
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