Research Group

Consultants (GTA)

  • Alison Bury, Ph. D., (Clinical Liasion, Psychological Trauma Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health)
  • Jim Parker, Ph.D. (Professor, Department of Psychology, Trent University)
  • Lena Quilty, Ph.D., C.Psych. (Independent Scientist, Clinical Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health)
  • Neil Rector, Ph.D., C.Psych., (Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Hospital)
  • Graeme Taylor, MD (Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai Hospital)
  • Romina Mizrahi, MD, Ph.D. (Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Clinical Scientist, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health)
  • Jeff Meyer, MD, Ph.D. (Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto)
  • Christian Hendershot, Ph.D. (Independent Scientist, Clinical Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health)

External Collaborators

  • Yossef Ben-Porath, Ph.D. (Department of Psychology, Kent State University)
  • Michael Chimielewski, Ph.D. (Department of Psychology, Southern Methodist University)
  • Paul Costa, Ph.D. (Faculty of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University)
  • Andrew Ryder, Ph. D. (Department of Psychology, Concordia University)
  • Martin Sellbom, Ph.D. (Department of Psychology, University of Otago)
  • Lee Anna Clark, Ph.D. (Department of Psychology, University of Notre Dame)
  • David Watson, Ph.D. (Departments of Psychology, University of Iowa and University of Notre Dame)

Graduate Students

Carolyn A. Watters (M. Sc., Trent University),  Ph.D. 4
Carolyn graduated with a Master of Science in Applied Modelling and Quantitative Methods at Trent University while currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Personality and Social Psychology, with a particular interest in psychometrics. The overarching theme of Carolyn’s graduate work has been to explore the utility of advanced statistical methods for modeling complex multi-dimensional personality constructs including maladaptive personality, alexithymia, emotional and social competencies, negative affect and lability, and internet dependence. Carolyn’s dissertation aims to contribute key structural and construct validity evidence to a new model and measure of maladaptive personality, the DSM-5 alternative model of personality disorders and corresponding assessment instrument, the Personality Inventory for DSM-5. Both Carolyn’s Master’s and doctoral work is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Tara Gralnick (M.A., University of Toronto),  Ph.D. 2

Tara is interested in role of personality, cognitive styles, and gender in the treatment and recurrence of major depressive disorder. Her Master’s thesis examined the extent to which personality facet-level traits were amenable to change via a number of therapeutic interventions for depression (cognitive-behavioural therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, and antidepressant medication), and if personality change predicted recurrence of the disorder following treatment. Her dissertation will focus on evaluating the efficacy of a therapeutic assessment intervention in altering undesirable personality traits and their physiological correlates. This intervention will employ measures of universal personality traits in a collaborative manner with clients in order to help them cultivate an understanding of their personality profiles and related difficulties. Tara’s MA was funded the the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and her doctoral work is funded by Vanier (CIHR).

Allison Eades (M.A., University of Colorado, M.A., Concordia), Ph.D. 1

Allison’s research interests represent an intersection between personality, aging, mental health, and neuropsychology. She completed her MA in clinical psychology at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs where she investigated the relationship between personality, perceptions of burdensomeness and belongingness, and self-esteem as they pertain to suicidal ideation among older adults. In Dr. Bagby’s lab she looks forward to exploring the neurocognitive components of personality in the goal of answering questions such as: How might the relationship between personality and cognition mediate different mental health diagnoses? and How might changes in cognition across the lifespan increase an individual’s risk for certain mental health conditions (e.g., depression, suicidality)? Allison’s research is funded by the Fonds de recherché du Québec – Santé in partnership with the Quebec Network on Suicide, Mood Disorders, and Related Disorders.

Sonya Dhillon (H.B.Sc., University of Toronto), M.A. 2 (Co-Supervised with Dr. Konstantine Zakzanis)

Sonya completed her undergraduate degree at UTSC with a specialist in Mental Health Studies. She is a second-year master’s student in the Psychological Clinical Science Program, co-supervised by Dr. Bagby and Dr. Zakzanis. Throughout her graduate studies, Sonya hopes to develop a research program that can help to validate methods in which clinicians and clinical scientists employ in assessment contexts. In particular, Sonya is actively running multiple studies in both labs examining the valid and reliable assessment of traumatic brain injury, the depressive disorders, and the resulting functional impairment. The primary focus of her work is examining the role of neurocognitive functioning within these disorders and how other psychiatric measures can add incremental validity in a clinical setting. She hopes to examine the role that neuropsych/cognition has on real world impairment in the depressive disorders, including additional disorders proposed to be on a depression spectrum. How does cognitive impairment secondary to depressive disorders lead to disability? And how can we focus research efforts on improving the quality of life of those afflicted? Sonya is also the student representative of her graduate division and the president of the PCS Women in Science group. She is often looking for exceptional undergraduate students to mentor in RA roles. Sonya’s work is funded by Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the University of Minnesota Press Test Division, MITACS and Lundbeck Pharmaceuticals.

Matthew McPhee (H.B.Sc., University of Toronto), M.A. 2 (Co-Supervised with Dr. Christian Hendershot)

Matt is a second year MA student in the Clinical Psychology program at UTSC. He is currently co-supervised by Dr. R. Michael Bagby and Dr. Christian Hendershot (primary). Matt’s primary research interests include studying the neurobiological consequences and correlates of alcohol use in young adults using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cognitive outcomes. Moreover, Matt has a keen interest in how a familial history of alcohol dependence may place young adults at an increased risk to engage in hazardous alcohol use patterns. Clinically, Matt is broadly interested in both assessment and intervention focused work. Matt’s graduate work is funded in part by the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Mary H. Beatty Fellowship.

Angie Sekely (M.A., University of North Carolina), M.A. 1 (Co-Supervised with Dr. Konstantine Zakzanis)

Angie completed her B.A. and M.A. in psychology at the University of North Carolina Wilmington where she examined the psychological and neuropsychological concomitants of post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury in military personnel returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. She is currently a first year masters student in the Psychological Clinical Science Program, co-supervised by Dr. Bagby and Dr. Zakzanis. As a graduate student, Angie aims to assess the functional and cognitive changes associated with traumatic brain injury, as well as create, validate and shorten psychological and neuropsychological assessments related to malingering by using item response theory analysis. Her current graduate work is funded in part by the Bassili Graduate Award.

Shauna Solomon-Krakus (M.Sc., McGill), M.A. 1 

Shauna completed her MSc in Psychiatry at McGill University where she examined mediating and moderating factors that impact the relationship between perfectionism and distress. As a graduate student in the Psychological Clinical Science Program, Shauna aims to study the complex intersection between personality psychopathology and eating pathology including how personality impacts the development, course, and treatment of various eating disorders. Her research is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the Bassili Family Scholarship.

Thulasi Thiruchselvam (M.Sc., University of Toronto), M.A. 1 (Co-Supervised with Dr. Lena Quilty)

Thulasi completed her MSc at the Institute of Medical Science (IMS) at the University of Toronto where she explored acute dopaminergic responses to alcohol using Positron Emission Tomography. Her current research interests include the intersection of reinforcement learning and stress in affective disorders, as well as transdiagnostic cognitive processes involved in the maintenance of psychopathology. Her current MA work is funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

Lab Manager

  • Nicole Schoer
    • Contact: bagbylab@gmail.com

Work Study 2016-2017

  • Nayani Ramakrishnan
  • Sandi Johnson

Research Assistants

  • Saad Muhammad
  • Akshayan Vimalanathan
  • Aperame-Aru Balasingam
  • Kamrun Nahar
  • Lahmea Navaratnerajah
  • Ramish Shahab
  • Rogges Anandarajah
  • Hasan Shafqat
  • Daniela Plascencia
  • Vinitaa Rajasingaam