Current Students

Alana Paré

Alana Paré

Pursuing an Undergraduate Degree in French and Theatre and Performance Studies
alana.pare@mail.utoronto.ca

Alana started her degree in 2015, double majoring in the two constant passions in her life. Continuing in theatre professionally was an obvious choice, but the decision to bring French along too seemed organic. She had an early introduction to learning the language thanks to her paternal grandfather, whose family hails from the French community in the Windsor/Détroit area. She had the privilege of going to a French immersion elementary school, then high school. It had become such a large part of her life that it only seemed natural to pursue learning the language, as well as immersing herself in different aspects of French culture which UTSC offers through it’s courses. Her two majors intersected more than she would have thought, and she was able to engage with those subjects while studying French plays and literature that would come up again in her studies of theatre history. After she graduates, she plans to work in the theatre industry all around the world – her bilingualism will grant her opportunities to potentially work in Canada and other French speaking countries in Europe and Africa. The French department at UTSC equipped her with the skills to be well-versed in conversational French, practical translation, and French culture and literature which will grant her the freedom to work anywhere, and to create and enjoy theatre and art in different cultures and communities worldwide. Alana started her degree in 2015, double majoring in the two constant passions in her life. Continuing in theatre professionally was an obvious choice, but the decision to bring French along too seemed organic. She had an early introduction to learning the language thanks to her paternal grandfather, whose family hails from the French community in the Windsor/Détroit area. She had the privilege of going to a French immersion elementary school, then high school. It had become such a large part of her life that it only seemed natural to pursue learning the language, as well as immersing herself in different aspects of French culture which UTSC offers through it’s courses. Her two majors intersected more than she would have thought, and she was able to engage with those subjects while studying French plays and literature that would come up again in her studies of theatre history. After she graduates, she plans to work in the theatre industry all around the world – her bilingualism will grant her opportunities to potentially work in Canada and other French speaking countries in Europe and Africa. The French department at UTSC equipped her with the skills to be well-versed in conversational French, practical translation, and French culture and literature which will grant her the freedom to work anywhere, and to create and enjoy theatre and art in different cultures and communities worldwide.

                matthewL

Matthew Lefaive

Pursuing an Undergraduate Degree in Linguistics and Computer Science
matthew.lefaive@mail.utoronto.ca

I am currently a 3rd year student pursuing an Honours Bachelor of Science for a double major in Computer Science and Linguistics. Initially, I had applied to UTSC solely to study computer science, hopefully in a specialist stream, and took LINA01 “Introduction to Linguistics” to satisfy a writing requirement. I wound up finding the general field of linguistics to be incredibly interesting and wanted to study it more deeply, so when the time came to declare my major(s) I decided that I’d be much happier doing a double major. I had been interested in languages and language learning since high school, so I’m happy I’ve had the opportunity to pursue this passion alongside computer science in university. I really like the hands-on approach and experiential learning we do in some linguistics courses at UTSC, such as in Morphology. Allowing us to collect and analyze our own linguistic data is a fun way to put into practice the theory learnt in the classroom. The professors in the department have also made a very welcoming atmosphere; it feels much more like a friendly community, where you can take the time to get to know your professors and see many familiar classmates each semester. Of particular interest to me would be the overlap of my two majors, namely computational linguistics. More specifically, I find machine translation to be a fascinating subfield and am curious to see how just how natural and accurate current neural machine translation can become. In the future, I would be interested in applying to the University of Toronto’s master’s program in Linguistics.