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English

Faculty List

 
  • M. Assif, B.A. (Hassan II), M.A., Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve), Associate Professor, Teaching Stream
  • C. Bolus-Reichert, M.A., Ph.D. (Indiana), Associate Professor
  • R.M. Brown, M.A., Ph.D. (Binghamton), Professor Emeritus
  • M.C. Cuddy-Keane, M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor Emerita
  • N. Dolan, M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard), Associate Professor
  • A. DuBois, B.A. (Duke), Ph.D. (Harvard), Associate Professor
  • D. Flynn, M.A., Ph.D. (Berkeley), Lecturer
  • K. GastonA.B. (Princeton), M.Phil. (Cambridge), Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor 
  • M.B. Goldman, M.A. (Victoria), Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor
  • S.D. King, M.A., Ph.D. (Western), Associate Professor, Teaching Stream
  • S. Lamb, M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Associate Professor
  • K.R. Larson, M.Phil., M.St. (Oxford), Ph.D. (Toronto), Associate Professor
  • G. Leonard, M.A., Ph.D. (Florida), Professor
  • A. Maurice, M.A., Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Professor
  • A. Milne, M.A., Ph.D. (McMaster), Lecturer
  • S. Nikkila, M.A. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Edinburgh), Lecturer
  • M. Rubright, A.B. (Vassar), M.A. (Missouri-Columbia), Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Professor
  • S. Saljoughi, B.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Ryerson), M.A. (Ryerson), Ph.D. (Minnesota), Assistant Professor
  • N. ten Kortenaar, M.A., Ph.D. (Toronto), Professor
  • D. Tysdal, B.A. (Regina), M.A. (Acadia), M.A. (Toronto), Associate Professor, Teaching Stream
  • K. Vernon, B.A., M.A. (Simon Fraser), Ph.D. (Victoria), Assistant Professor
  • L. Wey, M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard), Lecturer
  • A. Westoll, B.Sc. (Queens), M.F.A. (UBC), Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream

Chair: C. Bolus-Reichert (416-287-7162)

The discipline of English involves not only the study of the great works of literature but also training in responding to the complex modes of interpretation and communication that are invaluable in our increasingly media-saturated world. At UTSC, the curriculum offers courses in the English-language literatures of Britain, Canada, America, and other areas of the world. All courses place emphasis on close responsive reading, critical thinking, and clarity of expression.

A-level courses introduce students to the study of English at the university level. ENGA10H3 and ENGA11H3 are designed both for students wanting an introductory course in the Specialist, Major, or Minor Program in English and for students having a general interest in literature or the twentieth century.

ENGB03H3, ENGB04H3, and ENGB05H3 are required for all English Programs. ENGB27H3 and ENGB28H3 are also required for Specialist and Major programs. B-level courses have no prerequisites and are available both to beginning and to more advanced students.

C-level courses, as their prerequisites indicate, are designed to build upon previous work and presuppose some background in critical skills and some familiarity with the subject matter.

D-level courses provide opportunities for more sophisticated study and require some independent work on the part of the student. These courses are generally restricted in enrolment and may involve the presentation of seminars.

Students are advised to check the prerequisites for C- and D-level courses when planning their individual programs, and to consult with the Program Supervisor before taking courses on other campuses.

Students planning to pursue graduate studies in English are advised to consult the Program Supervisor about appropriate programs of study.

Guidelines for 1st year course selection
First-year students often take ENGA10H3 or ENGA11H3 (or both) as an introduction to university-level English studies. Students intending to complete the Specialist or Major Program in English should plan to take at least two of ENGB03H3, ENGB04H3 and ENGB05H3 early in their university career. They may, if they so choose, begin satisfying these B-level English requirements in their first year. ENGB27H3 and ENGB28H3, also required, offer an overview of literary history that helps prepare students for C- and D-level courses.

Co-operative Programs

English Program Supervisor: A. Maurice (416-287-7180) Email: english-program-supervisor@utsc.utoronto.ca.
Co-op Contact: askcoop@utsc.utoronto.ca

For information on fees, work terms, and studying in the program, please see section 6B.5 (Co-operative Programs) in this Calendar.

Eligible Programs of Study for Co-op
Students enrolled in either the Specialist or Major Program in English are eligible for inclusion in the Co-op Program as outlined in the Humanities and Social Sciences Co-operative section of the Calendar. Co-op students will follow the Specialist or Major Program requirements as outlined above, and will complete 2 Co-op work terms, each being 4 months in length, in addition to their academic requirements. Students in the Major (Co-op) Program must complete a second Major in order to meet program requirements.

Work Terms
The work terms are an integral part of the co-op curriculum. To be eligible for their first work term, students must be in good standing in their chosen program (with a minimum 2.5 Cumulative Grade Point Average) and have completed at least 9.0 full credits, including ENGB03H3, ENGB04H3, and ENGB05H3 as well as all COPD01H3 and COPD03H3 Arts & Science Co-op Work Preparation activities. To be eligible for their second work term, students must have received a satisfactory evaluation of their performance and work term report for their first placement.

Students are individually responsible for ensuring that they have correctly completed all program and degree requirements for graduation.

English Programs

SPECIALIST PROGRAM IN ENGLISH (ARTS)

Program Supervisor: Alice Maurice (416-287-7180).

Email: english-program-supervisor@utsc.utoronto.ca

Program Requirements

12.0 credits in English are required of which at least 3.0 must be at the C-level and 1.5 at the D-level. They should be selected as follows:

  1. ENGB03H3 Critical Thinking About Narrative
  2. ENGB04H3 Critical Thinking About Poetry
  3. ENGB05H3 Critical Writing about Literature
  4. ENGB27H3 Charting Literary History I
  5. ENGB28H3 Charting Literary History II
  6. 2.0 credits from courses whose content is pre-1900
  7. 0.5 credits in Canadian literature
  8. 7.0 additional credits in English

Note: Students may count no more than one of the following courses towards the Specialist requirements:
ENGB35H3 Children's Literature
(ENGB36H3) Detective Fiction
(ENGB41H3) Science Fiction
Students may count no more than one full credit of D-level independent study [ENGD26Y3, ENGD27Y3, ENGD28Y3, (ENGD97H3), ENGD98Y3, (ENGD99H3)] towards an English program.
The following courses do not count towards any English programs: ENG100H, ENG185Y.

MAJOR PROGRAM IN ENGLISH (ARTS)

Program Supervisor: A. Maurice (416-287-7180).

Email: english-program-supervisor@utsc.utoronto.ca

Program Requirements

7.5 credits in English are required of which at least 2.0 must be at the C- or D-level. They should be selected as follows:

  1. ENGB03H3 Critical Thinking About Narrative
  2. ENGB04H3 Critical Thinking About Poetry
  3. ENGB05H3 Critical Writing about Literature
  4. ENGB27H3 Charting Literary History I
  5. ENGB28H3 Charting Literary History II
  6. 1.0 credit from courses whose content is pre-1900
  7. 0.5 credit at the D-level in ENG courses
  8. 3.5 additional credits in English

Notes:

  1. Students may count no more than one of the following courses towards the Major requirements: ENGB35H3 Children's Literature, (ENGB36H3) Detective Fiction, (ENGB41H3) Science Fiction.
  2. Students may count no more than one full credit of D-level independent study [ENGD26Y3, ENGD27Y3, ENGD28Y3, (ENGD97H3), ENGD98Y3, (ENGD99H3)] towards an English program.
  3. The following courses do not count towards any English programs: ENG100H, ENG185Y.
MINOR PROGRAM IN ENGLISH LITERATURE (ARTS)

Program Supervisor: A. Maurice (416-287-7180).

Email: english-program-supervisor@utsc.utoronto.ca

Program Requirements
4.0 credits in English are required. They should be selected as follows:

  1. ENGB03H3 Critical Thinking About Narrative
  2. ENGB04H3 Critical Thinking About Poetry
  3. ENGB05H3 Critical Writing about Literature
  4. 1.0 credits at the C-level
  5. 1.5 additional credits in English.

Students may count no more than one full credit of D-level independent study [ENGD26Y3, ENGD27Y3, ENGD28Y3, (ENGD97H3), ENGD98Y3, (ENGD99H3)] towards an English program.
The following courses do not count towards any English programs: ENG100H, ENG185Y.

MINOR PROGRAM IN CREATIVE WRITING (ARTS)

Program Supervisor: D. Tysdal (416-287-7161) Email: dtysdal@utsc.utoronto.ca

Program Requirements:
Students must complete 4.0 credits as follows. A maximum of 1.0 credit in creativing writing courses may be taken at another campus.

1. 1.5 credits:
ENGB03H3 Critical Thinking about Narrative
ENGB04H3 Critical Thinking about Poetry
[ENGB60H3 Creative Writing: Poetry I or ENGB61H3 Creative Writing: Fiction I]

2. 2.5 credits to be selected from:
ENGB60H3 Creative Writing: Poetry I (if not already counted as a required course)
ENGB61H3 Creative Writing: Fiction I (if not already counted as a required course)
ENGB63H3 Creative Non-Fiction I
ENGC04H3 Creative Writing: Screenwriting
ENGC05H3 Creative Writing: Poetry and New Media
ENGC06H3 Creative Writing: Writing for Comics
ENGC08H3 Special Topics in Creative Writing I
ENGC86H3 Creative Writing: Poetry II
ENGC87H3 Creative Writing: Fiction II
ENGC88H3 Creative Non-Fiction II
ENGD22H3 Special Topics in Creative Writing II
ENGD26Y3 Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Poetry
ENGD27Y3 Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Prose
ENGD28Y3 Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Special Topics

MINOR PROGRAM IN LITERATURE AND FILM STUDIES (ARTS)

Program Supervisor: A. Maurice (416-287-7180).

Email: english-program-supervisor@utsc.utoronto.ca

Program Requirements
4.0 full credits in English are required

1. 1.5 credit as follows:
ENGB70H3 Introduction to Cinema
ENGB75H3 Cinema and Modernity I
ENGB76H3 Cinema and Modernity II

2. 0.5 credits as follows:
ENGA10H3  Introduction to Twentieth-Century Literature and Film: 1890 to World War II
or
ENGA11H3 Introduction to Twentieth-Century Literature and Film: 1945 to Today

3. 1.0 credits at the C-or D-level, from the following:
ENGC56H3 Literature and Media: From Page to Screen
ENGC76H3 The Body in Literature and Film
ENGC78H3 Dystopian Visions in Fiction and Film
ENGC82H3 Cinema Studies: Themes and Theories
ENGC83H3 Studies in World Cinema
ENGD52H3 Cinema: The Auteur Theory
ENGD62H3 Topics in Postcolonial Literature and Film
ENGD91H3 Avant-Garde Cinema
ENGD93H3 Theoretical Approaches to Cinema
ENGD94H3 Stranger than Fiction: The Documentary Film
ENGD96H3 Iranian Cinema

4. 1.0 additional credits in English

Note: Film courses selected from other departments and discipline will be approved for the Minor in Literature and Film Studies on a case-by-case basis.

English Courses


ENGA10H3    Introduction to Twentieth-Century Literature and Film: 1890 to World War II

An exploration of how literature reflects the artistic and cultural concerns that shaped the first part of the twentieth century. This course will introduce students to university-level critical reading and interpretation, by analysing the writing of early twentieth-century men and women.

Exclusion: ENG140Y
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGA11H3    Introduction to Twentieth-Century Literature and Film: 1945 to Today

An exploration of how literature reflects the artistic and cultural concerns that shaped the world after the Second World War. Building on ENGA10H3, this course will introduce students to university-level critical reading and interpretation, by analysing the writing of late twentieth-century men and women from a range of backgrounds and nationalities.

Exclusion: ENG140Y
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB02H3    Effective Writing in the Sciences

This course will provide science students with practical strategies, detailed instructions, and cumulative assignments to help them hone their ability to write clear, coherent, well-reasoned prose for academic and professional purposes. Topics will include scientific journal article formats and standards, peer-review, and rhetorical analysis (of both scientific and lay-science documents).

Exclusion: PCL285H
Enrolment Limits: 25
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language
NOTE: Priority will be given to students enrolled in science programs. Additional students will be admitted as space permits.

ENGB03H3    Critical Thinking About Narrative

An introduction to the literary analysis of narrative. This course will study closely a small number of narratives and narrative genres from different periods in order to develop the critical skills to analyse narratives.

Exclusion: ENG110Y
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB04H3    Critical Thinking About Poetry

An introduction to the literary analysis of poetry. This course will study closely poems and poetic forms from different periods in order to develop the critical skills to analyse poetry.

Exclusion: ENG201Y
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB05H3    Critical Writing about Literature

Intensive training in critical writing about literature. Students learn essay-writing skills (explication; organization and argumentation; research techniques; bibliographies and MLA-style citation) necessary for the study of English at the university level through group workshops, multiple short papers, and a major research-based paper. This is not a grammar course; students are expected to enter with solid English literacy skills.

Exclusion: (ENGB01H3)
Enrolment Limits: 25 per section
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB06H3    Canadian Literature I: Imagining the Nation

A study of Canadian literature from pre-contact to 1920. This course explores the literatures of the 'contact zone," from Indigenous oral and textual literature, to European journals of exploration and discovery, to the literature of pioneer settlers, to the writing of the post-Confederation period.
Pre-1900 course

Exclusion: ENG252Y
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB07H3    Canadian Literature II: Re-imagining the Nation

A continuation of ENGB06H3 introducing students to texts written since 1920 to the present day. Focusing on the development of Canada as an imagined national community, this course explores the challenges of imagining an ethical national community in the context of Canada's ongoing colonial legacy: its multiculturalism; Indigenous and Quebec nationalisms; and recent diasporic and transnational reimaginings of the nation and national belonging.

Exclusion: ENG252Y
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB08H3    American Literature to 1860

An examination of Early American literature in historical context from colonization to the Civil War. This introductory survey places a wide variety of genres including conquest and captivity narratives, theological tracts, sermons, and diaries, as well as classic novels and poems in relation to the multiple subcultures of the period.
Pre-1900 course

Exclusion: ENG250Y
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB09H3    American Literature from the Civil War to the Present

An introductory survey of major novels, short fiction, poetry, and drama produced in the aftermath of the American Civil War. Exploring texts ranging from The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn to Rita Dove's Thomas and Beulah, this course will consider themes of immigration, ethnicity, modernization, individualism, class, and community.

Prerequisite: ENGB08H3
Exclusion: ENG250Y
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB12H3    Life Writing

Life-writing, whether formal biography, chatty memoir, postmodern biotext, or published personal journal, is popular with writers and readers alike. This course introduces students to life-writing as a literary genre and explores major issues such as life-writing and fiction, life-writing and history, the contract between writer and reader, and gender and life-writing.

Exclusion: ENG232H
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB14H3    Twentieth-Century Drama

A study of major plays and playwrights of the twentieth century. This international survey might include turn-of-the-century works by Wilde or Shaw; mid-century drama by Beckett, O'Neill, Albee, or Miller; and later twentieth-century plays by Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard, Caryl Churchill, Peter Shaffer, August Wilson, Tomson Highway, David Hwang, or Athol Fugard.

Exclusion: ENG340H, ENG341H, (ENG342H), (ENGB11H3), (ENGB13H3), (ENG338Y), (ENG339H)
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB17H3    Contemporary Literature from the Caribbean

A study of fiction, drama, and poetry from the West Indies. The course will examine the relation of standard English to the spoken language; the problem of narrating a history of slavery and colonialism; the issues of race, gender, and nation; and the task of making West Indian literary forms.

Exclusion: ENG264H, ENG270Y, NEW223Y, (ENG253Y)
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB19H3    Contemporary Literature from South Asia

A study of literature in English from South Asia, with emphasis on fiction from India. The course will examine the relation of English-language writing to indigenous South Asian traditions, the problem of narrating a history of colonialism and Partition, and the task of transforming the traditional novel for the South Asian context.

Exclusion: ENG270Y, (ENG253Y)
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB25H3    The Canadian Short Story

A study of the Canadian short story. This course traces the development of the Canadian short story, examining narrative techniques, thematic concerns, and innovations that captivate writers and readers alike.

Exclusion: ENG215H
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB27H3    Charting Literary History I

An introduction to the historical and cultural developments that have shaped the study of literature in English before 1700. Focusing on the medieval, early modern, and Restoration periods, this course will examine the notions of literary history and the literary “canon” and explore how contemporary critical approaches impact our readings of literature in English in specific historical and cultural settings.
Pre-1900 course

Exclusion: ENG202Y
Enrolment Limits: 175
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB28H3    Charting Literary History II

An introduction to the historical and cultural developments that have impacted the study of literature in English from 1700 to our contemporary moment. This course will familiarize students with the eighteenth century, Romanticism, the Victorian period, Modernism, and Postmodernism, and will attend to the significance of postcolonial and world literatures in shaping the notions of literary history and the literary “canon.”
Pre-1900 course

Recommended Preparation: ENGB27H3
Enrolment Limits: 175
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB30H3    Classical Myth and Literature

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with Greek and Latin mythology. Readings will include classical materials as well as imporatnt literary texts in English that retell classical myths.
Pre-1900 Course

Exclusion: (ENGC58H3), (ENGC60H3), (ENGC61H3)
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB31H3    The Romance: In Quest of the Marvelous

A study of the romance a genre whose episodic tale of marvellous adventures and questing heroes have been both criticized and celebrated. This course looks at the range of a form stretching from Malory and Spenser through Scott and Tennyson to contemporary forms such as fantasy, science fiction, postmodern romance, and the romance novel.
Pre-1900 course

Exclusion: (ENGC31H3)
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB32H3    Shakespeare in Context I

An introduction to the poetry and plays of William Shakespeare, this course situates his works in the literary, social and political contexts of early modern England. The main emphasis will be on close readings of Shakespeare's sonnets and plays, to be supplemented by classical, medieval, and renaissance prose and poetry upon which Shakespeare drew.
Pre-1900 course.

Exclusion: ENG220Y, (ENGB10H3)
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB33H3    Shakespeare in Context II

A continuation of ENGB32H3, this course introduces students to selected dramatic comedies, tragedies and romances and situates Shakespeare's works in the literary, social and political contexts of early modern England. Our readings will be supplemented by studies of Shakespeare's sources and influences, short theoretical writings, and film excerpts.
Pre-1900 course.

Exclusion: (ENGB10H3), ENG220Y
Recommended Preparation: ENGB32H3
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB34H3    The Short Story

An introduction to the short story as a literary form. This course examines the origins and recent development of the short story, its special appeal for writers and readers, and the particular effects it is able to produce.

Exclusion: ENG213H
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB35H3    Children's Literature

An introduction to children's literature. This course will locate children's literature within the history of social attitudes to children and in terms of such topics as authorial creativity, race, class, gender, and nationhood.

Exclusion: ENG234H
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB37H3    Popular Literature and Mass Culture

This course considers the creation, marketing, and consumption of popular film and fiction. Genres studied might include bestsellers; detective fiction; mysteries, romance, and horror; fantasy and science fiction; "chick lit"; popular song; pulp fiction and fanzines.

Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB38H3    The Graphic Novel

A study of extended narratives in the comic book form. This course combines formal analysis of narrative artwork with an interrogation of social, political, and cultural issues in this popular literary form. Works to be studied may include graphic novels, comic book series, and comic book short story or poetry collections.

Exclusion: ENG235H, (ENGC57H3)
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB45H3    Victorian Literature

An introduction to the poetry and prose of the Victorian period, 1837-1901. Representative authors will be studied in the context of a culture in transition, in which questions about democracy, the rights of women, national identity, imperialism, science and religion, and the place of the arts in everyday life were prominent.
Pre-1900 course

Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB50H3    Women and Literature: Forging a Tradition

An examination of the development of a tradition of women's writing. This course explores the legacy and impact of writers such as Christine de Pizan, Julian of Norwich, Mary Wollstonecraft, Anne Bradstreet, Margaret Cavendish, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Emily Dickinson, and Margaret Fuller, and considers how writing by women has challenged and continues to transform the English literary canon.
Pre-1900 course

Exclusion: (ENG233Y)
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB52H3    Literature and Science

An exploration of the many intersections between the worlds of literature and science. The focus will be on classic and contemporary works of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama that have illuminated, borrowed from or been inspired by the major discoveries and growing cultural significance of the scientific enterprise.

Enrolment Limits: 85
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB60H3    Creative Writing: Poetry I

An introduction to the writing of poetry. This course will provide an introduction to the writing of poetry through workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Exclusion: (ENG369Y)
Recommended Preparation: Students should have developed a small body of creative works before enrolling in this course.
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language
NOTE: Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 5-15 pages of poetry. Please email your portfolio to dtysdal@utsc.utoronto.ca by the first Tuesday of August (for a Fall semester offering) or by the first Monday of October (for a Winter semester offering).

ENGB61H3    Creative Writing: Fiction I

An introduction to the writing of fiction. This course will provide an introduction to the writing of short fiction through workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.

Exclusion: (ENG369Y)
Recommended Preparation: Students should have developed a small body of creative works before enrolling in this course.
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language
NOTE: Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 10-20 pages of fiction (short stories or a novel excerpt). Please email your portfolio to awestoll@utsc.utoronto.ca by the first Tuesday of August (for a Fall semester offering) or by the first Monday of October (for a Winter semester offering).

ENGB63H3    Creative Non-Fiction I

An introduction to the craft of creative non-fiction. Through in-depth reading, discussion of exceptional texts and constructive workshop sessions, students will explore the many key elements of great true stories and produce several original works of creative non-fiction.

Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language
NOTE: Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 5-10 pages of your strongest fiction or non-fiction writing. Please email your portfolio to awestoll@utsc.utoronto.ca no later than the first Tuesday of August (for Fall course offering) or the first Monday of October (for Winter course offering).

ENGB70H3    Introduction to Cinema

An introduction to the critical study of cinema, including films from a broad range of genres, countries, and eras, as well as readings representing the major critical approaches to cinema that have developed over the past century.

Exclusion: INI115Y
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB75H3    Cinema & Modernity I

An investigation of film genres such as melodrama, film noir, and the western from 1895 to the present alongside examples of twentieth-century prose and poetry. We will look at the creation of an ideological space and of new mythologies that helped organize the experience of modern life.

Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGB76H3    Cinema & Modernity II

An investigation of film genres such as romance, gothic, and science fiction from 1895 to the present alongside examples of twentieth-century prose and poetry. We will look at the way cinema developed and created new mythologies that helped people organize the experience of modern life.

Exclusion: (ENG238H)
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC02H3    Major Canadian Authors

An examination of three or more Canadian writers. This course will draw together selected major writers of Canadian fiction or of other forms. Topics vary from year to year and might include a focused study of major women writers; major racialized and ethnicized writers such as African-Canadian or Indigenous writers; major writers of a particular regional or urban location or of a specific literary period.

Prerequisite: [ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)] or [ENGB06H3 or ENGB07H3]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC03H3    Topics in Canadian Fiction

An analysis of Canadian fiction with regard to the problems of representation. Topics considered may include how Canadian fiction writers have responded to and documented the local; social rupture and historical trauma; and the problematics of representation for marginalized societies, groups, and identities.

Prerequisite: [ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)] or [ENGB06H3 or ENGB07H3]
Exclusion: ENG353Y, (ENG216Y)
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC04H3    Creative Writing: Screenwriting

An introduction to the craft of screenwriting undertaken through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 10-20 pages of a complete screenplay or a screenplay in progress. Please email your portfolio to dtysdal@utsc.utoronto.ca by the first Tuesday of August (for a Fall semester offering) or by the first Monday of October (for a Winter semester offering).

Prerequisite: ENGB61H3
Recommended Preparation: Students should have developed a small body of creative works before enrolling in this course.
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC05H3    Creative Writing: Poetry and New Media

A creative investigation into the intersections between poetry and new media (from wikis to cell phones to social media) undertaken through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 5-10 pages of your best poetry. Please email your portfolio to dtysdal@utsc.utoronto.ca by the first Tuesday of August (for a Fall semester offering) or by the first Monday of October (for a Winter semester offering).

Prerequisite: ENGB61H3
Recommended Preparation: Students should have developed a small body of creative works before enrolling in this course.
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC06H3    Creative Writing: Writing for Comics

An introduction to the writing of comics undertaken through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 10-20 pages of a complete script or a script in progress. Please email your portfolio to dtysdal@utsc.utoronto.ca by the first Tuesday of August (for a Fall semester offering) or by the first Monday of October (for a Winter semester offering).

Prerequisite: ENGB61H3
Recommended Preparation: Students should have developed a small body of creative works before enrolling in this course.
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC07H3    Canadian Drama

A study of major Canadian playwrights with an emphasis on the creation of a national theatre, distinctive themes that emerge, and their relation to regional and national concerns. This course explores the perspectives of Québécois, feminist, Native, queer, ethnic, and Black playwrights who have shaped Canadian theatre.

Prerequisite: [ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]; or ENGB06H3 or ENGB07H3; Alternative prerequisites - [VPDB10H3 & VPDB11H3]
Exclusion: ENG352H, (ENG223H)
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC08H3    Special Topics in Creative Writing I

This multi-genre creative writing course, designed around a specific theme or topic, will encourage interdisciplinary practice, experiential adventuring, and rigorous theoretical reflection through readings, exercises, field trips, projects, etc. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 10-20 pages of your best writing (any genre). Please email your portfolio to dtysdal@utsc.utoronto.ca by the first Tuesday of August (for a Fall semester offering) or by the first Monday of October (for a Winter semester offering).

Prerequisite: ENGB60H3 or ENGB61H3
Recommended Preparation: Students should have developed a small body of creative works before enrolling in this course.
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC09H3    Canadian Poetry

A study of contemporary Canadian poetry in English, with a changing emphasis on the poetry of particular time-periods, regions, and communities. Discussion will focus on the ways poetic form achieves meaning and opens up new strategies for thinking critically about the important social and political issues of our world.

Prerequisite: [ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]] or ENGB06H3 or ENGB07H3
Exclusion: ENG354Y
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC10H3    Studies in Shakespeare

A study of the plays of Shakespeare. An in-depth study of select plays from Shakespeare's dramatic corpus combined with an introduction to the critical debates within Shakespeare studies. Students will gain a richer understanding of Shakespeare's texts and their critical reception.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: [ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3) or (ENGB10H3)]] and [ENGB32H3 or ENGB33H3]
Exclusion: ENG336H
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC11H3    Poetry and Popular Culture

Poetry is often seen as distant from daily life. We will instead see how poetry is crucial in popular culture, which in turn impacts poetry. We will read such popular poets as Ginsberg and Plath, look at poetry in film, and consider song lyrics as a form of popular poetry.

Exclusion: (ENGA18H3)
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC12H3    Individualism and Community in American Literature

An exploration of the tension in American literature between two conflicting concepts of self. We will examine the influence on American literature of the opposition between an abstract, "rights-based," liberal-individualist conception of the self and a more traditional, communitarian sense of the self as determined by inherited regional, familial, and social bonds.

Prerequisite: [ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]] or [ENGB08H3 & ENGB09H3]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC13H3    Ethnic Traditions in American Literature

A survey of the literature of Native Peoples, Africans, Irish, Jews, Italians, Latinos, and East Asians in the U.S, focusing on one or two groups each term. We will look at how writers of each group register the affective costs of the transition from "old-world" communalism to "new-world" individualism.

Prerequisite: [ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]] or [ENGB08H3 & ENGB09H3].
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC15H3    Concepts in Literary Criticism

A study of selected topics in literary criticism. Schools of criticism and critical methodologies such as New Criticism, structuralism, poststructuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, gender and sexuality studies, New Historicism, and postcolonialism will be covered, both to give students a roughly century-wide survey of the field and to provide them with a range of models applicable to their own critical work as writers and thinkers. Recommended for students planning to pursue graduate study in English literature.

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: ENG280H, (ENG267H)
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC16H3    The Bible and Literature I

Literary analysis of the Hebrew Bible (Christian Old Testament) and its profound influence on literature. This course considers both the literary nature of and the influence on literature of such narratives as the fall of Adam and Eve, Noah's flood, Abraham's binding of Isaac, and the story of Moses, The Song of Solomon, Job, Jonah, Jeremiah.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: (ENGB42H3), (ENG200Y)
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC17H3    The Bible and Literature II

Literary analysis of the New Testament's narratives and other forms as well as consideration of selected literary texts and works of visual art that the New Testament has influenced. Topics to be discussed include repetition and difference in the four canonical Gospels, Jesus and the prophetic tradition, Paul and epistolary rhetoric, and the apocalyptic and political discourses of the Book of Revelation; some apocryphal works, such as the Infancy Gospel of Thomas, may also be discussed.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGC16H3 or (ENGB42H3)
Exclusion: (ENGB43H3), (ENG200Y)
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC21H3    The Victorian Novel to 1860

A study of major works of Victorian fiction, 1830-1860. This course focuses on the development of the realist novel in its social context. Authors studied might include Charles Dickens, William Makepeace Thackeray, the Bronte sisters, Anthony Trollope and Elizabeth Gaskell.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: ENG324Y
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC22H3    The Victorian Novel after 1860

A study of major works of Victorian fiction, 1860-1901. This course examines the emergence of the sensation novel, fantasy and science fiction, and high Victorian realism. Authors studied might include George Eliot, Wilkie Collins, George MacDonald, Thomas Hardy, Robert Louis Stevenson, H.G. Wells, Joseph Conrad, or Rudyard Kipling.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: ENG324Y
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC23H3    Fantasy and the Fantastic in Literature and the Other Arts

A study of fantasy and the fantastic from 1800 to the present. Students will consider various theories of the fantastic in order to chart the complex genealogy of modern fantasy across a wide array of literary genres (fairy tales, poems, short stories, romances, and novels) and visual arts (painting, architecture, comics, and film).

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: ENG239H
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC26H3    Drama: Tragedy

An exploration of major dramatic tragedies in the classic and English tradition. European philosophers and literary critics since Aristotle have sought to understand and define the genre of tragedy, one of the oldest literary forms in existence. In this course, we will read representative works of dramatic tragedy and investigate how tragedy as a genre has evolved over the centuries.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)] Alternative pre/co-requisites: VPDB10H3 & VPDB11H3
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC27H3    Drama: Comedy

An historical exploration of comedy as a major form of dramatic expression. Comedy, like its more august counterpary tragedy, has been subjected to centuries of theoretical deliberation about its form and function. In this course, we will read representative works of dramatic comedy and consider how different ages have developed their own unique forms of comedy.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)] Alternative prerequisites: VPDB10H3 & VPDB11H3
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC29H3    Chaucer

Selections from The Canterbury Tales and other works by the greatest English writer before Shakespeare. In studying Chaucer's medieval masterpiece, students will encounter a variety of tales and tellers, with subject matter that ranges from broad and bawdy humour through subtle social satire to moral fable.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: ENG300Y
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC30H3    Studies in Medieval Literature

A study of selected medieval texts by one or more authors.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: ENG311H
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC33H3    Deceit, Dissent, and the English Civil Wars, 1603-1660

A study of the poetry, prose, and drama written in England between the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603 and the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660. This course will examine the innovative literature of these politically tumultuous years alongside debates concerning personal and political sovereignty, religion, censorship, ethnicity, courtship and marriage, and women's authorship.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 and ENGB04H3 and [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: ENG304Y
Recommended Preparation: ENGB32H3 or ENGB33H3
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC34H3    Early Modern Women and Literature, 1500-1700

A focused exploration of women's writing in the early modern period. This course considers the variety of texts produced by women (including closet drama, religious and secular poetry, diaries, letters, prose romance, translations, polemical tracts, and confessions), the contexts that shaped those writings, and the theoretical questions with which they engage.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB50H3 or [ENGB03H3 and ENGB04H3 and [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]]
Recommended Preparation: [ENGB32H3 or ENGB33H3] and [ENGC10H3 or (ENGC32H2) or ENGC33H3]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC35H3    Imagined Communities in Early Modern England, 1500-1700

A study of the real and imagined multiculturalism of early modern English life. How did English encounters and exchanges with people, products, languages, and material culture from around the globe redefine ideas of national, ethnic, and racial community? In exploring this question, we will consider drama, poetry, travel journals, autobiography, letters, cookbooks, costume books, and maps.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Recommended Preparation: [ENGB32H3 or ENGB33H3] & [ENGC10H3 or (ENGC32H3) or ENGC33H3]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC36H3    Literature and Culture, 1660-1750

Studies in literature and literary culture during a turbulent era that was marked by extraordinary cultural ferment and literary experimentation. During this period satire and polemic flourished, Milton wrote his great epic, Behn her brilliant comedies, Swift his bitter attacks, and Pope his technically balanced but often viciously biased poetry.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [either ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: ENG305H
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC37H3    Literature and Culture, 1750-1830

An exploration of literature and literary culture during the end of the eighteenth and beginning of the nineteenth centuries. We will trace the development of a consciously national culture, and birth of the concepts of high, middle, and low cultures. Authors may include Johnson, Boswell, Burney, Sheridan, Yearsley, Blake, and Wordsworth.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC38H3    Novel Genres: Fiction, Journalism, News, and Autobiography, 1640-1750

An examination of generic experimentation that began during the English Civil Wars and led to the novel. We will address such authors as Aphra Behn and Daniel Defoe, alongside news, ballads, and scandal sheets; and look at the book trade, censorship, and the growth of the popular press.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: ENG322Y
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC39H3    The Early Novel in Context, 1740-1830

A contextual study of the first fictions that contemporaries recognized as being the novel. We will examine the novel in the context of its readers; of neighbouring genres such as letters, non-fiction travel writing, conduct manuals; and of culture more generally. Authors might include Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Burney, Austen and others.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: ENG322Y
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC42H3    Romanticism

A study of the Romantic Movement in European literature, 1750-1850. This course investigates the cultural and historical origins of the Romantic Movement, its complex definitions and varieties of expression, and the responses it provoked in the wider culture. Examination of representative authors such as Goethe, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, P. B. Shelley, Keats, Byron and M. Shelley will be combined with study of the philosophical and historical backgrounds of Romanticism.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: ENG308Y
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC43H3    Nineteenth-Century Literature and Contemporary Culture

An investigation of how nineteenth-century literature is translated into our contemporary world through art forms like music, architecture, film, television, graphic novels, or online and social media. What is it that makes us keep returning to the past, and how does each adaptation re-make the original into something new and relevant?
Pre-1900 course.

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 and ENGB04H3 and [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC44H3    Self and Other in Literature and Film

A study of the relation between self and other in narrative fiction. This course will examine three approaches to the self-other relation: the moral relation, the epistemological relation, and the functional relation. Examples will be chosen to reflect engagements with gendered others, with historical others, with generational others, with cultural and national others.

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC47H3    Modernist Poetry

A study of poetry written roughly between the World Wars. Poets from several nations may be considered. Topics to be treated include Modernist difficulty, formal experimentation, and the politics of verse. Literary traditions from which Modernist poets drew will be discussed, as will the influence of Modernism on postmodern writing.

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC48H3    Satire

An investigation of the literatures and theories of the unthinkable, the reformist, the iconoclastic, and the provocative. Satire can be conservative or subversive, corrective or anarchic. This course will address a range of satire and its theories. Writers may range from Juvenal, Horace, Lucian, Erasmus, Donne, Jonson, Rochester, Dryden, Swift, Pope, Gay, Haywood, and Behn to Pynchon, Nabokov and Atwood.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: (ENGD67H3)
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC50H3    Studies in Contemporary American Fiction

Developments in American fiction from the end of the 1950s to the present. A study of fiction from the period that produced James Baldwin, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, John Updike, Norman Mailer, Ann Beatty, Raymond Carver, Don DeLillo, Toni Morrison, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Leslie Marmon Silko. The course may be organized around themes or movements.

Prerequisite: [ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)] or [ENGB08H3 & ENGB09H3]
Exclusion: ENG365H, (ENG361H)
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC51H3    Contemporary Arab Women Writers

A study of Arab women writers from the late nineteenth century to the present. Their novels, short stories, essays, poems, and memoirs invite us to rethink western perceptions of Arab women; therefore, issues of gender, religion, class, nationalism, and colonialism will be examined from Arab women's perspectives, from both the Arab world and North America.

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC54H3    Gender and Genre

An analysis of how gender and the content and structure of poetry, prose, and drama inform each other. Taking as its starting point Virginia Woolf's claim that the novel was the genre most accessible to women because it was not entirely formed, this course will consider how women writers across historical periods and cultural contexts have contributed to specific literary genres and how a consideration of gender impacts our interpretation of literary texts.

Exclusion: (ENGB51H3)
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC56H3    Literature and Media: From Page to Screen

An exploration of the relationship between written literature and film and television. What happens when literature influences film and vice versa, and when literary works are recast as visual media (including the effects of rewriting, reproduction, adaptation, serialization and sequelization)?

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC59H3    Geography and Regionalism in Literature

Analysis of space and place in literature. This course studies representations of space in literature - whether geographical, regional, or topographical - that offer conceptual alternatives to the nation, state, or tribe. Geographical or regional focus may change depending on instructor.

Prerequisite: [ENGB03H3 and ENGB04H3 and [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]] or [SOCB58H3; and an additional 4.0 credits; and registration in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC69H3    Gothic Literature

A study of the Gothic tradition in literature since 1760. Drawing on texts such as Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto, Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, Henry James' The Turn of the Screw, and Anne Rice's Interview with the Vampire, this course will consider how the notion of the "Gothic" has developed across historical periods and how Gothic texts represent the supernatural, the uncanny, and the nightmares of the unconscious mind.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC70H3    The Immigrant Experience in Literature to 1980

An examination of twentieth-century literature, especially fiction, written out of the experience of people who leave one society to come to another already made by others. We will compare the literatures of several ethnic communities in at least three nations, the United States, Britain, and Canada.

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC71H3    The Immigrant Experience in Literature since 1980

A continuation of ENGC70H3, focusing on texts written since 1980.

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)] & ENGC70H3
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC72H3    Contemporary Literature from Africa

A study of fiction, drama, and poetry from English-speaking Africa. The course will examine the relation of English-language writing to indigenous languages, to orality, and to audience, as well as the issues of creating art in a world of suffering and of de-colonizing the narrative of history.

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)] or AFSA01H3
Exclusion: ENG278Y
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC76H3    The Body in Literature and Film

An interdisciplinary exploration of the body in art, film, photography, narrative and popular culture. This course will consider how bodies are written or visualized as "feminine" or "masculine", as heroic, as representing normality or perversity, beauty or monstrosity, legitimacy or illegitimacy, nature or culture. 

Corequisite: Two full credits at the B-level or above from ENG, WST, VPA, VPH, and/or VPS.
Exclusion: (VPAC47H3), (VPHC47H3)
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC78H3    Dystopian Visions in Fiction and Film

An exploration of negative utopias and post-apocalyptic worlds. The course will draw from novels such as 1984, Brave New World, Clockwork Orange, and Oryx and Crake, and films such as Metropolis, Mad Max, Brazil, and The Matrix. Why do we find stories about the world gone wrong so compelling?

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC80H3    Modernist Narrative

Advanced study of a crucial period for the development of new forms of narrative and the beginnings of formal narrative theory, in the context of accelerating modernity.

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC82H3    Cinema Studies: Themes and Theories

A variable theme course that will feature different theoretical approaches to Cinema: feminist, Marxist, psychoanalytic, postcolonial, and semiotic. Thematic clusters include "Madness in Cinema," and "Films on Films."

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC83H3    Studies in World Cinema

A study of Non-Western films. This course analyzes a selection of African, Asian, and Middle Eastern films both on their own terms and against the backdrop of issues of colonialism and globalization.

Prerequisite: [ENGB03H3 and ENGB04H3 and [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]] or [SOCB58H3; and an additional 4.0 credits; and registration in the Minor in Culture, Creativity, and Cities]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC86H3    Creative Writing: Poetry II

An intensive study of the writing of poetry through a selected theme, topic, or author. The course will undertake its study through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio.  The portfolio should contain 5-10 pages of your best poetry. Please email your portfolio to dtysdal@utsc.utoronto.ca by the first Tuesday of August (for a Fall semester offering) or by the first Monday of Octobeer (for a Winter semester offering). 

Prerequisite: ENGB60H3
Recommended Preparation: Students should have developed a small body of creative works before enrolling in this course.
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC87H3    Creative Writing: Fiction II

An intensive study of the writing of fiction through a selected theme, topic, or author. The course will undertake its study through discussions, readings, and workshop sessions. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 10-15 pages of your best fiction. Please email your portfolio to awestoll@utsc.utoronto.ca by the first Tuesday of August (for a Fall semester offering) or by the first Monday of October (for a Winter semester offering).

Prerequisite: ENGB61H3
Recommended Preparation: Students should have developed a small body of creative works before enrolling in this course.
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC88H3    Creative Non-Fiction II

An advanced study of the craft of creative non-fiction. Through in-depth discussion, close reading of exceptional texts and constructive workshop sessions, students will explore special topics in the genre such as: fact versus fiction, writing real people, the moral role of the author, the interview process, and how to get published. Students will also produce, workshop and rewrite an original piece of long-form creative non-fiction and prepare it for potential publication.

Prerequisite: ENGB63H3
Recommended Preparation: Students should have developed a substantial body of creative works before enrolling in this course.
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language
NOTE: Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 10-15 pages of your best fiction or creative non-fiction. Please email your portfolio to awestoll@utsc.utoronto.ca by the first Tuesday of August (for a Fall semester offering) or by the first Monday of October (for a Winter semester offering).

ENGC89H3    Creative Writing and Performance

This course connects writers of poetry and fiction, through discussion and workshop sessions, with artists from other disciplines in an interdisciplinary creative process, with the aim of having students perform their work. Preference will be given to students in Creative Writing, however, students in performance-based disciplines such as TAPS and Music and Culture may be admitted with the permission of the instructor. Admission is by portfolio.

Prerequisite: ENGB61H3 or ENGB62H3
Recommended Preparation: Students should have developed a small body of creative works before enrolling in this course.

Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language
NOTE: Please submit your portfolio to the English Departmental Assistant in HW427 by the first Tuesday of August (for a Fall semester offering) or by the first Monday of October (for a Winter semester offering).

ENGC90H3    Topics in Classical Myth and Literature

This course pursues the in-depth study of a small set of myths. We will explore how a myth or mythological figure is rendered in a range of literary texts ancient and modern, and examine each text as both an individual work of art and a strand that makes up the fabric of each given myth.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 and ENGB04H3 and [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)] and ENGB30H3
Exclusion: CLAC01H3, (ENGC58H3), (ENGC60H3), (ENGC61H3)
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGC91H3    American Realisms

An exploration of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American realism and naturalism in literary and visual culture. This course will explore the work of writers such as Henry James, William Dean Howells, Edith Wharton, Charles Chesnutt, Stephen Crane, Frank Norris, Kate Chopin, and Theodore Dreiser alongside early motion pictures, photographs, and other images from the period.

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 and ENGB04H3 and [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Enrolment Limits: 45
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD03H3    Topics in Contemporary Literary Theory

A study of selected topics in recent literary theory. Emphasis may be placed on the oeuvre of a particular theorist or on the impact of a given theoretical movement; in either case, the relation of theory to literary critical practice will be considered , as will the claims made by theory across a range of aesthetic and political discourses and in response to real world demands. Recommended for students planning to pursue graduate study in English literature.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English.
Recommended Preparation: ENGC15H3
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD07H3    Studies in Postmodern Poetry

The study of a poet or poets writing in English after 1950. Topics may include the use and abuse of tradition, the art and politics of form, the transformations of an oeuvre, and the relationship of poetry to the individual person and to the culture at large.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD08H3    Topics in African Literature

This advanced seminar will provide intensive study of a selected topic in African literature written in English; for example, a single national literature, one or more authors, or a literary movement.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English or [AFSA01H3 & ENGC72H3]
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD12H3    Topics in Life Writing

A detailed study of some aspect or aspects of life-writing. Topics may include life-writing and fiction, theory, criticism, self, and/or gender.
Can count as a pre-1900 course depending on the topic.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD13H3    Rap Poetics

An intensive study of rhetoric, genre, meaning, and form in rap lyrics. The three-decade-plus recorded history of this popular poetry will be discussed in rough chronological order. Aspects of African-American poetics, as well as folk and popular song, germane to the development of rap will be considered, as will narrative and vernacular strategies in lyric more generally; poetry's role in responding to personal need and to social reality will also prove relevant.

Prerequisite: ENGB03H3 & ENGB04H3 & [one of ENGB05H3 or (ENGB01H3)]
Exclusion: (ENGC73H3), (ENGD63H3)
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD14H3    Topics in Early Modern English Literature and Culture

An advanced inquiry into critical questions relating to the development of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literature and culture. Focus may include the intensive study of an author, genre, or body of work.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English.
Recommended Preparation: [ENGB32H3 or ENGB33H3] and one of [ENGC10H3 or (ENGC32H3) or ENGC33H3 or ENGC34H3 or ENGC35H3]
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD18H3    Topics in the Long Eighteenth Century, 1660-1830

Topics in the literature and culture of the long eighteenth century. Topics vary from year to year and might include a study of one or more authors, or the study of a specific literary or theatrical phenomenon.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Recommended Preparation: [one of ENGC37H3 or ENGC38H3 or ENGC39H3]
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD19H3    Theoretical Approaches to Early Modern English Literature and Culture

An in-depth study of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature together with intensive study of the theoretical and critical perspectives that have transformed our understanding of this literature.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Recommended Preparation: [ENGB32H3 or ENGB33H3] and one of [ENGC10H3 or (ENGC32H3) or ENGC33H3 or ENGC34H3 or ENGC35H3]
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD22H3    Special Topics in Creative Writing II

This multi-genre creative writing course, designed around a specific theme or topic, will encourage interdisciplinary practice, experiential adventuring, and rigorous theoretical reflection through readings, exercises, field trips, projects, etc. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 10-20 pages of your best writing (any genre). Please email your portfolio to dtysdal@utsc.utoronto.ca by the first Tuesday of August (for a Fall semester offering) or by the first Monday of October (for a Winter semester offering).

Prerequisite: ENGC08H3
Recommended Preparation: Students should have developed a small body of creative works before enrolling in this course.
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD26Y3    Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Poetry

Advanced study of  the writing of poetry for students who have excelled at the introductory and intermediate levels. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 15-25 pages of your best poetry and a 500-word description of your project. Please email your portfolio to dtysdal@utsc.utoronto.ca by the last Friday of April (for Independent Studies beginning in either the Fall or Winter semesters).

Prerequisite: ENGB60H3 and ENGC86H3 and 1 other C-level Creative Writing course and permission of the instructor.
NOTE: Students may count no more than 1.0 full credit of D-level independent study towards an English program.

ENGD27Y3    Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Prose

Advanced study of  the writing of fiction or creative nonfiction for students who have excelled at the introductory and intermediate levels. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 30-40 pages of your best fiction or creative nonfiction and a 500-word description of your project. Please email your portfolio to awestoll@utsc.utoronto.ca by the last Friday of April (for Independent Studies beginning in either the Fall or Winter semesters).

Prerequisite: [ENGB61H3 or ENGB63H3] and [ENGC87H3 or ENGC88H3] and [1 other C-level Creative Writing course] and permission of the instructor
Exclusion: (ENGD27H3)
NOTE: Students may count no more than 1.0 full credit of D-level independent study towards an English program.

ENGD28Y3    Independent Studies in Creative Writing: Special Topics

Advanced study of  the writing of a specific genre, or on a specific topic or theme, for students who have excelled at the introductory and intermediate levels. Admission by portfolio. The portfolio should contain 20-30 pages of your best work composed in your genre of choice and a 500-word description of your project. Please email your portfolio to dtysdal@utsc.utoronto.ca by the last Friday of April (for Independent Studies beginning in either the Fall or Winter semesters).

Prerequisite: [[ENGB60H3 and ENGC86H3] or [ENGB61H3 and ENGC87H3]] and 1 other C-level Creative Writing course and permission of the instructor.
Exclusion: (ENGD28H3)
NOTE: Students may count no more than 1.0 full credit of D-level independent study towards an English program.

ENGD29H3    Chaucer at Work

Advanced study of Chaucer that explores the process of writing poetry in fourteenth-century England. Specific topics vary from year to year and might include an exploration of Chaucer’s cultural and literary contexts or a survey of contemporary critical approaches to Chaucer and Medieval English literature.

Prerequisite: ENGB27H3 and ENGC29H3
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language
NOTE: Texts will be read in Middle English.

ENGD30H3    Topics in Medieval Literature

Topics in the literature and culture of the medieval period. Topics vary from year to year and might include a study of one or more authors.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Recommended Preparation: ENGC29H3 or ENGC30H3
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD42H3    Studies in Major Modernist Writers

Advanced study of a selected Modernist writer or small group of writers. The course will pursue the development of a single author's work over the course of his or her entire career or it may focus on a small group of thematically or historically related writers.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English.
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD43H3    Topics in Romanticism, 1750-1850

Topics in the literature and culture of the Romantic movement. Topics vary from year to year and may include Romantic nationalism, the Romantic novel, the British 1790s, or American or Canadian Romanticism.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Recommended Preparation: ENGC42H3
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD48H3    Studies in Major Victorian Writers

Advanced study of a selected Victorian writer or small group of writers. The course will pursue the development of a single author's work over the course of his or her entire career or it may focus on a small group of thematically or historically related writers.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Recommended Preparation: ENGB45H3 or ENGC21H3 or ENGC22H3
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD52H3    Cinema: The Auteur Theory

An exploration of the genesis of auteur theory. By focusing on a particular director such as Jane Campion, Kubrick, John Ford, Cronenberg, Chaplin, Egoyan, Bergman, Godard, Kurosawa, Sembene, or Bertolucci, we will trace the extent to which a director's vision can be traced through their body of work.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Exclusion: INI374H, INI375H
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD53H3    Studies in Popular Genres

Advanced study of a genre or genres not typically categorized as “literature”, including different theoretical approaches and/or the historical development of a genre. Possible topics might include science fiction, fantasy, gothic, horror, romance, children’s or young adult fiction, or comics and graphic novels.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD54H3    Comparative Approaches to Literature and Culture

An in-depth examination of a theme or topic though literary texts, films, and/or popular culture. This seminar course will be organized around a particular topic and will include texts from a variety of traditions. Topics might include, for example, “Disability and Narrative” or “Technology in Literature and Popular Culture.”

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD55H3    Literature, Politics, Revolution

This advanced seminar will focus on a selected writer or a small group of writers whose literary work engages with themes of politics, revolution and/or resistance. The course will pursue the development of a single author's work over their entire career, or the development of a small group of thematically or historically related writers, and may include film and other media. Topics will vary year to year.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD57H3    Studies in Major Canadian Writers

Advanced study of a selected Canadian writer or small group of writers. The course will pursue the development of a single author's work over the course of his or her entire career or it may focus on a small group of thematically or historically related writers.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Exclusion: (ENGD51H3), (ENGD88H3)
Recommended Preparation: ENGB06H3 or ENGB07H3
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD58H3    Topics in Canadian Literature

Topics in the literature and culture of Canada. Topics vary from year to year and may include advanced study of ethics, haunting, madness, or myth; or a particular city or region.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Exclusion: (ENGD51H3), (ENGD88H3)
Recommended Preparation: ENGB06H3 or ENGB07H3
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD59H3    Topics in American Poetry

This seminar will usually provide advanced intensive study of a selected American poet each term, following the development of the author's work over the course of his or her entire career. It may also focus on a small group of thematically or historically related poets.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Recommended Preparation: ENGB08H3
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD60H3    Topics in American Prose

This seminar course will usually provide advanced intensive study of a selected American prose-writer each term, following the development of the author's work over the course of his or her entire career. It may also focus on a small group of thematically or historically related prose-writers.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Recommended Preparation: ENGB09H3
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD62H3    Topics in Postcolonial Literature and Film

An exploration of multicultural perspectives on issues of power, perception, and identity as revealed in representations of imperialism and colonialism from the early twentieth century to the present.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English.
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD68H3    Topics in Literature and Religion

Topics might explore the representation of religion in literature, the way religious beliefs might inform the production of literature and literary values, or literature written by members of a particular religious group.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD71H3    Studies in Arab North-American Literature

A study of Arab North-American writers from the twentieth century to the present. Surveying one hundred years of Arab North-American literature, this course will examine issues of gender, identity, assimilation, and diaspora in poetry, novels, short stories, autobiographies and nonfiction.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD80H3    Women and Canadian Writing

A study of the remarkable contribution of women writers to the development of Canadian writing. Drawing from a variety of authors and genres (including novels, essays, poems, autobiographies, biographies, plays, and travel writing), this course will look at topics in women and Canadian literature in the context of theoretical questions about women's writing.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Recommended Preparation: ENGB06H3 or ENGB07H3
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD84H3    Canadian Writing for the New Century

An analysis of features of Canadian writing at the end of the twentieth and the beginning of the twenty-first century. This course will consider such topics as changing themes and sensibilities, canonical challenges, and millennial and apocalyptic themes associated with the end of the twentieth century.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English.
Recommended Preparation: ENGB06H3 or ENGB07H3
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD89H3    Topics in the Victorian Period

Topics vary from year to year and might include Victorian children's literature; city and country in Victorian literature; science and nature in Victorian writing; aestheticism and decadence; or steampunk.
Pre-1900 course

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English.
Exclusion: ENG443Y
Recommended Preparation: ENGB45H3 or ENGC21H3 or ENGC22H3
Enrolment Limits: 22

ENGD91H3    Avant-Garde Cinema

An exploration of Avant-Garde cinema from the earliest experiments of German Expressionism and Surrealism to our own time. The emphasis will be on cinema as an art form aware of its own uniqueness, and determined to discover new ways to exploit the full potential of the "cinematic".

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Exclusion: INI322Y
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD93H3    Theoretical Approaches to Cinema

Advanced study of theories and critical questions that inform current directions in cinema studies.

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in English
Exclusion: INI214Y
Recommended Preparation: A film course at the B- or C-level.
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD94H3    Stranger Than Fiction: The Documentary Film

The study of films from major movements in the documentary tradition, including ethnography, cinema vérité, social documentary, the video diary, and "reality television". The course will examine the tensions between reality and representation, art and politics, technology and narrative, film and audience.

Prerequisite: 2 courses at the C-level in English
Exclusion: INI325Y
Recommended Preparation: A film course at the B- or C-level.
Enrolment Limits: 22
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD95H3    Creative Writing as a Profession

A practical introduction to the tools, skills and knowledge-base required to publish in the digital age and to sustain a professional creative writing career. Topics include: the publishing landscape, pitching creative work, and employment avenues for creative writers. Will also include a workshop component (open to all genres).

Prerequisite: 2 C-level courses in Creative Writing
Recommended Preparation: Students should have developed a significant body of creative works before enrolling in this course.
Enrolment Limits: 20
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language

ENGD96H3    Iranian Cinema

This course examines the development of Iranian cinema, particularly experimental and art cinema. Questions of form, and the political and social dimensions of cinema, will be considered alongside the theory of national cinemas. The course places Iranian cinema in a global context by considering it with other national cinemas.

Prerequisite: At least one course (0.5 credit) at B- or C-level in film
Breadth Requirement: Arts, Literature & Language
NOTE: Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Minor in Literature and Film Studies.

ENGD98Y3    Senior Essay and Capstone Seminar

An intensive year-long seminar that supports students in the development of a major independent scholarly project. Drawing on workshops and peer review, bi-monthly seminar meetings will introduce students to advanced research methodologies in English and will provide an important framework for students as they develop their individual senior essays. Depending on the subject area of the senior essay, this course can be counted towards the Pre-1900 requirement.

Prerequisite: Minimum GPA of 3.5 in English courses; 15.0 credits, of which at least 2.0 must be at the C-or D-level in English.
Exclusion: ENG490Y
Recommended Preparation: At least one D-level course in English
Enrolment Limits: 15

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